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A 5-year prospective study of predictors for disability pension among patients with major depressive disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129883
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2012 Apr;125(4):325-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
I A K Holma
K M Holma
T K Melartin
H J Rytsälä
E T Isometsä
Author Affiliation
Mood, Depression, and Suicidal Behaviour Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2012 Apr;125(4):325-34
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder, Major - physiopathology - psychology
Disabled Persons - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Employment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Pensions - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Abstract
There is a scarcity of prospective long-term studies on work disability caused by depression. We investigated predictors for disability pension among psychiatric patients with MDD.
The Vantaa Depression Study followed up prospectively 269 psychiatric in- and out-patients with DSM-IV MDD for 5 years with a life chart, including 230 (91.3%) patients belonging to labour force. Information on disability pensions was obtained from interviews, patient records and registers.
Within 5 years, 20% of the patients belonging to labour force at baseline were granted a disability pension. In multivariate analyses, the significant baseline predictors for granted disability pension were age =50 years (HR = 3.91, P
PubMed ID
22054701 View in PubMed
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A 10-year population-based study of people with multiple sclerosis in Stockholm, Sweden: use of and satisfaction with care and the value of different factors in predicting use of care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275585
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2015;15:480
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Charlotte Chruzander
Sverker Johansson
Kristina Gottberg
Ulrika Einarsson
Jan Hillert
Lotta Widén Holmqvist
Charlotte Ytterberg
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2015;15:480
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care - utilization
Disabled Persons - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Primary Health Care - utilization
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The national strategy for treatment of chronic diseases - including MS - and changes in the Swedish welfare system, call for analyses of the use of, and patient satisfaction with, care in a long-term perspective. The aim was therefore to explore the use of care and the predictive value of personal factors, disease-specific factors and functioning on the use of care and to explore patient satisfaction with care in a 10-year perspective.
Information regarding personal factors, disease-specific factors, functioning and satisfaction with care was collected by home-visits; use of care was collected from the Stockholm County Council computerised register.
Data from 121 people with MS (PwMS) was collected. Primary care accounted for the majority of all care. Neurology and Rehabilitation Departments together accounted for two-thirds of all hospital outpatient care. Rehabilitation Departments accounted for one-third of the total number of inpatient days. Lower coping capacity, impaired manual dexterity and activity of daily living dependency at baseline, together with progress in MS disability predicted a higher use of care. Overall, patient satisfaction with care was stable over time.
The extensive use of care offers challenges to care coordination. Implementation of person-centred care could be a strategy to increase efficacy/outcome of care.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26499940 View in PubMed
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Abstinence and current or former alcohol use as predictors of disability retirement in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265157
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2015 Jun;43(4):373-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Leena Kaila-Kangas
Teija Kivekäs
Jaana Laitinen
Aki Koskinen
Tommi Härkänen
Leena Hirvonen
Päivi Leino-Arjas
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2015 Jun;43(4):373-80
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Abstinence - statistics & numerical data
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Disabled Persons - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Pensions
Prospective Studies
Records as Topic
Retirement
Risk factors
Abstract
According to previous studies, abstinence from alcohol increases the risk of disability retirement (DR). We studied whether former alcohol users' poor mental or physical health might have contributed to this result.
Prospective population-based study of 3621 occupationally active Finns aged 30-55 years at baseline. Disability pension data for 2000-2011 was retrieved from national pension records. We examined medically certified disability retirement due to all causes and due to mental disorders among lifelong abstainers, former drinkers, those with an alcohol use disorder irrespective of consumption and current users, further classified according to weekly intake of alcohol. Chronic somatic diseases were evaluated in a clinical examination and common mental and alcohol use disorders using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Cox regression was used.
Neither lifelong abstinence nor alcohol consumption, even at hazardous levels, without alcohol use disorder was associated with disability retirement. Compared with light drinkers, former drinkers' hazard ratio for DR due to mental disorders was 2.67 (95% CI 1.39-5.13), allowing for somatic and mental morbidity, physical and psychosocial workload, health behaviour and socio-demographic factors. The respective hazard ratio of DR due to all causes for those with alcohol use disorder was 2.17 (1.49-3.16) and of DR due to mental disorders 4.04 (2.02 to 8.06).
Lifelong abstinence did not predict disability retirement. Former drinkers and people with alcohol use disorders were at a multi-fold risk of work disability due to mental disorders compared with light drinkers, thus it is important to support their work ability.
PubMed ID
25743875 View in PubMed
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An inverse association between self-reported arthritis and mortality in the elderly: findings from the national long-term care survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93694
Source
Rejuvenation Res. 2008 Feb;11(1):251-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Kulminski Alexander M
Kulminskaya Irina V
Ukraintseva Svetlana V
Land Kenneth
Yashin Anatoli I
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA. Alexander.Kulminski@duke.edu
Source
Rejuvenation Res. 2008 Feb;11(1):251-7
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Arthritis - epidemiology - mortality - psychology - therapy
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Disabled Persons - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Long-Term Care
Male
Prevalence
Self Disclosure
Sex Factors
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Major musculoskeletal conditions including arthritis represent an increasing burden on individuals and societies. We analyzed the association between self-reported arthritis and mortality in the U.S. elderly disabled and non-disabled individuals using unique disability-focused data from the large-scale population-based National Long Term Care Survey. It was found that males and females who reported arthritis/rheumatism have, generally, smaller risks of death than those who did not report those conditions. This inverse relationship is more pronounced in disabled individuals. This finding holds for both short-term (relative risk [RR] = 0.81; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.75-0.88 for males and RR = 0.76; CI = 0.71-0.82 for females) and long-term follow-ups (RR = 0.82; CI = 0.78-0.87 for males and RR = 0.83; CI = 0.79-0.87 for females). For females, this effect is age insensitive, while for males it is limited to ages below 85. Demographic and 19 major self-reported geriatric conditions have trivial effect on these risks, supporting the view that a better survival of diseased individuals can be attributed to the effects of medical treatment. Given the widespread prevalence of arthritis/rheumatism and disability in elderly populations and the increasing population of the elderly, these findings call for comprehensive analyses of factors driving better survival and medical costs associated with extended lives.
PubMed ID
18240974 View in PubMed
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Association of comorbid mood disorders and chronic illness with disability and quality of life in Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156181
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 2008;28(4):148-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
T. Gadalla
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Work at the University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 1A1. tahany.gadalla@utoronto.ca
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 2008;28(4):148-54
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Child
Chronic Disease - epidemiology - psychology
Disabled Persons - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Family Relations
Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Fibromyalgia - epidemiology - psychology
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Intestinal Diseases - epidemiology - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Mood Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Ontario
Peptic Ulcer - epidemiology - psychology
Poverty - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Quality of Life
Sex Factors
Single Person - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Stomach Ulcer - epidemiology - psychology
Suicide - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Mood disorders are more prevalent in individuals with chronic physical illness compared to individuals with no such illness. These disorders amplify the disability associated with the physical condition and adversely affect its course, thus contributing to occupational impairment, disruption in interpersonal and family relationships, poor health and suicide. This study used data collected in the Canadian Community Health Survey, cycle 3.1 (2005) to examine factors associated with comorbid mood disorders and to assess their association with the quality of life of individuals living in Ontario. Results indicate that individuals with chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, bowel disorder or stomach or intestinal ulcers had the highest rates of mood disorders. The odds of having a comorbid mood disorder were higher among women, the single, those living in poverty, the Canadian born and those between 30 and 69 years of age. The presence of comorbid mood disorders was significantly associated with short-term disability, requiring help with instrumental daily activities and suicidal ideation. Health care providers are urged to proactively screen chronically ill patients for mood disorders, particularly among the subgroups found to have elevated risk for these disorders.
PubMed ID
18625088 View in PubMed
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The association of mobility disability, weight status and job strain: A cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275745
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2016 May;44(3):311-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
Mattias Norrbäck
Jeroen De Munter
Per Tynelius
Gerd Ahlström
Finn Rasmussen
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2016 May;44(3):311-9
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disabled Persons - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mobility Limitation
Obesity - epidemiology
Social Support
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Work - psychology
Abstract
The study investigated whether people with mobility disability (MD) and/or obesity had higher job strain than people without it, and whether social support at work modifies this association.
The study included 35,160 individuals (25-64 years of age) from the Stockholm Public Health Surveys of 2006 and 2010. Data on MD and obesity (BMI ? 30 kg/m(2)calculated from weight (kg) and height (m)) were self-reported. According to the Demand-Control-Support theory job strain, collective strain, and isolated strain were calculated for six groups of people based on the presence of MD and obesity, using the subtraction approach (demand minus control). Differences in job strain mean scores were estimated by multivariate linear regression. Social support at work was analyzed as a potential effect modifier (high/low).
Obese people with MD had the highest job strain (ß = 0.92, 95% CI 0.64-1.19), compared to normal weight people without MD (reference group). We found that social support at work significantly (p
PubMed ID
26674491 View in PubMed
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Association of PTSD and depression with medical and specialist care utilization in modern peacekeeping veterans in Canada with health-related disabilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167586
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2006 Aug;67(8):1240-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
J Don Richardson
Jon D Elhai
David J Pedlar
Author Affiliation
Operational Stress Injury Clinic, St. Joseph's Health Care London, Parkwood Hospital, London, Ontario, Canada. Don.Richardson@sjhc.london.on.ca
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2006 Aug;67(8):1240-5
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Disabled Persons - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Health Services - economics - utilization
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Medicine - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Military Personnel - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Multivariate Analysis
Personality Inventory
Primary Health Care
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Questionnaires
Sampling Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Specialization
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Veterans - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
We examined the relative associations between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression severity with medical and specialist care use in modern peacekeeping veterans with health-related disabilities.
The participants consisted of 1016 male veterans who served in the Canadian Forces from 1990 to 1999, selected from a larger random sample of 1968 veterans who voluntarily completed an anonymous general health survey conducted by Veterans Affairs Canada in 1999. Survey instruments included the PTSD Checklist-Military Version (PCL-M), Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale, and questionnaires of health problems and service use, sociodemographic characteristics, and military history.
Among peacekeeping veterans with health disabilities, "probable" PTSD (PCL-M score > or = 50) was associated with significantly more medical service use (primary and specialty care combined), with a mean of 16.4 times (SD = 17.4) compared with 6.0 times (SD = 6.6), p
PubMed ID
16965202 View in PubMed
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Bipolar disorder patients have similar levels of education but lower socio-economic status than the general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140888
Source
J Affect Disord. 2011 Mar;129(1-3):68-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Helle K Schoeyen
Astrid B Birkenaes
Arne E Vaaler
Bjoern H Auestad
Ulrik F Malt
Ole A Andreassen
Gunnar Morken
Author Affiliation
Moodnet Research Group, Psychiatric Division, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway. hsc@sus.no
Source
J Affect Disord. 2011 Mar;129(1-3):68-74
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Disabled Persons - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Income
Logistic Models
Male
Marital status
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Social Class
Abstract
There is conflicting evidence regarding the educational level and its importance for social and occupational functioning in bipolar disorder (BD). The aim of this study was to investigate how educational achievement relates to function in BD compared with the general population, and which clinical factors are associated with level of education.
Hospitalized patients with DSM-IV BD (N=257; 69.3% BD I; 25.7% BD II; 5.1 BD NOS; 51.4% females) were consecutively recruited from mental health clinics throughout Norway and compared with a geographically matched reference sample from the general population (N=56,540) on levels of education, marital status, income, and disability benefits. Further analyses of association were carried out using logistic regression analyses.
A significantly higher proportion of subjects in the BD group than in the reference group was single, had low income, or was disabled. No between-group difference was found in educational level. In the reference group education was inversely correlated with the risk of being disabled, but no such relationship was found in the BD group. Rapid cycling and recurring depressive episodes were the only clinical characteristics associated with low educational level.
Acutely admitted patients might not be representative for milder forms of disease.
Despite similar levels of education, BD patients had lower social and occupational function than the general population, and no association was found between education and disability for BD patients.
PubMed ID
20832866 View in PubMed
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The breast cancer related burden of morbidity and mortality in six European countries: the European Disability Weights project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17632
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2004 Jun;14(2):141-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Michelle E Kruijshaar
Jan J Barendregt
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. m.kruijshaar@erasmusmc.nl
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2004 Jun;14(2):141-6
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality - physiopathology
Comparative Study
Cost of Illness
Demography
Disabled Persons - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sickness Impact Profile
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The burden of breast cancer expressed in Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs) was compared for six European countries and its sensitivity to different sources of variation examined. METHODS: DALYs were calculated using country-specific epidemiological data and European Disability Weights. Epidemiological data for 1996 were obtained for Denmark, England and Wales, France, The Netherlands, Spain and Sweden. Disability weights were empirically derived. RESULTS: Denmark and The Netherlands lost the largest number of DALYs (approximately 1100 DALYs per 100,000 women). They were followed by England (87% of the Danish burden), France (72%), Sweden (68%) and Spain (67%). 70 to 80% of the burden was caused by mortality. Cross-national variation in disease epidemiology was the largest source of variation in the burden of breast cancer. Variation in disability weights and uncertainty in epidemiological data had smaller effects. CONCLUSION: To compare the burden of breast cancer and most other types of cancer mortality rates provide sufficient information.
PubMed ID
15230498 View in PubMed
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The burden of mental illness and addiction in ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106845
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2013 Sep;58(9):529-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Sujitha Ratnasingham
John Cairney
Heather Manson
Jürgen Rehm
Elizabeth Lin
Paul Kurdyak
Author Affiliation
Epidemiologist, Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2013 Sep;58(9):529-37
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Behavior, Addictive - economics - epidemiology
Cost of Illness
Disability Evaluation
Female
Health Care Costs - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - classification - diagnosis - economics - epidemiology - psychology
Mental Health Services - economics - statistics & numerical data
Mentally Disabled Persons - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Mortality
Ontario - epidemiology
Prevalence
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Substance-Related Disorders - classification - diagnosis - economics - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
Public Health Ontario and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences have collaborated to estimate the burden of illness attributable to mental disorder and addictions in Ontario.
Health-adjusted life years were used to estimate burden. It is conceptually similar to disability-adjusted life years that were used in the global burden of disease studies. Data sources for the mental illnesses and addictions used in our study included health administrative data for the province of Ontario, survey data from Statistics Canada and the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, vital statistics data from the Ontario Office of the Registrar General, and US epidemiologic survey data.
The 5 conditions with the highest burden are: major depression, bipolar affective disorder, alcohol use disorders (AUDs), social phobia, and schizophrenia. The burden of depression is double the next highest mental health condition (that is, bipolar affective disorder) and is more than the combined burden of the 4 most common cancers in Ontario. AUDs were the only disease group that had a substantial proportion of burden attributable to early death. The burden estimates for the other conditions were primarily due to disability.
The burden of these conditions in Ontario is as large or larger than other conditions, such as cancer and infectious diseases, owing in large part to the high prevalence, chronicity, and age of onset for most mental disorders and addiction problems. The findings serve as an important baseline for future evaluation of interventions intended to address the burden of mental health and addictions.
Notes
Erratum In: Can J Psychiatry. 2013 Oct;58(10):554
PubMed ID
24099501 View in PubMed
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84 records – page 1 of 9.