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339 records – page 1 of 34.

A 5-year prospective study of predictors for disability pension among patients with major depressive disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129883
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2012 Apr;125(4):325-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
I A K Holma
K M Holma
T K Melartin
H J Rytsälä
E T Isometsä
Author Affiliation
Mood, Depression, and Suicidal Behaviour Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2012 Apr;125(4):325-34
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder, Major - physiopathology - psychology
Disabled Persons - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Employment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Pensions - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Abstract
There is a scarcity of prospective long-term studies on work disability caused by depression. We investigated predictors for disability pension among psychiatric patients with MDD.
The Vantaa Depression Study followed up prospectively 269 psychiatric in- and out-patients with DSM-IV MDD for 5 years with a life chart, including 230 (91.3%) patients belonging to labour force. Information on disability pensions was obtained from interviews, patient records and registers.
Within 5 years, 20% of the patients belonging to labour force at baseline were granted a disability pension. In multivariate analyses, the significant baseline predictors for granted disability pension were age =50 years (HR = 3.91, P
PubMed ID
22054701 View in PubMed
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A 10-year population-based study of people with multiple sclerosis in Stockholm, Sweden: use of and satisfaction with care and the value of different factors in predicting use of care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275585
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2015;15:480
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Charlotte Chruzander
Sverker Johansson
Kristina Gottberg
Ulrika Einarsson
Jan Hillert
Lotta Widén Holmqvist
Charlotte Ytterberg
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2015;15:480
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care - utilization
Disabled Persons - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Primary Health Care - utilization
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The national strategy for treatment of chronic diseases - including MS - and changes in the Swedish welfare system, call for analyses of the use of, and patient satisfaction with, care in a long-term perspective. The aim was therefore to explore the use of care and the predictive value of personal factors, disease-specific factors and functioning on the use of care and to explore patient satisfaction with care in a 10-year perspective.
Information regarding personal factors, disease-specific factors, functioning and satisfaction with care was collected by home-visits; use of care was collected from the Stockholm County Council computerised register.
Data from 121 people with MS (PwMS) was collected. Primary care accounted for the majority of all care. Neurology and Rehabilitation Departments together accounted for two-thirds of all hospital outpatient care. Rehabilitation Departments accounted for one-third of the total number of inpatient days. Lower coping capacity, impaired manual dexterity and activity of daily living dependency at baseline, together with progress in MS disability predicted a higher use of care. Overall, patient satisfaction with care was stable over time.
The extensive use of care offers challenges to care coordination. Implementation of person-centred care could be a strategy to increase efficacy/outcome of care.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26499940 View in PubMed
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Ability OnLine: children in hospital now in touch with the world.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214112
Source
Leadersh Health Serv. 1995 Nov-Dec;4(6):26-9, 43
Publication Type
Article
Author
A. Lefebvre
M. McClure
Author Affiliation
Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Leadersh Health Serv. 1995 Nov-Dec;4(6):26-9, 43
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Child, Hospitalized - psychology
Chronic Disease - psychology
Communication Aids for Disabled
Computer Communication Networks - utilization
Disabled Persons - psychology
Humans
Organizational Innovation
Peer Group
Self Concept
Social Facilitation
Social Support
Abstract
Health prevention seeks to avoid the onset of disease or symptoms by eliminating or at least minimizing environmental factors that increase the risk of illness. This article describes Ability OnLine, an innovative program designed to reduce the isolation young people can experience in a healthcare facility or when confined to their home. The electronic bulletin board is a friendly platform for disabled and chronically ill children to easily communicate with their peers and adult and teen mentors.
PubMed ID
10172531 View in PubMed
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Abstinence and current or former alcohol use as predictors of disability retirement in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265157
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2015 Jun;43(4):373-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Leena Kaila-Kangas
Teija Kivekäs
Jaana Laitinen
Aki Koskinen
Tommi Härkänen
Leena Hirvonen
Päivi Leino-Arjas
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2015 Jun;43(4):373-80
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Abstinence - statistics & numerical data
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Disabled Persons - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Pensions
Prospective Studies
Records as Topic
Retirement
Risk factors
Abstract
According to previous studies, abstinence from alcohol increases the risk of disability retirement (DR). We studied whether former alcohol users' poor mental or physical health might have contributed to this result.
Prospective population-based study of 3621 occupationally active Finns aged 30-55 years at baseline. Disability pension data for 2000-2011 was retrieved from national pension records. We examined medically certified disability retirement due to all causes and due to mental disorders among lifelong abstainers, former drinkers, those with an alcohol use disorder irrespective of consumption and current users, further classified according to weekly intake of alcohol. Chronic somatic diseases were evaluated in a clinical examination and common mental and alcohol use disorders using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Cox regression was used.
Neither lifelong abstinence nor alcohol consumption, even at hazardous levels, without alcohol use disorder was associated with disability retirement. Compared with light drinkers, former drinkers' hazard ratio for DR due to mental disorders was 2.67 (95% CI 1.39-5.13), allowing for somatic and mental morbidity, physical and psychosocial workload, health behaviour and socio-demographic factors. The respective hazard ratio of DR due to all causes for those with alcohol use disorder was 2.17 (1.49-3.16) and of DR due to mental disorders 4.04 (2.02 to 8.06).
Lifelong abstinence did not predict disability retirement. Former drinkers and people with alcohol use disorders were at a multi-fold risk of work disability due to mental disorders compared with light drinkers, thus it is important to support their work ability.
PubMed ID
25743875 View in PubMed
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Acceptance of ostomy surgery--a Swedish pilot study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216403
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 1995;9(1):11-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
G. Nordström
K. Lützén
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 1995;9(1):11-5
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Disabled Persons - psychology
Enterostomy - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pilot Projects
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Abstract
The main purpose of this pilot study was instrument development, focused on personal adjustment following ostomy surgery. Two instruments were used: a translated and revised version of the Acceptance of Disability Scale, Modified (ADM), and Antonovsky's Sense of Coherence (SOC) questionnaire. A sample of 26 patients enrolled consecutively at the Ostomy Care Centre at a Swedish hospital were included in the study. A Cronbach's coefficient alpha of 0.95 was obtained for the ADM Scale, Swedish version, which is consistent with the results of similar studies. A significant difference between the ADM scores and type of ostomy surgery indicated that persons with a continent ostomy had a greater acceptance of ostomy surgery than had subjects with conventional ostomy surgery. A close correlation between ADM and SOC was obtained, indicating that persons who accept ostomy surgery will also have a good sense of coherence. The result of this pilot study indicates that further research using both measures may be useful in order to identify which factors are of relevance for nursing practice.
PubMed ID
7777747 View in PubMed
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Accessibility to the public environment as perceived by teenagers with functional limitations in a south Swedish town centre.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190137
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2002 Apr 15;24(6):318-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-2002
Author
Agneta Fänge
Susanne Iwarsson
Asa Persson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Occupational Therapy, Lund University, Sweden. agneta.fange@arb.lu.se
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2002 Apr 15;24(6):318-26
Date
Apr-15-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
Architectural Accessibility
Disabled Persons - psychology
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Public Facilities - standards
Sweden
Abstract
Owing to physical inaccessibility persons with mobility restrictions and other functional limitations often face problems in public environments, leading to restrictions in activity and participation. To investigate general accessibility and perceived problems of accessibility to the public environment in a town centre, as well as visiting preferences to public facilities, among teenagers with functional limitations.
An interview questionnaire specific to a south Swedish town was constructed and used with 33 Swedish teenagers with functional limitations.
To a varying degree, all 33 teenagers commented on accessibility problems, e.g. concerning uneven surface material outdoors, steps at entrances, heavy doors and restricted space indoors. The results also indicated that teenagers with functional limitations to a high extent want to visit the same environments as other teenagers, but that it is often impossible owing to accessibility problems. Furthermore, because of accessibility problems, many of the teenagers were dependent on personal assistance.
Inaccessibility results in dependence, which might affect personal development negatively, and much effort are required in order to ensure activity and societal participation. Efficient priorities in public environment accessibility matters and discussions with the actors involved require valid and reliable data on local accessibility problems.
PubMed ID
12017465 View in PubMed
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[Access to own health information and services on the Internet by disability pensioners and other citizens]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91436
Source
Laeknabladid. 2008 Nov;94(11):729-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Halldórsdóttir Gyda
Thoroddsen Asta St
Author Affiliation
Heilsuneti ehf. gyda@heilsunet.is
Source
Laeknabladid. 2008 Nov;94(11):729-35
Date
Nov-2008
Language
Icelandic
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Consumer Health Information
Disabled Persons - psychology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Research
Humans
Iceland
Insurance, Disability
Internet
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Middle Aged
Patient Access to Records
Patient satisfaction
Pensions
Perception
Questionnaires
Social Security
Young Adult
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study Icelandic citizens' perception, attitude and preferences regarding access to own health information and interactive services at the State Social Security Institute of Iceland (SSSI). Hypotheses regarding differences between disability pensioners and other citizens were put forward. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A descriptive mail survey was performed with a random sample from the Icelandic population, 1400 individuals, age 16 to 67, divided into two groups of 700 each: (1) persons entitled to disability pension (2) other citizens in Iceland. The questionnaire consisted of 56 questions, descriptive statistics were used and Chi square for comparison with 95% as confidence level of significance. Response rate was 34.9%. RESULTS: Perception of rights to access own's health information was significantly higher by pensioners than other citizens. Attitude concerning impact of access was in general positive, with pensioners significantly more positive about effectiveness, perception of health, communication and decisions owing to services, access at SSSI, maintaining health records and controlling access. CONCLUSIONS: The study, the first of its kind in Iceland, supports previous research. The results, as well as foreign models of research projects, are recommended to be used for evolution of electronic health services and researching employees' viewpoints. Future research in Iceland should address the impact of interactive health communication on quality of life, health and services' efficiency.
PubMed ID
18974434 View in PubMed
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Activity limitation, coping efficacy and self-perceived physical independence in people with disability.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178346
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2004 Jul 8;26(13):785-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-8-2004
Author
P Peter Wang
Elizabeth M Badley
Monique Gignac
Author Affiliation
Arthritis Community Research and Evaluation Unit, Toronto Western Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Canada. wang@uhnres.utoronto.ca
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2004 Jul 8;26(13):785-93
Date
Jul-8-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disabled Persons - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Osteoarthritis - physiopathology - psychology
Osteoporosis - physiopathology - psychology
Questionnaires
Abstract
This study examines whether the relationships between activity limitations and independence are mediated by coping efficacy.
Data come from a cross-sectional survey of 286 adults, aged 55 or older, with osteoarthritis (OA) and/or osteoporosis (OP). Physical independence was assessed by asking to what extent respondents' OA/OP had affected their independence on a 5-point scale from 'not at all' to 'a great deal'. Activity limitations were examined in three domains: personal care, community mobility, and household activity. A coping efficacy scale was derived from three items scored on a 5-point Likert-type scale from strongly disagree to strongly agree. Structural equation modelling was used to test the model.
Activity limitation in household activities was directly associated with perceptions of independence, with a statistically significant standardized path coefficients of -0.32. The effect of activity limitation in personal care was partially mediated by coping efficacy with a direct effect of -0.41 which was partially offset by coping efficacy to give a net effect of -0.308. The effect of community mobility on independence was completely mediated through coping efficacy with significant standardized path coefficients of -0.85 (community mobility to coping efficacy) and -0.14 (coping efficacy to independence). The overall model's goodness of fit was excellent (R =0.59, ch-square/df=1.4, CFI=0.97, and NNFI=0.97).
Activity limitation had a detrimental effect on the level of self-perceived independence. Coping efficacy showed a significant mediating effect between activity limitation and self-perceived independence for the domains of personal care and community mobility, but not household tasks. This study suggests that how activity limitation affects perceptions of independence varies across activity limitation domains, and indicates the importance of incorporating activity limitation domains in future studies.
PubMed ID
15371050 View in PubMed
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Adaptation to disability in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: neglected relationships to older adults' perceptions of independence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183771
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2003 Jul 22;25(14):795-806
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-22-2003
Author
Laura-Beth Falter
Monique A M Gignac
Cheryl Cott
Author Affiliation
The Arthritis Community Research and Evaluation Unit, The University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. lb.falter@utoronto.ca
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2003 Jul 22;25(14):795-806
Date
Jul-22-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Attitude to Health
Canada
Disabled Persons - psychology - rehabilitation
Female
Humans
Male
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - psychology - rehabilitation
Questionnaires
Abstract
This study extends understanding of the relationship between disability and independence in older adults with COPD.
An interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to examine disability, adaptation, perceptions of independence, and self-efficacy in a sample of 50 community-dwelling older adults. Odds ratios were used to investigate relationships between variables.
Participants used a wide range of behavioural strategies to adapt to their disability including: limiting activities, optimizing performance (e.g. taking rests), compensating for lost function (e.g. using equipment), and obtaining help from others. The relative use of these adaptations varied across five domains of activity: personal care, in-home mobility, household activities, community mobility, and valued activities. Most participants felt very or extremely independent in all domains. In personal care, those who reported greater disability (O.R. = 0.26), more frequent attempts to optimize performance (O.R. = 0.57), or greater reliance on help from others (O.R. = 0.79) were significantly (p
PubMed ID
12959360 View in PubMed
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339 records – page 1 of 34.