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An explorative, population-based study of female disability pensioners: the role of childhood conditions and alcohol abuse/dependence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9904
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2002;30(3):191-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Marianne Upmark
Kajsa-Lena Thundal
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Department of Public Health Sciences, Division of Social Medicine, Stockholm, Sweden. marianne.upmark@smd.sll.se
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2002;30(3):191-9
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Child
Child Welfare
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Disabled Persons - classification - statistics & numerical data
Domestic Violence - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Insurance, Disability - utilization
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Pensions
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Women's health
Abstract
AIMS: This study investigates the association in women between conditions during childhood and adolescence and alcohol dependence or abuse in adulthood on the one hand, and disability pensions and long-term sickness absence on the other. METHODS: A stratified population-based sample of women in Göteborg was interviewed. For analyses in this study the following variables were selected from the interview protocol: childhood and adolescence, education, employment, social class, self-rated physical health and alcohol dependence or abuse (ADA), with diagnoses assessed according to DSM-III-R. Information on disability pension and sickness absence was obtained from the local Social Insurance Office. RESULTS: Unfavourable conditions during childhood and adolescence and school difficulties as well as early deviant behaviours predicted disability pension and long-term sickness absence in adulthood. For most risk factors ADA could explain only a minor part of the odds ratios found in crude and age-adjusted analyses. CONCLUSION: It is concluded that conditions early in life are predictors in women of disability pension and long-term incapacity to work. There are similarities in the pattern of early risk factors for later alcohol dependence or abuse and for disability pension/long-term sickness absence.
PubMed ID
12227975 View in PubMed
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Application for disability pension and change in use of prescribed drugs. A regional Danish cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151831
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2009 Jun;37(4):380-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Thomas T Petersen
Kirsten Fonager
Henrik Bøggild
Lars Pedersen
Jens T Mortensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus University Hospital, DK-9000 Aalborg, Denmark. thtp@rn.dk
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2009 Jun;37(4):380-6
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Analgesics - administration & dosage
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons - classification - rehabilitation
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Diseases - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Pensions
Registries
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate if a pending application for disability pension had an influence on the applicant's purchase of medical drugs, with a particular focus on musculoskeletal disorders and the use of painkillers.
We performed a registry-based follow-up study including 12,020 applicants for disability pension in a Danish county from 1995 to 2000 and linked this information to a database of drug prescriptions. Purchase of drug was calculated for the 6-month period just before the decision and for the 6-month period 2 years later. Changes in a 2-year time period were estimated by differences in purchase rates. Furthermore, the proportion of applicants with an increased purchase of drugs and the proportion of applicants who ceased buying drugs were estimated. The results were stratified by diagnosis and result of application (awarded/rejected). The analyses were furthermore restricted to musculoskeletal disorders and the use of painkillers.
At baseline 81% had a purchase and after the 2-year time period 11% ceased buying prescribed drugs. Half of all applicants increased the purchase of drugs. For musculoskeletal disorders one third had an increased purchase rate of painkillers while one fourth ceased purchase of drugs with variations in different diagnostic subgroups. The major changes of drug purchase after a pending application for disability pension are probably ascribed to characteristics of the diseases underlying the disability.
PubMed ID
19324925 View in PubMed
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Are components of a comprehensive medical assessment predictive of work disability after an episode of occupational low back trouble?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187542
Source
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2002 Dec 1;27(23):2715-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-2002
Author
David G Hunt
Oonagh A Zuberbier
Allan J Kozlowski
Jonathan Berkowitz
Izabela Z Schultz
Ruth A Milner
Joan M Crook
Dennis C Turk
Author Affiliation
Workers Compensation Board of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2002 Dec 1;27(23):2715-9
Date
Dec-1-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Back Injuries - complications - diagnosis - rehabilitation
British Columbia
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons - classification
Humans
Logistic Models
Low Back Pain - diagnosis - etiology - rehabilitation
Lumbosacral Region
Medical History Taking
Occupational Diseases - complications - diagnosis - rehabilitation
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Physical Examination
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Range of Motion, Articular
Rehabilitation, Vocational
Reproducibility of Results
Risk factors
Work Capacity Evaluation
Abstract
One hundred fifty-nine subacute low back work-injured patients completed a full medical assessment at baseline. A full repeat examination was performed 3 months later, when return-to-work status was determined.
To determine the prognostic value of a comprehensive medical assessment for the prediction of return-to-work status.
A systematic review of the work disability prediction literature of low back trouble prognosis revealed that no high-quality studies included a full medical history and physical examination in the design. The results of studies included in the systematic review were equivocal with respect to predictive usefulness of medical variables.
Participants completed medical history questionnaires and then were clinically examined by one of six experienced examiners (three physicians and three physiotherapists). Return-to-work status was measured 3 months later, and predictive validity was evaluated using logistic regression modeling.
Medical variables (, medical history subscales, physical examination subscales, and lumbar range-of-motion tests) showed modest correct classification rates varying between 61.6% and 69.1% for participants.
Comprehensive medical assessments play a crucial role in the early identification of serious pathology after low back trouble. We were unable to identify, however, any medical evaluation variables that would account for significant proportions of variance in return to work. The weight of evidence obtained in this study suggests that injured workers' subjective interpretations and appraisals may be more powerful predictors of the course of postinjury recovery than exclusively medical assessments.
PubMed ID
12461398 View in PubMed
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[At the midpoint of the United Nations Decade of the Handicapped 1983-1992].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232742
Source
Rehabilitation (Stuttg). 1988 Aug;27(3):131-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1988

The Canadian database on disability issues: a national application of the ICIDH.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214167
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 1995 Oct;17(7):344-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1995
Author
A D Furrie
Author Affiliation
Statistics Canada, Post-Censal Surveys Program, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 1995 Oct;17(7):344-9
Date
Oct-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Canada
Databases, Factual
Disabled Persons - classification - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Population Surveillance - methods
Questionnaires
Registries
Abstract
The need for a national database on persons with disabilities was articulated in early 1980 when members of the Canadian government conducted a nationwide consultation to establish the issues facing persons with disabilities in Canada. This paper will describe the development of this database and show how the International Classification of Impairments, Disabilities, and Handicaps (ICIDH) and the international community played an important role in the successful creation of a database which has been used to improve the quality of life for Canadians with disabilities. The Canadian database on disability issues now includes information from three major surveys: the 1983/84 Canadian Health and Disability Survey (CHDS '83), the 1986/87 Health and Activity Limitation Survey (HALS '86) and the 1991/92 Health and Activity Limitation Survey (HALS '91).
PubMed ID
8680034 View in PubMed
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Change in patient concerns following total knee arthroplasty described with the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health: a repeated measures design.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153700
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2008;6:112
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Ravi Rastogi
Bert M Chesworth
Aileen M Davis
Author Affiliation
Physiotherapist, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario, Canada. ravi.rastogi@lhsc.on.ca
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2008;6:112
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anxiety
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee - psychology - rehabilitation
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons - classification
Female
Health status
Humans
International Classification of Diseases
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Patients - psychology
Postoperative Period
Abstract
There is no published evidence of how patient concerns change during the first six weeks following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). An understanding of the recovery process from the patient's perspective will inform clinicians on how to best educate patients about their post-operative concerns. Our objectives were to (1) quantify the level of importance for each of 32 previously identified concerns pre-operatively, and across the first six weeks following primary TKA and, (2) convey this change in importance post-operatively using the components of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF).
The objectives were achieved using a repeated measures design. Convenience sampling was used to recruit 54 consecutive patients undergoing primary TKA at a hospital in Ontario, Canada. Pre-operatively and at two, four and six weeks post-operatively subjects rated the level of importance for each of the 32 previously identified patient concerns
The importance rating of patient concerns in all four ICF components changed from before surgery to two weeks after surgery. Patient concerns in the Participation component became increasingly important after the first two weeks following surgery. Post-operatively from week two to week four, changes in importance ratings were also found in the Body Function and Activity components, but not in the Environmental Factors component.
Changes in patient concerns mirror their early recovery from TKA surgery. Consistent with this, Participation restrictions become increasingly important to patients after discharge from acute care suggesting that clinicians should think of managing patient expectations for return to societal roles early in post-operative rehabilitation.
Notes
Cites: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2001 Mar;82(3):360-611245759
Cites: Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2003;1:1712801417
Cites: Pain. 2001 Nov;94(2):149-5811690728
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2001 Dec;83-A(12):1856-6411741066
Cites: Disabil Rehabil. 2002 Mar 20;24(5):281-212004974
Cites: J Rheumatol. 2002 Jun;29(6):1273-912064846
Cites: Disabil Rehabil. 2012;34(8):681-9321978202
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Br. 2002 Sep;84(7):994-912358393
Cites: J Rehabil Med. 2002 Sep;34(5):201-412392233
Cites: Am J Occup Ther. 2002 Nov-Dec;56(6):66012630414
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2003 Apr 15;49(2):156-6312687505
Cites: J Rehabil Med. 2003 May;35(3):145-912809198
Cites: Disabil Rehabil. 2003 Jun 3-17;25(11-12):577-8712959331
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2004 May;86-A(5):963-7415118039
Cites: J Rheumatol. 1991 Apr;18(4):591-82066950
Cites: J Rheumatol. 1997 May;24(5):979-849150095
Cites: J Rheumatol. 1997 May;24(5):985-99150096
Cites: Gerontology. 1998;44(4):204-109657080
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1998 Sep;47(6):739-539690821
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 1998 Nov;(356):93-1109917673
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2004 Oct;57(10):1025-3215528053
Cites: BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2005;6:315679884
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2006 Feb;59(2):160-716426951
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2006 Nov;452:35-4316967035
Cites: Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2007;5:4817678532
Cites: Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2001 Feb;9(2):137-4611330253
PubMed ID
19077246 View in PubMed
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Classification of handicaps in 6-7-year-old mentally retarded children. Usefulness and inter-observer agreement of a child adapted handicap code of WHO's ICIDH.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38710
Source
Int Disabil Stud. 1988;10(4):155-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
H. Ferngren
J. Lagergren
Author Affiliation
St Göran's Children's Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Int Disabil Stud. 1988;10(4):155-8
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons - classification
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Retardation - physiopathology - rehabilitation
Sweden
Abstract
This paper reports on the clinical use of a classification of handicaps in 6-7-year-old mentally retarded children. A child-adapted handicap code of WHO's ICIDH was used. It was easy to manage and added valuable information to the child's medical status and psychosocial evaluation. The inter-observer agreement was most satisfactory. The handicap dimension of 'social integration' ought to be regarded as 'social interaction' and needs to be specified further.
PubMed ID
2976755 View in PubMed
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Clinical and administrative outcomes during publicly-funded inpatient stroke rehabilitation based on a case-mix group classification model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175584
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2005 Jan;37(1):45-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2005
Author
Dany Gagnon
Sylvie Nadeau
Vincent Tam
Author Affiliation
Hôpital de Réadaptation Lindsay, 6363 Chemin Hudson, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2005 Jan;37(1):45-52
Date
Jan-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cognition
Diagnosis-Related Groups
Disabled Persons - classification
Female
Humans
Inpatients
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Public Sector
Quebec
Rehabilitation Centers - economics
Retrospective Studies
Stroke - diagnosis - psychology - rehabilitation
Abstract
To determine efficiency and efficacy of publicly-funded inpatient stroke rehabilitation based on a Case-Mix Group Classification Model, and to analyse the usefulness of this decisional aid in the refinement of rehabilitation services delivery needed to optimize accessibility to inpatient rehabilitation services for individuals with stroke in a publicly-funded healthcare system.
Individuals with stroke (n=422) who received inpatient rehabilitation through the Montreal Rehabilitation Hospital Network were included in this retrospective study. Clinical (total, motor and cognitive-Functional Independence Measure (FIM) scores, percentage of discharge to community) and administrative outcomes (onset to rehabilitation interval, length of inpatient rehabilitation stay, length of stay efficiency) were measured.
Across Case-Mix Groups, mean onset to rehabilitation days varied between 16.2 (5.7) and 32.0 (19.4) days whereas the mean length of stay fluctuated between 27.5 (13) and 77.0 (27) days. Best total (41.6 (21.4)) and motor-FIM (38.9 (19.0)) gains were observed in most severely disabled cases (114) whereas the Case-Mix Group 103 presented the best cognitive-FIM gain (5.8 (4.0)). Optimal mean total, motor and cognitive-FIM efficiency rates, found in moderately disabled stroke patients, were 0.668 (0.434), 0.634 (0.377) and 0.15 (0.136), respectively. Majority of patients returned home following rehabilitation in all Case-Mix Groups (63.6% to 96.4%) except for groups 112 and 108.
Moderate to good length of stay efficiencies are observed among all Case-Mix Group following stroke rehabilitation. In fact, individuals with moderate disability present the best rate of recovery. Variations in length of stay efficiency suggest that the use of a Case-Mix Group Classification Model in stroke rehabilitation could represent an innovative approach, especially for program evaluation in publicly-funded and universal-access rehabilitation hospitals.
PubMed ID
15788332 View in PubMed
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A comparison of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health to the disability tax credit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161468
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 2007;74 Spec No.:281-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Angela Conti-Becker
Samantha Doralp
Nora Fayed
Crystal Kean
Raphael Lencucha
Rhysa Leyshon
Jackie Mersich
Shawn Robbins
Phillip C Doyle
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health and Rehabilitation Science, Elborn College, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario. acontib@uwo.ca
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 2007;74 Spec No.:281-7
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons - classification
Health status
Humans
Occupational therapy
Reproducibility of Results
Tax Exemption - classification
Abstract
The Disability Tax Credit (DTC) Certification is an assessment tool used to provide Canadians with disability tax relief The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) provides a universal framework for defining disability.
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the DTC and familiarize occupational therapists with the process of mapping measures to the ICF classification system.
Concepts within the DTC were identified and mapped to appropriate ICF codes (Cieza et al., 2005).
The DTC was linked to 45 unique ICF codes (16 Body Functions, 19 Activities and Participation, and 8 Environmental Factors).
The DTC encompasses various domains of the ICF; however, there is no consideration of Personal Factors, Body Structures, and key aspects of Activities and Participation. Refining the DTC to address these aspects will provide an opportunity for fair and just determinations for those who experience disability.
PubMed ID
17844982 View in PubMed
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50 records – page 1 of 5.