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285 records – page 1 of 29.

Abstracts of the annual meeting of the European Academy of Childhood Disability. 2-4 October 2003, Oslo, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30658
Source
Dev Med Child Neurol Suppl. 2003 Oct;97:1-68
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Source
Dev Med Child Neurol Suppl. 2003 Oct;97:1-68
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Developmental Disabilities - rehabilitation
Disabled Children - rehabilitation
Humans
PubMed ID
14601619 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acceptance, avoidance, and ambiguity: conflicting social values about childhood disability.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170909
Source
Kennedy Inst Ethics J. 2005 Dec;15(4):371-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Carol Levine
Author Affiliation
Families and Health Care Project, United Hospital Fund, New York, NY, USA.
Source
Kennedy Inst Ethics J. 2005 Dec;15(4):371-83
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Caregivers - psychology
Child
Chronic Disease - psychology
Data Collection
Dependency (Psychology)
Disabled Children - psychology
Family Relations
Home Nursing - psychology
Humans
Parents - psychology
Quebec
Respiration, Artificial - ethics - psychology
Siblings - psychology
Social Isolation
Social Justice
Social Values
Ventilators, Mechanical
Abstract
Advances in medical technology now permit children who need ventilator assistance to live at home rather than in hospitals or institutions. What does this ventilator-dependent life mean to children and their families? The impetus for this essay comes from a study of the moral experience of 12 Canadian families--parents, ventilator-dependent child, and well siblings. These families express great love for their children, take on enormous responsibilities for care, live with uncertainty, and attempt to create "normal" home environments. Nevertheless, they experience social isolation, sometimes even from their extended families and health care providers. Their lives are constrained in many ways. The challenges faced by parents of technology-dependent children raise questions of justice within society and within families.
PubMed ID
16453960 View in PubMed
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[A follow up of persons who received basic and/or supplemental benefits in childhood]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29203
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Feb 9;126(4):436-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-9-2006
Author
Tor Bjerkedal
Petter Kristensen
Geir A Skjeret
John Ivar Brevik
Author Affiliation
Forsvarets sanitet, Militaermedisinsk epidemiologi, Ullevål universitetssykehus, Oslo mil/Akershus, 0015 Oslo. tor.bjerkedal@chello.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Feb 9;126(4):436-9
Date
Feb-9-2006
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease - economics - mortality - psychology
Comparative Study
Disabled Children - psychology
Educational Status
English Abstract
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Income
Infant
Male
Norway
Pensions
Registries
Social Security
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Consequences of chronic diseases in childhood with respect to health, educational achievement and participation in the labour force in young adult age are evaluated. MATERIAL AND METHODS :A total of 14,364 children (2.3%) of the 626,928 born in Norway 1967-76 received basic and /or supplemental benefits for at least one year of the age span 0-16 years. The more common diagnoses included Endocrine diseases (diabetes), disease classified under Mental diagnoses, Neurological diseases and Congenital malformations. All the children were followed up to the age of 27 with respect to mortality and disability pensioning and to the age of 25 with regard to education, participation in the labour force and income, and in addition national service for the men. The study was made possible through the linking of data from several national registers, performed by Statistics Norway. Before the file was released for analyses, all personal identification was removed. RESULTS: Basic and supplementary benefits in childhood predict adverse outcomes in young adult age: mortality, disability, low education, lack of gainful employment and low pensionable income. The diagnosis registered with the benefit strongly influenced the outcomes. Conscripts who had received benefits were judged to have a mean score for general ability of 4.5 compared to 5.2. Adjusted for score for general ability the proportion of those having received benefits achieving higher education was 84% of that of those that had not received benefits. After adjustment for educational attainment, the percentage gainfully employed was 11-12% less among subjects having received benefits in childhood. This negative association between having received a benefit in childhood and gainful employment in adulthood was restricted to the low educational group. INTERPRETATION: Persons with health problems in childhood did not achieve the education, employment and income they should have been capable of judged by their general ability and the education they had actually achieved.
PubMed ID
16477279 View in PubMed
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Age-related health risk behaviors of adolescents with physical disabilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180059
Source
Soz Praventivmed. 2004;49(2):132-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Catherine A Steele
Ilze V Kalnins
Beth E Rossen
Douglas W Biggar
Joseph A Bortolussi
Jeffrey W Jutai
Author Affiliation
Bloorview MacMillan Centre, Toronto.
Source
Soz Praventivmed. 2004;49(2):132-41
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - classification
Adolescent
Age Factors
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - prevention & control
Child
Disabled Children - rehabilitation - statistics & numerical data
Female
Food Habits
Health Behavior
Health education
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Surveys
Humans
Likelihood Functions
Male
Ontario
Risk-Taking
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
To investigate age-related differences in health risk behaviors in 11-12-, 13-14-, and 15-16-year-old adolescents with physical disabilities.
Health survey data from 319 adolescents with physical disabilities were compared with the same data from 7,020 adolescents in a national sample.
Significant age-related differences were found for having tried smoking, smoking, having tasted an alcoholic drink, having been drunk, and using prescription drugs for recreational purposes. However, changes were modest and engagement of 15-16-year-old adolescents with physical disabilities was similar to 11-12-year-olds in the general population. Analysis of associations between disability status and health risk behaviors while controlling for age and sex showed that disability is associated with a lower likelihood of having tried smoking, smoking, having tasted an alcoholic drink, drinking, having been drunk, having used drugs, having used prescription drugs for recreational purposes, and eating sweets; a higher likelihood of not engaging in physical exercise, not eating fresh produce, and eating high-fat foods; and non-significant for seat-belt use.
Health promotion programs about health risk behaviours designed for adolescents in the general population may not be appropriate for adolescents with physical disabilities.
PubMed ID
15150865 View in PubMed
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The Agrenska centre: a socioeconomic case study of rare diseases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31251
Source
Pharmacoeconomics. 2002;20 Suppl 3:73-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Anders Olauson
Author Affiliation
Agrenska Centre for Rare Disorders, Gothenburg, Sweden. anders.olauson@agrenska.se
Source
Pharmacoeconomics. 2002;20 Suppl 3:73-5
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Cost of Illness
Disabled Children
Humans
Parent-Child Relations
Rare Diseases - economics
Respite Care - economics - psychology
Self-Help Groups
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
The Agrenska Centre in Gothenburg, Sweden, provides support services to children with disabilities and their families; these services include a unique programme of family activities, respite services, education, information projects, and research. Participants in their programmes have noted how their experiences at the Agrenska Centre differed from their experiences with the healthcare system in other parts of Sweden. The Department of Economics at the University of Gothenburg conducted a study to evaluate whether the benefits of the Agrenska approach might also extend to healthcare savings. There was, in fact, nearly a three-fold decrease in direct and indirect healthcare costs for families using the Agrenska Centre versus those utilising only routine support services. The implication is that society and governments can ill afford not to seek new ways to organise support networks for patients with rare disorders.
PubMed ID
12457427 View in PubMed
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[Also physicians made important contribution to the care of mentally disabled]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77105
Source
Lakartidningen. 2007 Jun 4-11;104(23):1836-7
Publication Type
Article

Ambulant children with spastic cerebral palsy and their parents' perceptions and expectations prior to multilevel surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97734
Source
Dev Neurorehabil. 2010;13(2):80-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Hilde Capjon
Ida Torunn Bjørk
Author Affiliation
Rikshospitalet, Oslo University Hospital, Department of Child Neurology, Oslo, Norway. hilde.capjon@rikshopitalet.no
Source
Dev Neurorehabil. 2010;13(2):80-7
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cerebral Palsy - physiopathology - rehabilitation - surgery
Child
Disabled Children - psychology - rehabilitation
Fatigue - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Male
Muscle Contraction
Muscle, Skeletal - physiopathology
Norway
Pain - prevention & control
Parents - psychology
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Walking
Abstract
PURPOSE: This study explores the pre-operative situation of children accepted for multilevel surgery for cerebral palsy (CP) and their parents. METHODS: Eight ambulatory children with varied severity of spastic CP and their parents were included. Qualitative, semi-structured interviews were carried out separately with the children and parents. RESULTS: Everyday life of the children and their parents was vulnerable. The degree to which children strived for social acceptance and normality increased their pain. Deteriorating physical capacity resulted in pain and fatigue and was the parents' and children's main motivation for the operation. Although the parents were ambivalent to the operation they mediated hope and cautious optimism about a better life for their children. CONCLUSION: Parents' and children's experiences imply the need for improvements to ensure facilitation for disabled children in schools and all levels of the health service, equality of communication and awareness-raising in the pre-operative phase of multilevel surgery.
PubMed ID
20222768 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of certain oral health parameters in children with disabilities].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168239
Source
Stomatologiia (Mosk). 2006;85(3):57-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
D. Bakarcic
A. Legovic
T. Skrinjaric
B. Mady
A. Sasso
I. Vancura
Source
Stomatologiia (Mosk). 2006;85(3):57-60
Date
2006
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Disabled Children
Female
Humans
Male
Malocclusion - epidemiology
Oral Health - standards
Prevalence
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The first permanent molars which show the presence of congenital malocclusions, orthodontic treatment need and habits were studied in children with disabilities and healthy children. The examination covered 80 disabled children and 80 healthy ones (control group) of the age from 3 to 17 (mean age 10) years. Caries of the first permanent molars, bad habits and malocclusions were more common in children with disabilities than in healthy children. It was established that higher orthodontic treatment need was in children with disabilities who were less covered with orthodontic care.
PubMed ID
16858325 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Analysis of primary disability due to ophthalmic pathology in child population of the Amur region].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104752
Source
Vestn Oftalmol. 2013 Nov-Dec;129(6):76-80
Publication Type
Article
Author
A S Vydrov
N Iu Kafanova
E N Komarovskikh
I N Kushnareva
Source
Vestn Oftalmol. 2013 Nov-Dec;129(6):76-80
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Children - statistics & numerical data
Eye Diseases - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Retrospective Studies
Siberia - epidemiology
Abstract
The state of health of child population is a constant care of ophthalmologists of the Amur region. Over the last few years the level of childhood disability due to ophthalmic pathology has decreased from 1.83 per ten thousand (1999) to 1.14 per ten thousand (2011) and, according to our prognosis, will continue to decrease down to 0.82 per ten thousand by 2014. The level of childhood disability in urban and rural areas was 1.17 per ten thousand and 1.06 per ten thousand correspondingly. Female to male proportion in primary disabled children in the Amur region in 2002-2004 was 43% to 57%. For many years the leading cause of childhood disability due to pathology of the organ of vision has been amblyopia (28%). Prevention and reduction of primary disability of children is one of the main activities of pediatric ophthalmologists in Russia.
PubMed ID
24624808 View in PubMed
Less detail

285 records – page 1 of 29.