Skip header and navigation

Refine By

36 records – page 1 of 4.

Abdominal aortic diameter is increased in males with a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysms: results from the Danish VIVA-trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260407
Source
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2014 Dec;48(6):669-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
T M M Joergensen
K. Houlind
A. Green
J S Lindholt
Source
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2014 Dec;48(6):669-75
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aorta, Abdominal - ultrasonography
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - epidemiology - genetics - ultrasonography
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dilatation, Pathologic
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Heredity
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Pedigree
Phenotype
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Registries
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
To investigate, at a population level, whether a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is independently related to increased aortic diameter and prevalence of AAA in men, and to elucidate whether the mean aortic diameter and the prevalence of AAA are different between participants with male and female relatives with AAA.
Observational population-based cross-sectional study.
18,614 male participants screened for AAA in the VIVA-trial 2008-2011 with information on both family history of AAA and maximal aortic diameter.
Standardized ultrasound scan measurement of maximum antero-posterior aortic diameter. Family history obtained by questionnaire. Multivariate regression analysis was used to test for confounders: age, sex, smoking, comorbidity and medication.
From the screened cohort, 569 participants had at least one first degree relative diagnosed with AAA, and 38 had AAA. Participants with a family history of AAA (+FH) had a significantly larger mean maximum aortic diameter (20.50 mm) compared with participants without family history of AAA (-FH) (19.07 mm, p
PubMed ID
25443525 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abdominal plain film findings in acute ischemic bowel disease differ with age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82474
Source
Acta Radiol. 2006 Apr;47(3):238-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Wadman M.
Syk I.
Elmståhl B.
Ekberg O.
Elmståhl S.
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Section of Geriatric Medicine, Lund University, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. maria.wadman@skane.se
Source
Acta Radiol. 2006 Apr;47(3):238-43
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Dilatation, Pathologic - radiography
Female
Gases
Humans
Intestines - blood supply - physiology - radiography
Ischemia - radiography
Male
Middle Aged
Radiography, Abdominal
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
PURPOSE: To evaluate the use and findings of abdominal plain film in acute ischemic bowel disease (AIBD) in different age subsets, and to correlate the clinical findings. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Eighty-nine radiographically examined patients with AIBD at Malmö University Hospital, Sweden between 1987 and 1996. RESULTS: In 89%, the plain film displayed pathologic signs. Bowel dilatation was more common in the elderly. Of 68 patients aged > or = 71 years, 19 (28%) had colon gas/fluid levels with/without colon dilatation, and of 19 patients > 84 years 16 (84%) had small-bowel dilatation. Of 20 patients aged or = 71 years (P = 0.001). Of the patients with diarrhea, 13 of 33 (40%) had colon gas/fluid levels with/without colon dilatation compared to 2 of 29 (7%) without (P = 0.003). In the elderly (> or = 71 years), 48 of 53 (91%) patients with bowel dilatation on plain film died, compared to 11 out of 16 (69%) without this finding (P
PubMed ID
16613303 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age at detection of abdominal aortic aneurysms in siblings of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275171
Source
J Vasc Surg. 2016 Apr;63(4):883-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Anneli Linné
Johan Forsberg
David Lindström
Ester Ideskog
Rebecka Hultgren
Source
J Vasc Surg. 2016 Apr;63(4):883-7
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aorta, Abdominal - ultrasonography
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - epidemiology - genetics - ultrasonography
Dilatation, Pathologic
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Heredity
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Middle Aged
Pedigree
Phenotype
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Siblings
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Few countries offer organized screening of siblings of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), although a hereditary trait is well known to exist. Male relatives, but not female, are invited within the population-based screening programs for elderly men in Sweden. Evidence regarding the optimal age to screen siblings is scarce. The aim of this study was to describe the age at detection in siblings found with AAAs.
All patients treated for AAAs in two Swedish counties were screened for siblings. Consenting siblings aged 80 and younger were examined (N = 529) with ultrasound and were interviewed per protocol.
In the cohort of 529 siblings to AAA patients, 53 siblings were diagnosed with AAAs (sisters 16/276 [5.8%] and brothers 37/253 [14.6%]). The prevalence of AAAs in the siblings 65 years of age or younger was 16/207 (7.7%). One-third of the siblings found with AAAs were young (16/53 [30%]). Among the young siblings with AAAs, 8/16 (50%) had an aneurysm larger than 50 mm or were already surgically treated. The prevalence of AAAs in siblings older than 65 years of age was 37/322 (12%).
The AAA prevalence in this sibling cohort is strikingly high compared to the prevalence in the population (in Sweden, 1.4%-2.2% in 65-year-old men). The young ages among diagnosed siblings reinforce that male siblings of AAA patients should be screened before age 65 (before the population-based program) and that structured programs for female siblings are called for.
PubMed ID
26826057 View in PubMed
Less detail

An echocardiographic evaluation of patients with idiopathic heart failure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54794
Source
Chest. 1995 Mar;107(3):680-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1995
Author
B. Andersson
K. Caidahl
F. Waagstein
Author Affiliation
Wallenberg Laboratory for Cardiovascular Research, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg University, Sweden.
Source
Chest. 1995 Mar;107(3):680-9
Date
Mar-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cardiomyopathy, Dilated - ultrasonography
Diastole - physiology
Dilatation, Pathologic
Echocardiography
Female
Heart Failure, Congestive - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Sensitivity and specificity
Stroke Volume
Systole - physiology
Ventricular Dysfunction, Left - ultrasonography
Abstract
The primary myocardial disease idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDCM) is not clearly defined in the literature. The description is both morphologic and etiologic. We examined consecutive patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) of unknown cause to identify possible cases of IDCM and to give a detailed description of echocardiographic data and possible diastolic dysfunction in this group. The hospital records of patients aged 16 to 65 years hospitalized due to CHF or IDCM during a 6-year period (N = 2,711) were evaluated in a defined region of western Sweden. Twenty-two percent (584/2,711) of these records contained no plausible cause of CHF or IDCM, and among patients being alive, obvious cause was lacking in 411 of 1,516 (27%). These 411 patients were offered a diagnostic investigation, including echocardiography, and they were compared with a randomly selected control group (n = 103) from the general population. Of 411 patients, 293 accepted investigation. From the control group, we defined the reference level for left ventricular (LV) dilatation to be > 32 mm/m2, and reduced ejection fraction according to Teichholz formula to be
PubMed ID
7874937 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Antegrade diastolic blood flow and classic reflux in varicose dilatation of the intersaphenous vein].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275525
Source
Angiol Sosud Khir. 2016;22(2):101-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
E V Shaidakov
D A Rosukhovsky
A G Grigoryan
V L Bulatov
E A Ilyukhin
Source
Angiol Sosud Khir. 2016;22(2):101-8
Date
2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diastole
Dilatation, Pathologic - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Female
Hemodynamics
Humans
Leg - blood supply
Male
Prevalence
Regional Blood Flow
Russia
Saphenous Vein - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Severity of Illness Index
Ultrasonography, Doppler, Duplex - methods
Varicose Veins - complications - diagnosis - physiopathology
Venous Insufficiency - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Abstract
In the intersaphenous vein (ISV) there may take place the so-called "antegrade" or "paradoxical" reflux. This type of blood flow is revealed in a series of patients during muscular diastole and is a link of the pathogenesis of varicose disease, but has, as distinct from the "classical" reflux, an antegrade direction. An incompetent saphenopopliteal junction (SPJ) is a source of the antegrade diastolic blood flow (ADBF) through the ISV. Descriptions of possible variants of impaired blood flow through the ISV are fragmentary and their interpretations are controversial. Prevalence and pathogenesis of these disorders impairments have not yet been studied.
A cross-sectional study: over 4 years three centres examined a total of 1,413 patients diagnosed with class C2-C6 varicose veins according the CEAP classification. All patients underwent ultrasound duplex scanning of lower limb veins. The ADBF was determined as a unidirectional antegrade blood flow with the duration of not more than 0.5 second, observed after the crus was relived of compression (in the diastole). Of the patients included into the study who had no varicose veins on the contralateral extremity with the ISV being spotted we sequentially selected 40 subjects including them into the Study Group for the analysis of blood flow and the diameter of the ISV in health.
Impairments of blood flow in the ISV were revealed in 61 (4.8%) of 1,265 extremities included into the study: the "classical" reflux in 9 (14.8%) limbs, ADBF was revealed in 37 (60.7%) limbs, a combination of the "classical" blood flow and ADBF - in 15 (24.6%) limbs. Hence, the patients were subdivided into three groups. Studying the nature of blood flow through the ISV in the control group on 40 lower limbs revealed no blood flow disorders. The mean ISV diameter amounted to 1.68 mm (ME=1 mm). The ISV diameter was considerably higher in all studied groups as compared with the control one (p
PubMed ID
27336341 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aortic diameter at age 65 in men with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285510
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2017 Aug;51(4):202-206
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2017
Author
Soumia Taimour
Moncef Zarrouk
Jan Holst
Anders H Rosengren
Leif Groop
Peter M Nilsson
Anders Gottsäter
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2017 Aug;51(4):202-206
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aorta, Abdominal - diagnostic imaging
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology - prevention & control
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Dilatation, Pathologic
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Prevalence
Protective factors
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Ultrasonography
Abstract
Type 2 diabetes mellitus has been linked to a decreased risk for abdominal aortic aneurysm (aortic diameter =30?mm, AAA) development in men. The aim of this study was to evaluate if such an effect is detectable already around the time of diabetes diagnosis.
We cross-sectionally compared aortic diameter at ultrasound screening for AAA in 691 men aged 65 years with incipient or newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes (group A) with 18,262 65-year old control men without diabetes (group B).
Aortic diameter did not differ between groups (18.8[17.4-20.8] vs. 19.0[17.5-28.7] mm; p?=?0.43). AAA prevalence was 2.5% in group A and 1.5% in group B (p?=?.010). In logistic regression taking group differences in body mass index (BMI), smoking, presence of atherosclerotic disease and hypertension into account, the difference in AAA prevalence was no longer significant (p?=?.15). Among men in group A, C-peptide (r?=?.093; p?=?.034), but not HbA1c (r?=?.060; p?=?.24) correlated with aortic diameter.
Among 65 year old men aortic diameter and AAA prevalence do not differ between those with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes and those without diabetes. Putative protective effects of type 2 diabetes mellitus against aortic dilatation and AAA development therefore probably occur later after diagnosis of diabetes.
PubMed ID
28434285 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aortic dilatation after endovascular repair of blunt traumatic thoracic aortic injuries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143862
Source
J Vasc Surg. 2010 Jul;52(1):45-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Thomas L Forbes
Jeremy R Harris
D Kirk Lawlor
Guy Derose
Author Affiliation
Division of Vascular Surgery, London Health Sciences Centre & The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada. Tom.Forbes@lhsc.on.ca
Source
J Vasc Surg. 2010 Jul;52(1):45-8
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aorta, Thoracic - injuries - radiography - surgery
Aortic Aneurysm, Thoracic - etiology - radiography
Aortography - methods
Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation - adverse effects
Dilatation, Pathologic
Humans
Middle Aged
Ontario
Thoracic Injuries - radiography - surgery
Time Factors
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Treatment Outcome
Wounds, Nonpenetrating - radiography - surgery
Young Adult
Abstract
Endovascular repair of blunt traumatic thoracic aortic injuries (BTAI) has become routine at many trauma centers despite concerns regarding durability and aortic dilatation in these predominantly young patients. These concerns prompted this examination of thoracic aortic expansion after endovascular repair of a BTAI.
The immediate postoperative and most recent computed tomography (CT) scans of patients who had undergone urgent endovascular repair of a BTAI and had at least 1 year of follow-up were reviewed. Diameter measurements were made at four predetermined sites: immediately proximal to the left subclavian artery (D1), immediately distal to the left subclavian artery (D2), distal extent of the endograft (D3), and 15 mm beyond the distal end of the endograft (D4). Split screens permitted direct comparison of measurements between CTs at the corresponding levels.
During a 6-year period (2001-2007), 21 patients (mean age, 42.9 years; range, 19-81 years) underwent endovascular repair of a BTAI, 17 with at least 1 year of follow-up (mean, 2.6 years; range, 1-5.5 years). No patients required reintervention during this period. The mean rate of dilatation for each level of the thoracic aorta in mm/year was: D1, 0.74 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.42-1.06); D2, 0.83 (95% CI, 0.55-1.11); D3, 0.63 (95% CI, 0.37-0.89); D4, 0.47 (95% CI, 0.27-0.67). The rate of expansion of D2 differed significantly vs D4 (P = .025).
During the first several years of follow-up, the proximal thoracic aorta dilates minimally after endovascular repair of BTAIs, with the segment just distal to the left subclavian artery expanding at a slightly greater rate. Longer-term follow-up is necessary to determine whether this expansion continues and becomes clinically significant.
PubMed ID
20434299 View in PubMed
Less detail

Ascending aortic dilatation is rarely associated with coronary artery disease regardless of aortic valve morphology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260036
Source
J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2014 Dec;148(6):2973-80.e1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Veronica Jackson
Maria J Eriksson
Kenneth Caidahl
Per Eriksson
Anders Franco-Cereceda
Source
J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2014 Dec;148(6):2973-80.e1
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aortic Aneurysm - diagnosis - epidemiology - surgery
Aortic Valve - abnormalities - surgery
Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation
Coronary Artery Bypass
Coronary Artery Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - surgery
Dilatation, Pathologic
Female
Heart Valve Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - surgery
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Differences in clinical presentation between patients with tricuspid aortic valves (TAVs) or bicuspid aortic valves (BAVs) and aortic valve disease are evident. Whether these differences can be attributed to differences in cardiovascular risks remains uncertain.
Patient characteristics, echocardiographic findings, medical history, medication, and laboratory findings were evaluated in 702 patients with aortic valve and/or ascending aortic pathology; 202 also had concomitant coronary artery disease.
A BAV was commonly found in patients with isolated valve disease (BAV 47%, TAV 53%) and frequently associated with ascending aortic dilatation (BAV 80%, TAV 20%). In patients with coronary artery disease, a TAV was commonly found (TAV 84%, BAV 16%). The combination of ascending aortic dilatation and coronary artery disease was markedly rare regardless of valve morphology (TAV, 7 out of 38; BAV, 6 out of 127). The distribution of valve pathology and clinical parameters was similar in patients with TAV and BAV with coronary artery disease (P = .12). Without coronary artery disease, parameters associated with cardiovascular risks were more often seen in patients with TAV than in patients with BAV (P = .0001).
Coronary artery disease is uncommon in surgical patients with BAV, but it is associated with TAV, advanced age, and male gender. Coronary artery disease and ascending aortic dilatation rarely coexist, regardless of valve phenotype. Differences in the prevalence of coronary artery disease or ascending aortic dilatation between patients with TAV and BAV are not explained by differences in cardiovascular risks or the distribution of valve pathology.
PubMed ID
25242056 View in PubMed
Less detail

36 records – page 1 of 4.