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8 records – page 1 of 1.

Deleterious effects of repeated cold exposure in a freeze-tolerant sub-Antarctic caterpillar.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95808
Source
J Exp Biol. 2005 Mar;208(Pt 5):869-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Sinclair Brent J
Chown Steven L
Author Affiliation
Spatial, Physiological and Conservation Ecology Group, Department of Botany and Zoology, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602, South Africa. celatoblatta@yahoo.co.uk
Source
J Exp Biol. 2005 Mar;208(Pt 5):869-79
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acclimatization - physiology
Analysis of Variance
Animals
Body Composition
Body Weight
Climate
Crystallization
Digestive System - pathology
Feeding Behavior - physiology
Freezing
Indian Ocean Islands
Larva - physiology
Moths - physiology
Abstract
Multiple freeze-thaw cycles are common in alpine, polar and temperate habitats. We investigated the effects of five consecutive cycles of approx. -5 degrees C on the freeze-tolerant larvae of Pringleophaga marioni Viette (Lepidoptera: Tineidae) on sub-Antarctic Marion Island. The likelihood of freezing was positively correlated with body mass, and decreased from 70% of caterpillars that froze on initial exposure to 55% of caterpillars that froze on subsequent exposures; however, caterpillars retained their freeze tolerance and did not appear to switch to a freeze-avoiding strategy. Apart from an increase in gut water, there was no difference in body composition of caterpillars frozen 0 to 5 times, suggesting that the observed effects were not due to freezing, but rather to exposure to cold per se. Repeated cold exposure did not result in mortality, but led to decreased mass, largely accounted for by a decreased gut mass caused by cessation of feeding by caterpillars. Treatment caterpillars had fragile guts with increased lipid content, suggesting damage to the gut epithelium. These effects persisted for 5 days after the final exposure to cold, and after 30 days, treatment caterpillars had regained their pre-exposure mass, whereas their control counterparts had significantly gained mass. We show that repeated cold exposure does occur in the field, and suggest that this may be responsible for the long life cycle in P. marioni. Although mean temperatures are increasing on Marion Island, several climate change scenarios predict an increase in exposures to sub-zero temperatures, which would result in an increased generation time for P. marioni. Coupled with increased predation from introduced house mice on Marion Island, this could have severe consequences for the P. marioni population.
PubMed ID
15755885 View in PubMed
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Nursing sickness in lactating mink (Mustela vison). I. Epidemiological and pathological observations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62163
Source
Can J Vet Res. 1992 Apr;56(2):89-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1992
Author
T N Clausen
C R Olesen
O. Hansen
S. Wamberg
Author Affiliation
Fur Research Farm West, Holstebro, Denmark.
Source
Can J Vet Res. 1992 Apr;56(2):89-94
Date
Apr-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - pathology
Animals
Body Weight
Denmark - epidemiology
Digestive System - pathology
Female
Incidence
Kidney - pathology
Lactation Disorders - epidemiology - pathology - veterinary
Litter Size
Liver - pathology
Male
Mammary Glands, Animal - pathology
Mink
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Weaning
Abstract
In a retrospective survey, the epidemiological characteristics of nursing sickness in Standard Black and Pastel mink (Mustela vison) were examined in a Danish fur research farm. Based on the clinical diagnosis of the disease, the overall morbidity in a total of 1774 lactating females amounted to 14.4% and the case fatality rate to 7.8%. Apparently healthy females weaned an average of 5.0 kits per litter, while dams suffering from nursing sickness raised and weaned an average of 5.4 kits per litter (p less than 0.01). Based on logistic regression analysis, the increasing age of the lactating dam, followed by littersize and female weight loss, appeared to be major determinants for the development of nursing sickness. The impact of additional covariates such as litter weight gain and female color type were remarkably low. At weaning (day 43) the mean individual live weight of the kits of either sex did not differ between healthy and sick dams. In Standard Black, the total biomass of the offspring raised by sick dams was significantly larger than that of the healthy controls (p less than 0.01). During the final two weeks of lactation, apparently healthy dams lost on average 14% of their body mass, whereas those affected by nursing sickness had a mean weight loss of about 31% (p less than 0.001). Postmortem examination of 25 dams with severe nursing sickness verified the clinical findings of progressive dehydration and emaciation. The gastrointestinal tract was empty and gastric ulcers and melaena were frequently present. Other common findings included small livers,enlarged adrenals and pitted kidneys.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
1591661 View in PubMed
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Patho-anatomical studies in patients dying of AIDS.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8764
Source
Acta Pathol Microbiol Immunol Scand [A]. 1986 May;94(3):201-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1986
Author
S. Laulund
J. Visfeldt
L. Klinken
Source
Acta Pathol Microbiol Immunol Scand [A]. 1986 May;94(3):201-21
Date
May-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - microbiology - pathology
Adrenal Glands - pathology
Adult
Autopsy - methods
Bone Marrow - pathology
Central Nervous System - pathology
Digestive System - pathology
Female
Humans
Liver - pathology
Lung - pathology
Lymph Nodes - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Spleen - pathology
Abstract
The incidence of AIDS in Denmark is the highest reported among the countries of Western Europe. This preliminary account is a report of the autopsy findings in 10 patients, 9 homosexual men and 1 woman. Our aim is to provide a detailed description of the patho-anatomical findings, as well as to compare these with corresponding results reported from the United States, with a view to establishing possible geographical differences in the disease picture. The results of the patho-anatomical studies correspond in all essentials to those from the United States. However, it must be stated that no malignant lymphomas were demonstrated in our patients, although the disease can give rise to very pronounced, possibly transitory, lesions in the lymphatic tissue, easily misinterpreted as malignant. Further features that should be emphasized are the often widespread mycobacterial infection found in the intestinal wall in protracted cases, the occurrence of CMV vasculitis, particularly in the adrenal cortex and medulla, and thromboembolic lesions, often demonstrated in a variety of tissues. The studies made so far emphasize the importance of autopsy in AIDS deaths, as it has extended our detailed knowledge of the patho-anatomical lesions associated with certain opportunistic infections. Further, the autopsy findings have been demonstrably significant either for confirming or for rejecting the clinical diagnosis. On the basis of an analysis of the cellular immunological profile in AIDS, parallels can be drawn to the conditions in certain lymphoproliferative diseases. In autopsied AIDS cases, we recommend a standard scheme covering the tissue specimens to be obtained for histological examination. Strict safety precautions should be observed against infection during autopsy.
PubMed ID
3728019 View in PubMed
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Pathology, mortality and prognosis of burns: a review of 54 critical and fatal cases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature111147
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1967 Aug 26;97(9):445-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-26-1967
Author
R V Argamaso
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1967 Aug 26;97(9):445-9
Date
Aug-26-1967
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adrenal Glands - pathology
Adult
Aged
Brain - pathology
Burns - mortality - pathology
Child
Child, Preschool
Digestive System - pathology
Female
Humans
Infant
Infection - etiology
Kidney - pathology
Liver - pathology
Male
Manitoba
Middle Aged
Myocardium - pathology
Prognosis
Respiratory System - pathology
Notes
Cites: AMA Arch Surg. 1957 Jul;75(1):17-2013434583
Cites: Ann Surg. 1960 Nov;152:767-7613735285
Cites: Circ Res. 1962 Oct;11:669-7313935040
Cites: Arch Surg. 1963 Dec;87:937-4814063826
Cites: Am J Surg. 1964 Nov;108:649-5414225949
Cites: Plast Reconstr Surg. 1965 Apr;35:391-40014265363
Cites: Ann Surg. 1965 Apr;161:497-50114274851
Cites: Surgery. 1950 Jul;28(1):123-5815442797
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1964 May 7;270:983-714122794
Cites: Am J Physiol. 1960 May;198:1041-313815790
PubMed ID
6034711 View in PubMed
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[Pathology of anthrax sepsis according to materials of the infectious outbreak in 1979 in Sverdlovsk (macroscopic changes)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222478
Source
Arkh Patol. 1993 Jan-Feb;55(1):12-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
A A Abramova
L M Grinberg
Source
Arkh Patol. 1993 Jan-Feb;55(1):12-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anthrax - complications - epidemiology - pathology
Central Nervous System - pathology
Digestive System - pathology
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Respiratory System - pathology
Russia - epidemiology
Sepsis - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Abstract
Obligatory findings in 42 postmortem observation of anthrax were hemorrhagic alterations of the intrathoracic lymph nodes and mediastinum. Hemorrhagic alterations in the respiratory organs, digestive tract, brain and meninges were also found macroscopically.
PubMed ID
7980032 View in PubMed
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[Pathology of anthrax sepsis according to materials of the infectious outbreak in 1979 in Sverdlovsk (microscopic changes)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222477
Source
Arkh Patol. 1993 Jan-Feb;55(1):18-23
Publication Type
Article
Author
A A Abramova
L M Grinberg
Source
Arkh Patol. 1993 Jan-Feb;55(1):18-23
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthrax - complications - epidemiology - pathology
Central Nervous System - pathology
Digestive System - pathology
Disease Outbreaks
Humans
Inflammation - etiology - pathology
Lymph Nodes - pathology
Necrosis
Respiratory System - pathology
Russia - epidemiology
Sepsis - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Viscera - pathology
Abstract
Histologic studies of 42 cases of anthrax revealed that serous-hemorrhagic, hemorrhagic and hemorrhagic-necrotic inflammation was a substrate of macroscopic changes. Morphological characteristics of alterations in the respiratory organs, lymph nodes and mediastinum, digestive tract and liver, spleen, kidneys, brain and meninges are presented.
PubMed ID
7980033 View in PubMed
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[Pathology of anthrax sepsis according to materials of the infectious outbreak in 1979 in Sverdlovsk (various aspects of morpho-, patho- and thanatogenesis)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222476
Source
Arkh Patol. 1993 Jan-Feb;55(1):23-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
L M Grinberg
A A Abramova
Source
Arkh Patol. 1993 Jan-Feb;55(1):23-6
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthrax - complications - epidemiology - pathology
Central Nervous System - pathology
Digestive System - pathology
Disease Outbreaks
Hemorrhage - etiology - pathology
Humans
Lung - pathology
Lymphadenitis - etiology - pathology
Russia - epidemiology
Sepsis - epidemiology - pathology
Thanatology
Abstract
Hemorrhagic lymphadenitis of the intrathoracic lymph nodes and mediastinitis are shown to be the primary septical focus, this indicating an inhalation route of the contamination with development of pulmonary anthrax. The alterations in the gastrointestinal tract and central nervous system are considered to be secondary resulting from lymphohematogenic generalization of the anthraxic sepsis. The attention is drawn to the morphological signs of the immunodepression and the inhibition of granulocytic reaction. It is noted that the epidemic outburst of the pulmonary anthrax is without analogs and its development may be the result only of a massive penetration of bacteria into the atmosphere.
PubMed ID
7980034 View in PubMed
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Quebec beer-drinkers' cardiomyopathy: pathological studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature111073
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1967 Oct 7;97(15):910-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-7-1967
Author
J L Bonenfant
G. Miller
P E Roy
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1967 Oct 7;97(15):910-6
Date
Oct-7-1967
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - complications
Beer - poisoning
Cardiomyopathies - pathology
Cardiovascular System - pathology
Digestive System - pathology
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Humans
Liver - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardium - pathology
Organ Size
Quebec
Thyroid Gland - pathology
Notes
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1967 Oct 7;97(15):916-216051262
Cites: Am J Pathol. 1951 Jan-Feb;27(1):85-9314799616
Cites: J Pathol Bacteriol. 1950 Oct;62(4):653-414804244
Cites: J Pathol Bacteriol. 1951 Jul;63(3):503-1214874166
Cites: Dis Chest. 1957 Jan;31(1):84-9213384174
Cites: Physiol Rev. 1960 Jul;40:505-3713834511
Cites: Acta Med Scand. 1961 Oct;170:479-8613876584
Cites: Am J Clin Pathol. 1963 Apr;39:365-7313933079
Cites: Am Heart J. 1963 Sep;66:389-9514056789
Cites: JAMA. 1965 Jan 4;191:33-714222970
Cites: Circulation. 1965 Jan;31:19-4114247526
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 1965 Jul;16:137-4114314199
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1965 Jul 17;93:103-714317452
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 1960 May;5:619-2713836289
Cites: Am Heart J. 1965 Jun;69:748-6514296641
Cites: Physiol Rev. 1965 Apr;45:171-21314302909
PubMed ID
6051261 View in PubMed
Less detail

8 records – page 1 of 1.