Skip header and navigation

Refine By

537 records – page 1 of 54.

Academic Alternate Relationship Plans for internal medicine: a lever for health care transformation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129973
Source
Open Med. 2011;5(1):e28-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Allison Bichel
Maria Bacchus
Jon Meddings
John Conly
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Calgary Health Region, and University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta.
Source
Open Med. 2011;5(1):e28-32
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Diffusion of Innovation
Health Care Reform - methods
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Internal Medicine - education
Poisson Distribution
Program Development
Schools, Medical - organization & administration - trends
Notes
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2000 Jul;46:1438-4410925758
Cites: Can Respir J. 2009 Mar-Apr;16(2):49-5419399308
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2008 Mar;24(3):195-818340388
Cites: CMAJ. 1999 Jun 15;160(12):1710-410410632
PubMed ID
22046217 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accelerating client-driven care: pilot study for a social interaction approach to knowledge translation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155589
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2008 Jun;40(2):58-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Carol L McWilliam
Anita Kothari
Beverly Leipert
Catherine Ward-Griffin
Dorothy Forbes
Mary Lou King
Marita Kloseck
Karen Ferguson
Abram Oudshoorn
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada. cmcwill@uwo.ca
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2008 Jun;40(2):58-74
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Consumer Participation
Diffusion of Innovation
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Group Processes
Health Planning Councils
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Middle Aged
Ontario
Pilot Projects
Abstract
This study piloted a knowledge translation (KT) intervention promoting evidence-based home care through social interaction. A total of 33 providers organized into 5 heterogeneous, geographically defined action groups participated in 5 researcher-facilitated meetings based on the participatory action model. The KT evidence reflects an empowering partnership approach to service delivery. Exploratory investigation included quantitative pre-post measurement of outcomes and qualitative description of data, presented herein. The critical reflections of the groups reveal macro-, meso-, and micro-level barriers to and facilitators of KT as well as recommendations for achieving KT. Insights gleaned from the findings have informed the evolution of the KT intervention to engage all 3 levels in addressing barriers and facilitators, with a conscious effort to transcend "push" and "pull" tendencies and enact transformative leadership. The findings suggest the merit of a more prolonged longitudinal investigation with expanded participation.
PubMed ID
18714898 View in PubMed
Less detail

Actor-network theory: a tool to support ethical analysis of commercial genetic testing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180338
Source
New Genet Soc. 2003 Dec;22(3):271-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Bryn Williams-Jones
Janice E Graham
Author Affiliation
Centre for Family Research & Homerton College, University of Cambridge, UK.
Source
New Genet Soc. 2003 Dec;22(3):271-96
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - genetics
Canada
Diffusion of Innovation
Female
Genes, BRCA1
Genes, BRCA2
Genetic Counseling
Genetic Research
Genetic Services - economics - ethics - trends
Genetic Testing - economics - ethics - methods
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Industry
Internationality
Marketing
Models, organizational
Patents as Topic
Private Sector
Public Policy
Public Sector
Research Support as Topic
Sensitivity and specificity
Technology Assessment, Biomedical
Technology Transfer
Abstract
Social, ethical and policy analysis of the issues arising from gene patenting and commercial genetic testing is enhanced by the application of science and technology studies, and Actor-Network Theory (ANT) in particular. We suggest the potential for transferring ANT's flexible nature to an applied heuristic methodology for gathering empirical information and for analysing the complex networks involved in the development of genetic technologies. Three concepts are explored in this paper--actor-networks, translation, and drift--and applied to the case of Myriad Genetics and their commercial BRACAnalysis genetic susceptibility test for hereditary breast cancer. Treating this test as an active participant in socio-technical networks clarifies the extent to which it interacts with, shapes and is shaped by people, other technologies, and institutions. Such an understanding enables more sophisticated and nuanced technology assessment, academic analysis, as well as public debate about the social, ethical and policy implications of the commercialization of new genetic technologies.
PubMed ID
15115034 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adopting and introducing new technology to improve patient care: a wedding of clinicians and informatics specialists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151428
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2009;143:343-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Jeff Barnett
Ann Syme
Author Affiliation
BC Cancer Agency, Victoria, BC, Canada. jeff.barnett@bccancer.bc.ca
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2009;143:343-7
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Cooperative Behavior
Diffusion of Innovation
Health Personnel
Humans
Information Services
Medical Informatics
Pain - drug therapy
Palliative Care
Patient Care - standards
Abstract
The BC Cancer Agency sees 128,172 patients per year, of which 2,186 are referred to the Patient Symptom Management/Palliative Care (PSMPC) clinics for tertiary symptom management. Other than at the PSMPC clinics, screening for symptom distress is extremely variable because there is no systematic assessment protocol. In a recent audit of patients coming to the Cancer Agency, approximately 64% of patients reported experiencing a moderate to severe level of symptom distress. Of the total patients in the audit (n = 1,147), only 18 were seen by the PSMPC teams and it is unclear whether or not the remaining patients had their symptoms attended to by a health professional at the BCCA.The tool which the BCCA has chosen for screening and assessment is the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS), which was developed by Dr. Eduardo Bruera. ESAS is a nine-item, self-reporting, visual analogue instrument used to measure pain and other symptoms using numeric ratings. Cancer Care Ontario (CCO) has developed an electronic means whereby patients' ESAS scores are entered and housed in an electronic health record and then used for triage. BCCA is in partnership with CCO to adapt this system for use in BC.
PubMed ID
19380958 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adopting electronic medical records: are they just electronic paper records?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108722
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2013 Jul;59(7):e322-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Morgan Price
Alex Singer
Julie Kim
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Practice, University of British Columbia, Vancouver. morgan@leadlab.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2013 Jul;59(7):e322-9
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decision Making, Computer-Assisted
Diffusion of Innovation
Electronic Health Records - utilization
Humans
Manitoba
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Practice Management, Medical - organization & administration
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Qualitative Research
Abstract
To understand the key challenges to adoption of advanced features of electronic medical records (EMRs) in office practice, and to better understand these challenges in a Canadian context.
Mixed-methods study.
Manitoba.
Health care providers and staff in 5 primary care offices.
Level of EMR adoption was assessed, and field notes from interviews and discussion groups were qualitatively analyzed for common challenges and themes across all sites.
Fifty-seven interviews and 4 discussion groups were conducted from November 2011 to January 2012. Electronic medical record adoption scores ranged from 2.3 to 3.0 (out of a theoretical maximum of 5). Practices often scored lower than expected on use of decision support, providing patients with access to their own data, and use of practice-reporting tools. Qualitative analysis showed there were ceiling effects to EMR adoption owing to how the EMR was implemented, the supporting eHealth infrastructure, lack of awareness or availability of EMR functionality, and poor EMR data quality.
Many practitioners used their EMRs as "electronic paper records" and were not using advanced features of their EMRs that could further enhance practice. Data-quality issues within the EMRs could affect future attempts at using these features. Education and quality improvement activities to support data quality and EMR optimization are likely needed to support practices in maximizing their use of EMRs.
Notes
Cites: PLoS Med. 2011;8(1):e100038721267058
Cites: Stud Health Technol Inform. 2011;164:385-9121335741
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2011 Oct;57(10):e390-721998247
Cites: Healthc Manage Forum. 2011 Autumn;24(3):137-40; discussion 147-822165572
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2012 Jan;58(1):e2122267635
Cites: BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2012;12:1022364529
Cites: J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2010 Nov-Dec;17(6):637-4520962125
Cites: Am J Med. 2003 Apr 1;114(5):397-40312714130
Cites: BMJ. 2003 May 17;326(7398):107012750210
Cites: Health Aff (Millwood). 2004 Mar-Apr;23(2):116-2615046136
Cites: Ann Fam Med. 2005 Jul-Aug;3(4):300-616046561
Cites: Health Aff (Millwood). 2005 Sep-Oct;24(5):1103-1716162551
Cites: J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2007 Jan-Feb;14(1):29-4017068355
Cites: AMIA Annu Symp Proc. 2006;:394-817238370
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2008 May;54(5):730-618474707
Cites: AMIA Annu Symp Proc. 2007;:94-818693805
Cites: J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2008 Sep-Oct;15(5):575-8018579839
Cites: Int J Med Inform. 2009 Jan;78(1):22-3118644745
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 2010 Mar;25(3):177-8520033621
PubMed ID
23851560 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adopting information technology in hospitals: the relationship between attitudes/expectations and behavior.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217142
Source
Hosp Health Serv Adm. 1994;39(3):369-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
M. Hebert
I. Benbasat
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Hosp Health Serv Adm. 1994;39(3):369-83
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Attitude to Computers
Communication
Diffusion of Innovation
Hospital Bed Capacity, 300 to 499
Humans
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Research Design
Technology Transfer
Abstract
The purpose of this field study was to measure the influence of three factors on the adoption of information technology in a health care setting--namely, attitudes toward using the technology, subjective norms or beliefs about others' expectations, and perceived voluntariness. Approximately 77 percent of the variance of intent to use the technology was explained by three attitude variables (beliefs related to perceived relative advantage and compatibility with previous work patterns as well as result demonstrability), and one variable associated with subjective norms (influence of a senior policymaker, the director of nursing). Use of this model may provide insights for administrators managing the process of information technology implementation in health care.
PubMed ID
10137056 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adopting new medical technologies in Russian hospitals: what causes inefficiency? (qualitative study).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294591
Source
Health Econ Policy Law. 2018 Jan; 13(1):33-49
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2018
Author
Sergey Shishkin
Liudmila Zasimova
Author Affiliation
1Director,Center for Health Policy,National Research University Higher School of Economics,Moscow,Russia.
Source
Health Econ Policy Law. 2018 Jan; 13(1):33-49
Date
Jan-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Biomedical Technology
Decision Making
Diffusion of Innovation
Efficiency, Organizational
Faculty, Medical
Hospital Administrators
Hospitals
Humans
Russia
Abstract
The adoption of new medical technologies often generates losses in efficiency associated with the excess or insufficient acquisition of new equipment, an inappropriate choice (in terms of economic and clinical parameters) of medical equipment, and its poor use. Russia is a good example for exploring the problem of the ineffective adoption of new medical technologies due to the massive public investment in new equipment for medical institutions in 2006-2013. This study examines the procurement of new technologies in Russian hospitals to find the main causes of inefficiency. The research strategy was based on in-depth semistructured interviews with representatives of prominent actors (regional health care authorities, hospital executives, senior physicians). The main result is that inefficiencies arise from the contradiction between hospitals' and authorities' motivation for acquiring new technologies: hospitals tend to adopt technologies which bring benefits to their department heads and physicians and minimize maintenance and servicing costs, while the authorities' main concern is the initial cost of the technology.
PubMed ID
28249636 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adoption of an innovation to repair aortic aneurysms at a Canadian hospital: a qualitative case study and evaluation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160317
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2007;7:182
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Nathalie M Danjoux
Douglas K Martin
Pascale N Lehoux
Julie L Harnish
Randi Zlotnik Shaul
Mark Bernstein
David R Urbach
Author Affiliation
Department of Health, Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. nathalie.danjoux@utoronto.ca
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2007;7:182
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers - organization & administration
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - surgery
Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation - methods - utilization
Decision Making, Organizational
Diffusion of Innovation
Hospitals, Urban - organization & administration
Humans
Ontario
Organizational Case Studies
Organizational Innovation
Qualitative Research
Vascular Surgical Procedures - methods - utilization
Abstract
Priority setting in health care is a challenge because demand for services exceeds available resources. The increasing demand for less invasive surgical procedures by patients, health care institutions and industry, places added pressure on surgeons to acquire the appropriate skills to adopt innovative procedures. Such innovations are often initiated and introduced by surgeons in the hospital setting. Decision-making processes for the adoption of surgical innovations in hospitals have not been well studied and a standard process for their introduction does not exist. The purpose of this study is to describe and evaluate the decision-making process for the adoption of a new technology for repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (endovascular aneurysm repair [EVAR]) in an academic health sciences centre to better understand how decisions are made for the introduction of surgical innovations at the hospital level.
A qualitative case study of the decision to adopt EVAR was conducted using a modified thematic analysis of documents and semi-structured interviews. Accountability for Reasonableness was used as a conceptual framework for fairness in priority setting processes in health care organizations.
There were two key decisions regarding EVAR: the decision to adopt the new technology in the hospital and the decision to stop hospital funding. The decision to adopt EVAR was based on perceived improved patient outcomes, safety, and the surgeons' desire to innovate. This decision involved very few stakeholders. The decision to stop funding of EVAR involved all key players and was based on criteria apparent to all those involved, including cost, evidence and hospital priorities. Limited internal communications were made prior to adopting the technology. There was no formal means to appeal the decisions made.
The analysis yielded recommendations for improving future decisions about the adoption of surgical innovations. ese empirical findings will be used with other case studies to help develop guidelines to help decision-makers adopt surgical innovations in Canadian hospitals.
Notes
Cites: Health Technol Assess. 2001;5(12):1-7911319991
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2005 Mar 3;352(9):857-915745974
Cites: Health Policy. 2005 Jul;73(1):10-2015911053
Cites: Int J Technol Assess Health Care. 2005 Spring;21(2):219-2715921062
Cites: BMJ. 2006 Jan 14;332(7533):112-416410591
Cites: Health Policy. 2007 Mar;80(3):444-5816757057
Cites: Am J Surg. 2002 Apr;183(4):399-40511975927
Cites: J Am Coll Surg. 2003 Jul;197(1):64-7012831926
Cites: World J Surg. 2003 Aug;27(8):962-612784149
Cites: World J Surg. 2003 Aug;27(8):930-4; discussion 934-512822049
Cites: J Health Serv Res Policy. 2003 Oct;8(4):197-20114596753
Cites: Ann Surg. 2003 Dec;238(6 Suppl):S56-6614703746
Cites: J Neurosurg. 2004 Jan;100(1):2-714743905
Cites: J Infect Dis. 2004 Mar 1;189(5):930-714976611
Cites: J Neurosurg. 1979 Jul;51(1):5-11376786
Cites: Int J Technol Assess Health Care. 1985;1(3):669-8010276734
Cites: J Vasc Surg. 1996 Feb;23(2):191-2008637096
Cites: World J Surg. 1996 Jul-Aug;20(6):687-918662153
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 1996 May;11(5):294-3028725978
Cites: Adv Surg. 1996;29:93-1098719997
Cites: J Endovasc Surg. 1997 Feb;4(1):72-7; discussion 78-99034923
Cites: J Clin Oncol. 1997 Apr;15(4):1289-909193318
Cites: ACP J Club. 1997 Nov-Dec;127(3):A16-89410455
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 1998 Apr 9;81(7A):33E-43E9551593
Cites: Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2005 Feb;21(1):51-515681218
Cites: Philos Public Aff. 1997 Fall;26(4):303-5011660435
PubMed ID
18005409 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adoption of an Internet-based patient education programme in psychiatric hospitals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129777
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2011 Dec;18(10):914-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
M. Anttila
M. Välimäki
M. Koivunen
T. Luukkaala
M. Kaila
A. Pitkänen
R. Kontio
Author Affiliation
Finnish Post-Graduate School in Nursing Science, University of Turku, Finland. minna.anttila@utu.fi
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2011 Dec;18(10):914-23
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Computers
Computer-Assisted Instruction - methods
Diffusion of Innovation
Female
Finland
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Internet
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Program Evaluation - methods
Psychiatric Nursing - methods
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Internet-based patient support systems are widely assumed to predict a future trend in patient education. Coherent information is still lacking on how patient education is adopted in psychiatric hospitals and how information technology is used in it. Our aim was to describe nurses' adoption of an Internet-based patient education programme and the variables explaining it. The study was based on Rogers' model of the diffusion of innovation. The Internet-based patient education sessions were carried out by nurses on nine acute psychiatric inpatient wards in two Finnish hospitals. They were evaluated with reports and analysed statistically. Out of 100 nurses, 83 adopted the programme during the study period. The nurses fell into Rogers' groups, late majority (72%), laggards (17%), early majority (7%), early adopters (3%) and innovators (1%). Three groups were formed according to their activity: laggards, late majority, adopters (including early majority, early adopters, innovators). There was a statistical difference between the nurses' programme adoption between the two hospitals (P= 0.045): more laggards (65% vs. 35%) and adopters (73% vs. 27%) in the same hospital. The findings help to provide insight into the contexts and settings when adopting information technology programmes in the area of mental health care.
PubMed ID
22070578 View in PubMed
Less detail

537 records – page 1 of 54.