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Association of iodine fortification with incident use of antithyroid medication--a Danish Nationwide Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89326
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2009 Jul;94(7):2400-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
Cerqueira Charlotte
Knudsen Nils
Ovesen Lars
Perrild Hans
Rasmussen Lone B
Laurberg Peter
Jørgensen Torben
Author Affiliation
Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Glostrup University Hospital, DK-2600 Glostrup, Denmark. Chacer01@glo.regionh.dk
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2009 Jul;94(7):2400-5
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antithyroid Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dietary Supplements - utilization
Female
Humans
Hyperthyroidism - drug therapy - epidemiology
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Iodine - administration & dosage - supply & distribution
Male
Middle Aged
Sodium Chloride, Dietary - supply & distribution
Young Adult
Abstract
CONTEXT: Iodine-induced hyperthyroidism has been reported in the early phases of almost all iodine fortification programs, depending on prior iodine intake in the population, the amount of fortification, and the rate of change. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to monitor the effect of the Danish iodine fortification program on incidence of hyperthyroidism as measured by the incident use of antithyroid medication. DESIGN: We conducted a register study. Using the unique identification number of all Danes, we linked data from the Register of Medicinal Product Statistics and the Civil Registration register on an individual level. All dispensing of antithyroid medication from 1995 to 2007 was studied. The place of residency was used to divide patients into mildly and moderately iodine-deficient groups. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: We measured the incident use of antithyroid medication. RESULTS: In the region with moderate iodine deficiency, the number of incident users of antithyroid medication increased 46% in the first 4 yr of iodine fortification. The use increased the most among the youngest age group (younger than 40 yr) and the oldest age group (older than 75 yr). In the mildly iodine-deficient region, the number of incident users increased only 18%, and only in the youngest age groups (below 40 and 40-59 yr). After 4 yr of fortification, the incidence rates started to fall and reached baseline, for most groups, 6 yr after onset of fortification. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that iodine fortification induced a temporary, modest increase in the incidence of hyperthyroidism as measured by use of antithyroid medication. A new steady state has not yet evolved.
PubMed ID
19366844 View in PubMed
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Complementary and alternative medicine use among general surgery, hepatobiliary surgery and surgical oncology patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147668
Source
Can J Surg. 2009 Oct;52(5):422-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Colin Schieman
Luke R Rudmik
Elijah Dixon
Francis Sutherland
Oliver F Bathe
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alta.
Source
Can J Surg. 2009 Oct;52(5):422-6
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alberta
Attitude to Health
Biliary Tract Neoplasms - mortality - surgery - therapy
Complementary Therapies - utilization
Dietary Supplements - utilization
Female
General Surgery
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Incidence
Liver Neoplasms - mortality - surgery - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - diagnosis - mortality - surgery - therapy
Oncology Service, Hospital
Patient Participation
Prognosis
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Survival Analysis
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is becoming more common, particularly among cancer patients. We sought to define the frequency of CAM use among general surgery, hepatobiliary and surgical oncology patients and to define some of the determinants of CAM use in patients with benign and malignant disease.
We asked all patients attending the clinics of 3 hepatobiliary/surgical oncology surgeons from 2002 to 2005 to voluntarily respond on first and subsequent visits to a questionnaire related to the use of CAM. We randomly selected patients for review.
We reviewed a total of 490 surveys from 357 patients. Overall CAM use was 27%. There was significantly more CAM use among cancer (34%) versus noncancer patients (21%; p = 0.008), and the use of CAM was more common in patients with unresectable cancer (51%) than resectable cancer (22%; p
Notes
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PubMed ID
19865579 View in PubMed
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Complementary and alternative medicine use in adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease and juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263251
Source
BMC Complement Altern Med. 2014;14:124
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Pauliina Nousiainen
Laura Merras-Salmio
Kristiina Aalto
Kaija-Leena Kolho
Source
BMC Complement Altern Med. 2014;14:124
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Arthritis, Juvenile - therapy
Child
Complementary Therapies - utilization
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Dietary Supplements - utilization
Female
Finland
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - therapy
Male
Micronutrients - therapeutic use
Probiotics - therapeutic use
Questionnaires
Self Care
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
The use of complementary alternative medicine (CAM) is potentially prevalent among paediatric patients with chronic diseases but with variable rates among different age groups, diseases and countries. There are no recent reports on CAM use among paediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in Europe. We hypothesized that CAM use associates with a more severe disease in paediatric IBD and JIA.
A cross-sectional questionnaire study among adolescent outpatients with IBD and JIA addressing the frequency and type of CAM use during the past year. The patients were recruited at the Children's Hospital, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Of the 147 respondents, 97 had IBD (Crohn's disease: n?=?46; median age 15.5, disease duration 3.4 years) and 50 had JIA (median age 13.8, disease duration 6.9 years). During the past 12 months, 48% regularly used CAM while 81% reported occasional CAM use. Compared to patients with JIA, the use of CAM in IBD patients tended to be more frequent. The most commonly used CAM included probiotics, multivitamins, and mineral and trace element supplements. Self-imposed dietary restrictions were common, involving 27.6% of the non-CAM users but 64.8% of all CAM users. Disease activity was associated with CAM use in JIA but not in IBD.
CAM use is frequent among adolescents with IBD and JIA and associates with self-imposed dietary restrictions. Reassuringly, adherence to disease modifying drugs is good in young CAM users. In JIA, patients with active disease used more frequently CAM than patients with inactive disease. As CAM use is frequent, physicians should familiarise themselves with the basic concepts of CAM. The potential pharmacological interaction or the toxicity of certain CAM products warrants awareness and hence physicians should actively ask their patients about CAM use.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24708564 View in PubMed
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Compliance with fluoride supplements provided by a dental hygienist in homes of low-income parents of preschool children in Quebec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164130
Source
J Public Health Dent. 2007;67(1):60-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Fabien Gagnon
Pierre Catellier
Isabelle Arteau-Gauthier
Elisabeth Simard-Tremblay
Marianne Lepage-Saucier
Nina Paradis-Robert
Julie Michel
André Lavallière
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Department of Community Health Sciences, 3001, 12e Avenue Nord, Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada. Fabien.Gagnon@USherbrooke.ca
Source
J Public Health Dent. 2007;67(1):60-3
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cariostatic Agents - administration & dosage
Chi-Square Distribution
Child, Preschool
Dental Hygienists
Dietary Supplements - utilization
Female
Health Education, Dental
House Calls
Humans
Infant
Longitudinal Studies
Maternal-Child Health Centers
Mothers
Patient compliance
Poverty
Quebec
Sodium Fluoride - administration & dosage
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
This study aimed to assess the compliance with fluoride supplements provided at home by a dental hygienist to mothers of at-risk preschool children.
Participants were recruited during pregnancy of low-income women. On the first visit, the mothers of 60 infants aged 6 to 9 months were handed free fluoride supplements. A questionnaire was administered at that time and after 6 and 12 months to assess compliance during the preceding week.
At the beginning of the study, none of the mothers reported having given fluoride supplements, in comparison with 73 percent of mothers of 44 infants who received all three visits at the end of follow-up; 48 percent reported fluoride supplement use on a daily basis.
Removal of financial and physical barriers and personal professional involvement are good strategies to achieve compliance with fluoride supplements. Further assessment regarding the possible application of this intervention to other professional or cultural contexts is warranted.
PubMed ID
17436981 View in PubMed
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Development of an international questionnaire to measure use of complementary and alternative medicine (I-CAM-Q).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89251
Source
J Altern Complement Med. 2009 Apr;15(4):331-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Quandt Sara A
Verhoef Marja J
Arcury Thomas A
Lewith George T
Steinsbekk Aslak
Kristoffersen Agnete E
Wahner-Roedler Dietlind L
Fønnebø Vinjar
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, Division of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University School of Medicine , Winston-Salem, NC 27157-1063, USA. squandt@wfubmc.edu
Source
J Altern Complement Med. 2009 Apr;15(4):331-9
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Complementary Therapies - utilization
Dietary Supplements - utilization
Health Care Surveys
Health Personnel
Herbal Medicine - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Internationality
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Patient satisfaction
Questionnaires
Research Design
Self Care - utilization
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Existing studies on the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) have produced diverse results regarding the types and prevalence of CAM use due, in part, to variations in the measurement of CAM modalities. A questionnaire that can be adapted for use in a variety of populations will improve CAM utilization measurement. The purposes of this article are to (1) articulate the need for such a common questionnaire; (2) describe the process of questionnaire development; (3) present a model questionnaire with core questions; and (4) suggest standard techniques for adapting the questionnaire to different languages and populations. METHODS: An international workshop sponsored by the National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NAFKAM) of the University of Tromsø, Norway, brought CAM researchers and practitioners together to design an international CAM questionnaire (I-CAM-Q). Existing questionnaires were critiqued, and working groups drafted content for a new questionnaire. A smaller working group completed, tested, and revised this self-administered questionnaire. RESULTS: The questionnaire that was developed contains four sections concerned with visits to health care providers, complementary treatments received from physicians, use of herbal medicine and dietary supplements, and self-help practices. A priori-specified practitioners, therapies, supplements, and practices are included, as well as places for researcher-specified and respondent-specified additions. Core questions are designed to elicit frequency of use, purpose (treatment of acute or chronic conditions, and health maintenance), and satisfaction. A penultimate version underwent pretesting with "think-aloud" techniques to identify problems related to meaning and format. The final questionnaire is presented, with suggestions for testing and translating. CONCLUSIONS: Once validated in English and non-English speaking populations, the I-CAM-Q will provide an opportunity for researchers to gather comparable data in studies conducted in different populations. Such data will increase knowledge about the epidemiology of CAM use and provide the foundation for evidence-based comparisons at an international level.
PubMed ID
19388855 View in PubMed
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Diet among breast cancer survivors and healthy women. The Norwegian Women and Cancer Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82767
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2006 Sep;60(9):1046-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Skeie G.
Hjartåker A.
Lund E.
Author Affiliation
Institute for Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway. guri.skeie@ism.uit.no
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2006 Sep;60(9):1046-54
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Breast Neoplasms - psychology
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet Surveys
Dietary Supplements - utilization
Female
Food Habits - psychology
Fruit
Health status
Humans
Life Style
Middle Aged
Norway
Time Factors
Vegetables
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To compare the diet and lifestyle in breast cancer survivors and healthy women. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study in the population-based Norwegian Women and Cancer cohort study, using a postal questionnaire on diet, lifestyle and health. SETTING: Nation-wide, population-based study. SUBJECTS: Women aged 41-70 years. Prevalent breast cancer cases (314 short-term with 1-5 years since diagnosis, 352 long-term with >5 years since diagnosis) were identified by linkage to the Norwegian Cancer Registry. The comparison group consisted of 54,314 women. INTERVENTIONS: Analyses of variance, with post hoc Bonferroni tests when significant differences were found. RESULTS: Overall there were few differences in the diet of the three groups. Short-term survivors ate more fruits and vegetables than healthy women (P
PubMed ID
16482067 View in PubMed
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Dietary supplementation of high-performance Canadian athletes by age and gender.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160389
Source
Clin J Sport Med. 2007 Nov;17(6):458-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Kelly Anne Erdman
Tak S Fung
Patricia K Doyle-Baker
Marja J Verhoef
Raylene A Reimer
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Kinesiology, Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada.
Source
Clin J Sport Med. 2007 Nov;17(6):458-64
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alberta
Attitude to Health
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dietary Supplements - utilization
Doping in Sports - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Sports
Abstract
To determine dietary supplementation practices and opinions, preferred means for dietary supplement (DS) education, and antidoping opinions among elite Canadian athletes varying in age and gender.
A descriptive, cross-sectional survey.
Elite athlete training centers in Calgary, Canada and surrounding area.
A total of 582 high-performance athletes (314 male, 268 female).
High-performance athletes representing 27 sports with a mean age of 19.96+/-3.91 years completed a validated questionnaire assessing DS practices and opinions by recall. Sport categories included varsity, Canadian Sport Centre Calgary (CSCC), and National Sport School (NSS).
There was extensive DS use, with 88.4% of participants taking>or=1 DS (mean of 3.08+/-1.87 DS per user) during the previous 6 months. Overall, sport drinks (22.4%), sport bars (14.0%), multivitamins and minerals (13.5%), protein supplements (9.0%), and vitamin C (6.4%) were most frequently reported. Older athletes were significantly more likely to report greater DS usage; to be advised by teammates, health food store retailers, and magazines; to prefer supplementation education via individual interviews; to claim awareness of anti-doping rules; and to perceive anti-doping compliance. Relative to gender, significant differences were observed for the types of DS reported; supplementation advisors; justifications for DS use; and awareness of anti-doping regulations.
Utilization of this validated and reliable questionnaire has the potential for broad use and provides insight into the factors that influence DS use in elite athletes.
PubMed ID
17993788 View in PubMed
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[Dietary supplement use among adolescents in Germany. Results of EsKiMo]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91373
Source
Bundesgesundheitsblatt Gesundheitsforschung Gesundheitsschutz. 2008 Oct;51(10):1202-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Six J.
Richter A.
Rabenberg M.
Hintzpeter B.
Vohmann C.
Stahl A.
Heseker H.
Mensink G B M
Author Affiliation
Robert Koch-Institut, Berlin, BRD.
Source
Bundesgesundheitsblatt Gesundheitsforschung Gesundheitsschutz. 2008 Oct;51(10):1202-9
Date
Oct-2008
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Dietary Supplements - utilization
Female
Food Habits
Germany - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Nutrition Surveys
Abstract
In 2006, 20 % of adolescents aged 12-17 years used dietary supplements. Persons with high physical activity levels as well as those with high education levels consumed dietary supplements more often than others. Many supplement users used only one single-nutrient supplement. A similarly large proportion of users consumed one supplement with multiple nutrients. Most often supplements containing vitamin C, magnesium, B-vitamins, vitamin E and calcium were used.
PubMed ID
18985414 View in PubMed
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Dietary supplement use and iron, zinc and folate intake in pregnant women in London, Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126202
Source
Chronic Dis Inj Can. 2012 Mar;32(2):76-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
A. Roy
S E Evers
M K Campbell
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Chronic Dis Inj Can. 2012 Mar;32(2):76-83
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Chi-Square Distribution
Diet Surveys
Dietary Supplements - utilization
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage
Humans
Iron, Dietary - administration & dosage
Nutrition Policy
Ontario
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Zinc - administration & dosage
Abstract
We examined the dietary intake of iron, zinc and folate, estimated from both food and supplement sources, in 2019 pregnant women who participated in the Prenatal Health Project (PHP). The PHP recruited pregnant women from ultrasound clinics in London, Ontario, in the years 2002-2005.
Participants completed a telephone survey, which included a food frequency questionnaire and questions on dietary supplement use. Frequencies of use of dietary supplements were generated. Nutrient intake values were estimated from food and supplement sources, and summed to calculate total daily intake values.
Most women took a multivitamin supplement, and many women took folic acid and iron supplements; however, one-fifth of the sample did not take any supplements providing any of the three micronutrients. Despite being of a higher socio-economic status overall, significant proportions of the cohort ranked below the recommended dietary allowance values for iron, zinc, and folate. This suggests there may be other barriers that impact dietary practices.
Further research is required on how to better promote supplement use and a healthy diet during pregnancy.
PubMed ID
22414304 View in PubMed
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Dietary supplement use and mortality in a cohort of Swedish men--comments by Boucher.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157861
Source
Br J Nutr. 2008 Dec;100(6):1345; discussion 1346
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Barbara J Boucher
Author Affiliation
Centre for Diabetes and Metabolic Medicine, Bart's and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Institute of Cell and Molecular Science, 4 Newark Street, London E1 2AT, UK. bboucher@doctors.org.uk
Source
Br J Nutr. 2008 Dec;100(6):1345; discussion 1346
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Dietary Supplements - utilization
Humans
Male
Mortality
Sweden - epidemiology
Vitamin D - therapeutic use
Notes
Comment On: Br J Nutr. 2008 Mar;99(3):626-3117764599
PubMed ID
18394219 View in PubMed
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44 records – page 1 of 5.