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25-Hydroxyvitamin D in Canadian adults: biological, environmental, and behavioral correlates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141385
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2011 May;22(5):1389-99
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
L S Greene-Finestone
C. Berger
M. de Groh
D A Hanley
N. Hidiroglou
K. Sarafin
S. Poliquin
J. Krieger
J B Richards
D. Goltzman
Author Affiliation
Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. linda.greene-finestone@phac-aspc.gc.ca
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2011 May;22(5):1389-99
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Body mass index
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Dietary Supplements
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications - epidemiology
Seasons
Sex Distribution
Skin Pigmentation - physiology
Sunlight
Vitamin D - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
We assessed vitamin D status and its correlates in the population-based Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos). Results showed that serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels
PubMed ID
20730415 View in PubMed
Less detail

25(OH)D levels in trained versus sedentary university students at 64° north.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290407
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1314414
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
2017
Author
Scott P Jerome
Kendra D Sticka
Theresia M Schnurr
Sally J Mangum
Arleigh J Reynolds
Kriya L Dunlap
Author Affiliation
a Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry , University of Alaska Fairbanks , Fairbanks , AK , USA.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1314414
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Arctic Regions
Athletes - statistics & numerical data
Body Weights and Measures
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Dietary Supplements
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Humans
Male
Metabolic Equivalent
Sedentary lifestyle
Students
Sunlight
Universities
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) deficiency is associated with compromised bone mineralisation, fatigue, suppressed immune function and unsatisfactory skeletal muscle recovery. We investigated the risk of 25(OH)D insufficiency or deficiency in endurance athletes compared to sedentary non-athletes living at 64° north.
University student-athletes (TS) and sedentary students (SS) volunteered to participate in this study. TS engaged in regular exercise while SS exercised no more than 20 minutes/week. Metabolic Equivalent of Task (MET) scores for participants were determined. Vitamin D intake was assessed using the National Cancer Institute's 24-hour food recall (ASA24). Fasting plasma 25(OH)D levels were quantified via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.
TS reported higher activity levels than SS as assessed with MET-minutes/week and ranking of physical activity levels (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
28452288 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2004 Canadian recommendations for the management of hypertension: Part III--Lifestyle modifications to prevent and control hypertension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181497
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2004 Jan;20(1):55-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
R M Touyz
N. Campbell
A. Logan
N. Gledhill
R. Petrella
R. Padwal
Author Affiliation
Clinical Research Institute of Montreal, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. touyzr@icrm.qc.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2004 Jan;20(1):55-9
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antioxidants - administration & dosage
Blood Pressure Determination - standards
Canada
Diet
Dietary Supplements
Evidence-Based Medicine - standards
Female
Humans
Hypertension - prevention & control - therapy
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Primary prevention - methods
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Societies, Medical
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations regarding the role of lifestyle modification in the treatment and prevention of hypertension.
Lifestyle modification interventions including exercise, weight reduction, alcohol consumption, dietary modification, intake of dietary cations and stress management are reviewed. Antioxidants and fish oil supplements are also reviewed, although specific recommendations cannot be made at present.
MEDLINE searches were conducted from January 2002 to September 2003 to update the 2001 recommendations for the management of hypertension. Supplemental searches in the Cochrane Collaboration databases were also performed. Reference lists were scanned, experts were contacted, and the personal files of the subgroup members and authors were used to identify additional published studies. All relevant articles were reviewed and appraised independently using prespecified levels of evidence by content and methodology experts.
Key recommendations include the following: lifestyle modification should be extended to nonhypertensive individuals who are at risk for developing high blood pressure; 30 min to 45 min of aerobic exercise should be performed on most days (four to five days) of the week; an ideal body weight (body mass index 18.5 kg/m2 to 24.9 kg/m2) should be maintained and weight loss strategies should use a multidisciplinary approach; alcohol consumption should be limited to two drinks or fewer per day, and weekly intake should not exceed 14 standard drinks for men and nine standard drinks for women; a reduced fat, low cholesterol diet that emphasizes fruits, vegetables and low fat dairy products, and maintains an adequate intake of potassium, magnesium and calcium, should be followed; salt intake should be restricted to 65 mmol/day to 100 mmol/day in hypertensive individuals and less than 100 mmol/day in normotensive individuals at high risk for developing hypertension; and stress management should be considered as an intervention in selected individuals.
All recommendations were graded according to the strength of the evidence and voted on by the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. Individuals with irreconcilable competing interests (declared by all members, compiled and circulated before the meeting) relative to any specific recommendation were excluded from voting on that recommendation. Only those recommendations achieving at least 70% consensus are reported here. These guidelines will continue to be updated annually.
PubMed ID
14968143 View in PubMed
Less detail

2010 clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of osteoporosis in Canada: summary.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140116
Source
CMAJ. 2010 Nov 23;182(17):1864-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-23-2010
Author
Alexandra Papaioannou
Suzanne Morin
Angela M Cheung
Stephanie Atkinson
Jacques P Brown
Sidney Feldman
David A Hanley
Anthony Hodsman
Sophie A Jamal
Stephanie M Kaiser
Brent Kvern
Kerry Siminoski
William D Leslie
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Geriatrics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont. papaioannou@hhsc.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2010 Nov 23;182(17):1864-73
Date
Nov-23-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control
Age Factors
Bone Density
Bone Density Conservation Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Calcium - therapeutic use
Canada
Dietary Supplements
Exercise Therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis - diagnosis - therapy
Osteoporotic Fractures - prevention & control
Risk factors
Vitamin D - therapeutic use
Notes
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PubMed ID
20940232 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acceptability of extrusion cooked cereal/legume weaning food supplements to Ghanaian mothers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195584
Source
Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2001 Jan;52(1):83-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2001
Author
Y. Mensa-Wilmot
R D Phillips
S. Sefa-Dedeh
Author Affiliation
Center for Food Safety and Quality Enhancement-Department of Food Science and Technology, University of Georgia, Agricultural Experiment Station, Griffin, GA 30223-1797, USA.
Source
Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2001 Jan;52(1):83-90
Date
Jan-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Cereals
Chi-Square Distribution
Consumer Satisfaction
Dietary Supplements
Fabaceae
Female
Focus Groups
Food Handling
Humans
Infant
Middle Aged
Mothers
Plants, Medicinal
Software
Weaning
Abstract
Six cereal/legume mixtures were developed with the aid of computer-assisted optimization software from cereal and legume staples indigenous to the West African sub-region. The mixtures had 45-50% maize, 35-40% decorticated cowpeas and either blanched peanuts or decorticated soybeans as a source of lipid and complementary amino acids. Three processing schemes involving roasting, amylase digestion and extrusion cooking were employed. The proportion of ingredients in each cereal/legume blend was based on meeting the nutrient requirement of the 0.5-0.9-year-old infant and cost considerations. Nutrient composition of the blends (proximate, amino acid, mineral and vitamin composition) indicated that these formulations were adequate nutritionally as weaning supplements (Mensa-Wilmot et al, 2000a,2000b). These formulations were evaluated by mothers of weanling children based on their preferences with respect to color, flavor, texture and willingness to purchase the product assessed. A total of 133 one-on-one interviews and 23 group discussions were conducted (involving 6-12 respondents) with selected Ghanaian women. The mothers found the convenience of a weaning food made from local staples that could be processed on village/market scale very attractive.
PubMed ID
11225182 View in PubMed
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The acceptability of isoflavones as a treatment of menopausal symptoms: a European survey among postmenopausal women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70456
Source
Climacteric. 2005 Sep;8(3):230-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
C. Koebnick
M. Reimann
A. Carlsohn
S. Korzen-Bohr
S. Bügel
J. Hallund
L. Rossi
F. Branca
W. Hall
C. Williams
H-J F Zunft
K. O'Doherty Jensen
Author Affiliation
German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Department of Intervention Studies, Nuthethal, Germany.
Source
Climacteric. 2005 Sep;8(3):230-42
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Attitude to Health
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dietary Supplements
Europe
Female
Food Habits
Health Behavior
Humans
Isoflavones - therapeutic use
Life Style
Menopause
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Phytotherapy
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Vitamins - therapeutic use
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate determinants of the acceptability of isoflavone products among postmenopausal women with regard to social and lifestyle factors, dietary habits, health concerns, food beliefs, menopausal symptoms and therapies, and to elucidate preferences for specific products. METHODS: A consumer survey was conducted among postmenopausal women in four European countries (Germany, Denmark, Italy and the UK), including a total of 465 respondents. RESULTS: The declared acceptability of isoflavones was highest in Germany (80%), followed by Italy (75%), the UK (59%) and Denmark (55%; p
PubMed ID
16390755 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Activity of glutathione-dependent antioxidant system of the rat liver and blood depending on gamma-irradiation and diet]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89398
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2008 Nov-Dec;80(6):66-73
Publication Type
Article
Author
Nikitchenko Iu V
Padalko V I
Tkachenko V M
Sheremet H O
Tovstiak V V
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2008 Nov-Dec;80(6):66-73
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antioxidants - metabolism
Diet
Dietary Supplements
Gamma Rays
Glutathione Peroxidase - blood - metabolism
Glutathione Transferase - blood - metabolism
Liver - enzymology - metabolism - radiation effects
Male
Microsomes, Liver - enzymology - metabolism - radiation effects
Mitochondria, Liver - enzymology - metabolism - radiation effects
Photinia - chemistry
Plant Extracts - administration & dosage - isolation & purification - therapeutic use
Radiation Injuries, Experimental - blood - metabolism - prevention & control
Rats
Rats, Wistar
Abstract
The role of the glutathione-dependent antioxidant system in the prooxidant-antioxidant balance support was studied in the experiments with Wistar male rat under single gamma-irradiation (8 Gr dose), fed with unbalanced (as to animal proteins and antioxidant vitamins) diet and with addition of Aronia melanocarpa. Single gamma-irradiation of animals led to the decrease of selenium-dependent glutathione-peroxidase activity in the blood plasma and glutathione-S-transferase activity decrease in rat liver mitochondria. Animals which received the unbalanced food allowance under irradiation showed more expressed change of glutathione-dependent antioxidant enzymes activity, namely--proved decrease of glutathione-peroxidase and glutathione-S-transferase activity in liver microsomes and less expressed activation of selenium-dependent glutathione-peroxidase activity in the postmitochondrial fraction of laboratory animals liver. Introduction of the A. melanocarpa food supplement in the unbalanced diet of the laboratory animals which in vitro demonstrated expressed antioxidant and antiradical activity had no effect upon glutathione-peroxidase activity in the investigated tissues. Obtained data concerning significant decrease of the activity of glutathione-dependent antioxidant system and, particularly, of the selenium-dependent glutathione-peroxidase activity under the unbalanced diet condition may be useful in maintenance of prooxidant-antioxidant balance in the tissues of irradiated animals. Allowing for the above stated it is advisable to seek for new food additives which increase activity of the endogenous glutathione-dependent antioxidant enzymes for human tolerance improvement, especially under the unbalanced food allowance condition.
PubMed ID
19351059 View in PubMed
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Acute antioxidant supplementation and skeletal muscle vascular conductance in aged rats: role of exercise and fiber type.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101895
Source
Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2011 Apr;300(4):H1536-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Daniel M Hirai
Steven W Copp
Peter J Schwagerl
Mark D Haub
David C Poole
Timothy I Musch
Author Affiliation
Department of Anatomy and Physiology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, 66506-5802, USA.
Source
Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2011 Apr;300(4):H1536-44
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antioxidants - pharmacology
Blood Pressure - drug effects - physiology
Cyclic N-Oxides - pharmacology
Dietary Supplements
Hindlimb - drug effects - physiology
Male
Muscle Fibers, Skeletal - drug effects - physiology
Muscle, Skeletal - blood supply - drug effects - physiology
Physical Conditioning, Animal - physiology
Rats
Rats, Inbred F344
Regional Blood Flow - drug effects - physiology
Rest - physiology
Spin Labels
Vascular Resistance - drug effects - physiology
Vasodilation - drug effects - physiology
Abstract
Age-related increases in oxidative stress contribute to impaired skeletal muscle vascular control. However, recent evidence indicates that antioxidant treatment with tempol (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl) attenuates flow-mediated vasodilation in isolated arterioles from the highly oxidative soleus muscle of aged rats. Whether antioxidant treatment with tempol evokes similar responses in vivo at rest and during exercise in senescent individuals and whether this effect varies based on muscle fiber type composition are unknown. We tested the hypothesis that redox modulation via acute systemic tempol administration decreases vascular conductance (VC) primarily in oxidative hindlimb locomotor muscles at rest and during submaximal whole body exercise (treadmill running at 20 m/min, 5% grade) in aged rats. Eighteen old (25-26 mo) male Fischer 344 x Brown Norway rats were assigned to either rest (n = 8) or exercise (n = 10) groups. Regional VC was determined via radiolabeled microspheres before and after intra-arterial administration of tempol (302 µmol/kg). Tempol decreased mean arterial pressure significantly by 9% at rest and 16% during exercise. At rest, similar VC in 26 out of 28 individual hindlimb muscles or muscle parts following tempol administration compared with control resulted in unchanged total hindlimb muscle VC (control: 0.18 ± 0.02; tempol: 0.17 ± 0.05 ml·min(-1)·100 g(-1)·mmHg(-1); P > 0.05). During exercise, all individual hindlimb muscles or muscle parts irrespective of fiber type composition exhibited either an increase or no change in VC with tempol (i.e., ?11 and ?17 muscles or muscle parts), such that total hindlimb VC increased by 25% (control: 0.93 ± 0.04; tempol: 1.15 ± 0.09 ml·min(-1)·100 g(-1)·mmHg(-1); P = 0.05). These results demonstrate that acute systemic administration of the antioxidant tempol significantly impacts the control of regional vascular tone in vivo presumably via redox modulation and improves skeletal muscle vasodilation independently of fiber type composition during submaximal whole body exercise in aged rats.
PubMed ID
21239634 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute selenium poisoning from selenium-containing iron supplement in suckling pigs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75515
Source
Vet Hum Toxicol. 2003 Feb;45(1):31-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Tore Sivertsen
Anne Jørgensen
Aksel Bernhoft
Gunnar A Sylliaas
Hilde Magda Juul
Børge Baustad
Author Affiliation
The Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, PO Box 8146 Dep, 0033 Oslo, Norway.
Source
Vet Hum Toxicol. 2003 Feb;45(1):31-2
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Newborn
Dietary Supplements
Disease Outbreaks - veterinary
Iron - administration & dosage
Norway - epidemiology
Poisoning - epidemiology - etiology - veterinary
Selenium - blood - poisoning
Swine
Swine Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
We report an outbreak of acute selenium poisoning among suckling pigs; 92 piglets were found dead or moribund without preceding symptoms. Necropsy revealed acute congestion of liver and small intestine. The source was a powdered iron supplement contaminated by sodium selenite.
PubMed ID
12583694 View in PubMed
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Adequacy of nutritional intake in a Canadian population of patients with Crohn's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161617
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2007 Sep;107(9):1575-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Elaheh Aghdassi
Barbara E Wendland
Melanie Stapleton
Maitreyi Raman
Johane P Allard
Author Affiliation
The University Health Network, Toronto, Canada.
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2007 Sep;107(9):1575-80
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Canada
Crohn Disease - diet therapy - physiopathology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - standards
Diet Records
Dietary Supplements
Energy intake
Female
Humans
Male
Minerals - administration & dosage
Nutrition Policy
Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Nutritional Requirements
Nutritional Status
Severity of Illness Index
Vitamins - administration & dosage
Abstract
Crohn's disease is frequently associated with nutritional deficiencies, often a result of disease activity and poor oral intake. This study investigated the adequacy of dietary intake, based on the Canadian Dietary Reference Intake, in ambulatory patients with Crohn's disease and a normal body mass index (BMI; calculated as kg/m(2)). This was a cross-sectional study of 74 patients with mean age of 35.7+/-1.4 years and BMI of 23.05+/-0.45. All patients completed a 7-day food record and a diary for the Crohn's Disease Activity Index. Mean Crohn's Disease Activity Index was 138.99+/-11.38. Energy and protein intakes were within the recommended levels of intake, but total carbohydrates, fat, and saturated fat intake exceeded the recommended levels of
PubMed ID
17761234 View in PubMed
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