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Adverse effects on risk of ischaemic heart disease of adding sugar to hot beverages in hypertensives using diuretics. A six year follow-up in the Copenhagen Male Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11267
Source
Blood Press. 1996 Mar;5(2):91-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
P. Suadicani
H O Hein
F. Gyntelberg
Author Affiliation
Epidemiological Research Unit, Clinic of Occupational Medicine, Righospitalet, State University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Blood Press. 1996 Mar;5(2):91-7
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Coffee
Denmark - epidemiology
Dietary Sucrose - adverse effects
Diuretics - therapeutic use
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - epidemiology - etiology
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Tea
Abstract
Non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) and essential hypertension (EH) are two of several manifestations of the insulin resistance syndrome. Although subjects with NIDDM and subjects with EH share a common defect in carbohydrate metabolism, only diabetics are advised to avoid sugar. We tested the theory that an adverse effect of diuretics treatment in men with EH with respect to risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) would depend on the intake of dietary sugar using sugar in hot beverages as a marker. The cohort consisted of 2,899 men from the Copenhagen Male Study aged 53-74 years (mean 63) who were without overt cardiovascular disease. Potential confounders were: age, alcohol,smoking, physical activity, body mass index, blood pressure, fasting lipids, cotinine, NIDDM,and social class. A total of 340 men took antihypertensives; 211 took diuretics (95% thiazides and related agents), and 129 used other antihypertensives. During 6 years, 179 men (6.2%) had a first IHD event. Among the 340 men taking antihypertensives, the incidence rate was 11%. Diuretics use was associated with a high risk of IHD in hypertensive men with a relatively high intake of dietary sugar; the cumulative incidence rate was 22%; in diuretics treated men with a low intake of sugar, the rate was 7%. After controlling for potential confounders, relative risk (95% ci.) was 3.1(1.3-7.6), p = 001. Among the 129 men who took other forms of antihypertensive drugs, the IHD incidence rate was 8%, and independent of the intake of sugar. The results indicate that the risk of IHD in hypertensives using diuretics is associated with intake of dietary sugar, which may explain at least some of the discouraging effects of antihypertensive agents on the reduction of risk of IHD.
PubMed ID
8860097 View in PubMed
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Approximal caries and sugar consumption in Icelandic teenagers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61892
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1998 Apr;26(2):115-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1998
Author
I B Arnadóttir
R G Rozier
S R Saemundsson
H. Sigurjóns
W P Holbrook
Author Affiliation
University of Iceland Faculty of Odontology, Reykjavik.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1998 Apr;26(2):115-21
Date
Apr-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Analysis of Variance
Candy - adverse effects - utilization
Dental Caries - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Dietary Sucrose - adverse effects
Energy intake
Food Habits
Health Behavior
Humans
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Saliva - microbiology
Abstract
The aim of this study, conducted in 1994, was to examine the association between approximal caries and sugar consumption in teenagers residing in three fluoride-deficient areas in Iceland while controlling for a number of behavioral, residential and microbiological factors. One hundred and fifty subjects (mean age 14 years) selected from the Icelandic Nutritional Survey (INS) were examined radiographically and they completed questionnaires about sugar consumption frequency. Total grams of sugar intake were obtained from the INS for each subject. Caries experience on approximal surfaces, diagnosed from radiographs, was used as the dependent variable in the analyses. Altogether 45.2% of subjects were caries free on approximal surfaces. The overall sample was found to have a mean DFS on approximal surfaces of 2.73 (s=4.36) per subject. Average daily total sugar intake was 170 g per subject and the mean number of sugar-eating occasions between meals was 5.32 (s=6.29) per subject. The regression model indicated that the frequency of between-meal sugar consumption was associated with approximal caries, with frequency of candy consumption being the most important of the sugar variables. In multivariate analysis, no relationship was found between dental caries and total daily intake of sugar, although a significant relationship between total sugar consumption and presence of caries was seen in bivariate analysis. Between-meal consumption of sugar remains a risk factor for the occurrence of dental caries, especially in populations with moderate-to-high levels of dental caries experience.
PubMed ID
9645405 View in PubMed
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Association between added sugar intake and dental caries in Yup'ik children using a novel hair biomarker.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299044
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2015 Oct 09; 15(1):121
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
Oct-09-2015
Author
Donald L Chi
Scarlett Hopkins
Diane O'Brien
Lloyd Mancl
Eliza Orr
Dane Lenaker
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Health Sciences, University of Washington School of Dentistry, Box 357475, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA. dchi@uw.edu.
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2015 Oct 09; 15(1):121
Date
Oct-09-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Adolescent
Beverages
Biomarkers - analysis
Child
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dietary Sucrose - adverse effects
Female
Hair - chemistry
Humans
Male
Sugars
Sweetening Agents
Abstract
Dental caries (tooth decay) is a significant public health problem in Alaska Native children. Dietary added sugars are considered one of the main risk factors. In this cross-sectional pilot study, we used a validated hair-based biomarker to measure added sugar intake in Alaska Native Yup'ik children ages 6-17 years (N?=?51). We hypothesized that added sugar intake would be positively associated with tooth decay.
A 66-item parent survey was administered, a hair sample was collected from each child, and a dental exam was conducted. Added sugar intake (grams/day) was measured from hair samples using a linear combination of carbon and nitrogen ratios. We used linear and log-linear regression models with robust standard errors to test our hypothesis that children with higher added sugar intake would have a higher proportion of carious tooth surfaces.
The mean proportion of carious tooth surfaces was 30.8 % (standard deviation: 23.2 %). Hair biomarker-based added sugar intake was associated with absolute (6.4 %; 95 % CI: 1.2 %, 11.6 %; P?=?.02) and relative increases in the proportion of carious tooth surfaces (24.2 %; 95 % CI: 10.6 %, 39.4 %; P?
PubMed ID
26452647 View in PubMed
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Association between intake of artificially sweetened and sugar-sweetened beverages and preterm delivery: a large prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122026
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2012 Sep;96(3):552-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Linda Englund-Ögge
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Margareta Haugen
Verena Sengpiel
Ali Khatibi
Ronny Myhre
Solveig Myking
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Marian Kacerovsky
Roy M Nilsen
Bo Jacobsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. linda.englund-ogge@vgregion.se
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2012 Sep;96(3):552-9
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Beverages - adverse effects
Carbonated Beverages - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Dietary Sucrose - adverse effects
Educational Status
Energy intake
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Norway
Obstetric Labor, Premature - etiology
Overweight - complications
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Registries
Single Person
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweetening Agents - adverse effects
Thinness - complications
Abstract
Artificially sweetened (AS) and sugar-sweetened (SS) beverages are commonly consumed during pregnancy. A recent Danish study reported that the daily intake of an AS beverage was associated with an increased risk of preterm delivery.
We examined the intake of AS and SS beverages in pregnant women to replicate the Danish study and observe whether AS intake is indeed associated with preterm delivery.
This was a prospective study of 60,761 pregnant women in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. Intakes of carbonated and noncarbonated AS and SS beverages and use of artificial sweeteners in hot drinks were assessed by a self-reported food-frequency questionnaire in midpregnancy. Preterm delivery was the primary outcome, and data were obtained from the Norwegian Medical Birth Registry.
Intakes of both AS and SS beverages increased with increasing BMI and energy intake and were higher in women with less education, in daily smokers, and in single women. A high intake of AS beverages was associated with preterm delivery; the adjusted OR for those drinking >1 serving/d was 1.11 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.24). Drinking >1 serving of SS beverages per day was also associated with an increased risk of preterm delivery (adjusted OR: 1.25; 95% CI: 1.08, 1.45). The trend tests were positive for both beverage types.
This study suggests that a high intake of both AS and SS beverages is associated with an increased risk of preterm delivery.
Notes
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Comment In: Am J Clin Nutr. 2013 Jan;97(1):22423283681
Comment In: Am J Clin Nutr. 2013 Jan;97(1):224-523405391
PubMed ID
22854404 View in PubMed
Less detail

Caffeinated sugar-sweetened beverages and common physical complaints in Icelandic children aged 10-12 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105087
Source
Prev Med. 2014 Jan;58:40-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Alfgeir L Kristjansson
Inga Dora Sigfusdottir
Michael J Mann
Jack E James
Source
Prev Med. 2014 Jan;58:40-4
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Beverages - adverse effects - utilization
Child
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dietary Sucrose - adverse effects
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Energy Drinks - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Male
Somatoform Disorders - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Abstract
Consumption of caffeinated sugar-sweetened beverages (CSSBs) among children and adolescents has increased markedly in recent years but the consequence of their consumption is not well understood. The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of CSSBs in children aged 10–12 years and examine the relationship between CSSBs and common physical complaints.
Data from the 2013 cross-sectional population school survey Youth in Iceland (N=11,267, response rate: 90.1%, girls 49.7%)was used to assess the prevalence of cola and energy drink consumption and associations to headaches, stomachaches, sleeping problems and low appetite.
Around 19% of boys and 8% of girls reported consuming cola drinks on a daily basis and 7% of boys and 3% of girls reported consuming energy drinks. A general trend of a dose–response relationship was observed between CSSBs and physical complaints for both types of beverages. These relationships were generally stronger for energy drinks than cola drinks.
Our findings call into question the acceptability, availability, and marketing of CSSBs to 10–12 year-old children and adolescents. For validation purposes replications of these analyses are needed in other parts of the world, including studies using prospective longitudinal designs.
PubMed ID
24494227 View in PubMed
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Carious lesions and caries risk predictors in a group of Swedish children 2 to 3 years of age. One year observation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128604
Source
Eur J Paediatr Dent. 2011 Dec;12(4):215-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
M. Bankel
A. Robertson
B. Köhler
Author Affiliation
Public Dental Health Service Kungälv, Public Dental Health, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Paediatr Dent. 2011 Dec;12(4):215-9
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Feeding - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Child, Preschool
Colony Count, Microbial
Cross-Sectional Studies
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology - etiology
Dietary Sucrose - adverse effects
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Prevalence
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Saliva - microbiology
Streptococcus mutans - isolation & purification
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Identification of potential carious risk criteria, retrospectively at 2 years of age, for developing carious lesions at 3 years of age. Study design Longitudinal observations from 2 until 3 years of age. Cross-sectional observations of two cohorts of 3- year-olds with different approaches.
The study group consisted of 78 three- year- olds from a previous study at age 2 years. Clinical examination, diet history, questions regarding breastfeeding and salivary sampling for mutans streptococci (MS) were performed at both ages. The previous study on 124 three-year-olds was used as a control group for comparison of the 3-year-olds in the longitudinal study group.
The examinations suggested the following risk predictors: carious lesions, frequent intake of selected sugar-containing products, breastfeeding at night and MS, which covered all children with lesions at 3 years of age, resulting in a positive predictive value of 32% and a negative predictive value of 100%. The only statistically significant difference between the two groups of 3-year-olds was the reported intake of sugar-containing items. Statistics Student's t-test and chi square test, completed by Fischer's exact test.
The combination of the suggested risk criteria was predictive of carious lesions. In spite of individual parental information, new lesions developed after one year. Based on observations, a more structured and monitored preventive approach is suggested.
PubMed ID
22185243 View in PubMed
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The corporate determinants of health: how big business affects our health, and the need for government action!

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107172
Source
Can J Public Health. 2013 Jul-Aug;104(4):e327-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
John S Millar
Author Affiliation
UBC, PHABC. john.millar10@gmail.com.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2013 Jul-Aug;104(4):e327-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Beverages - adverse effects
Canada
Chronic Disease
Commerce - organization & administration
Dietary Fats - adverse effects
Dietary Sucrose - adverse effects
Efficiency
Food - adverse effects
Food Industry - legislation & jurisprudence
Government Regulation
Health Care Costs - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Humans
Social Responsibility
Sodium, Dietary - adverse effects
Abstract
Corporations have a great effect on the health of Canadians.Good companies create jobs, sell valued products at market value, pay a living wage, empower employees, have progressive human resource policies (parental, mental health leaves, workplace wellness programs, day care), and pay their appropriate corporate taxes. They embrace corporate social responsibility and some have a triple bottom line - people, planet and profits. More good corporations are needed.But others are selling products that are damaging to health and the environment, at prices that do not account for these damaging effects and often target consumers that are ill-informed and susceptible (e.g., children). These include businesses involving tobacco, alcohol, drugs, junk foods and beverages, resource extraction, arms production and the electronic media.Governments have a responsibility to take action when the market mechanism fails in this way.A priority for action is the food and beverage sector. The overconsumption of sugar, fat and salt is causing a rising prevalence of all the major chronic diseases, rising health care costs and declining population health and productivity. Urgent government action is required: taxation, advertising and sales restrictions, and a salt reduction program.
PubMed ID
24044474 View in PubMed
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Dietary determinants of hepatic steatosis and visceral adiposity in overweight and obese youth at risk of type 2 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104988
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2014 Apr;99(4):804-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Rebecca C Mollard
Martin Sénéchal
Andrea C MacIntosh
Jacqueline Hay
Brandy A Wicklow
Kristy D M Wittmeier
Elizabeth A C Sellers
Heather J Dean
Lawrence Ryner
Lori Berard
Jonathan M McGavock
Author Affiliation
Manitoba Institute of Child Health, Winnipeg, Canada (RCM, MS, ACM, JH, BAW, KDMW, EACS, HJD, and JMM); the Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada (RCM, MS, ACM, JH, BAW, KDMW, EACS, HJD, and JMM); the Department of Physiotherapy, Health Sciences Centre, Winnipeg, Canada (KDMW); CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada (LR); and the Diabetes Research Group Health Sciences Centre, Winnipeg, Canada (LB).
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2014 Apr;99(4):804-12
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Body mass index
Carbonated Beverages - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - etiology
Diet, High-Fat - adverse effects
Dietary Fiber - therapeutic use
Dietary Sucrose - adverse effects
Fatty Liver - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Intra-Abdominal Fat - pathology
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Obesity, Abdominal - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Overweight - diet therapy - etiology - pathology - physiopathology
Risk factors
Sedentary lifestyle
Abstract
Dietary determinants of hepatic steatosis, an important precursor for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, are undefined.
We explored the roles of sugar and fat intake as determinants of hepatic steatosis and visceral obesity in overweight adolescents at risk of type 2 diabetes.
This was a cross-sectional study of dietary patterns and adipose tissue distribution in 74 overweight adolescents (aged: 15.4 ± 1.8 y; body mass index z score: 2.2 ± 0.4). Main outcome measures were hepatic steatosis (=5.5% fat:water) measured by magnetic resonance spectroscopy and visceral obesity (visceral-to-subcutaneous adipose tissue ratio =0.25) measured by magnetic resonance imaging. Main exposure variables were dietary intake and habits assessed by the Harvard Youth Adolescent Food Frequency Questionnaire.
Hepatic steatosis and visceral obesity were evident in 43% and 44% of the sample, respectively. Fried food consumption was more common in adolescents with hepatic steatosis than in adolescents without hepatic steatosis (41% compared with 18%; P = 0.04). Total fat intake (ß = 0.51, P = 0.03) and the consumption of >35% of daily energy intake from fat (OR: 11.8; 95% CI: 1.6, 86.6; P = 0.02) were both positively associated with hepatic steatosis. Available carbohydrate (ß = 0.54, P = 0.02) and the frequent consumption of soda were positively associated with visceral obesity (OR: 6.4; 95% CI: 1.2, 34.0; P = 0.03). Daily fiber intake was associated with reduced odds of visceral obesity (OR: 0.82; 95% CI: 0.68, 0.98; P = 0.02) but not hepatic steatosis.
Hepatic steatosis is associated with a greater intake of fat and fried foods, whereas visceral obesity is associated with increased consumption of sugar and reduced consumption of fiber in overweight and obese adolescents at risk of type 2 diabetes.
PubMed ID
24522441 View in PubMed
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Environmental factors in inflammatory bowel disease: a case-control study based on a Danish inception cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129375
Source
J Crohns Colitis. 2011 Dec;5(6):577-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Tanja Stenbaek Hansen
Tine Jess
Ida Vind
Margarita Elkjaer
Malene Fey Nielsen
Michael Gamborg
Pia Munkholm
Author Affiliation
Gastrointestinal Unit, Medical Section, Herlev University Hospital, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Crohns Colitis. 2011 Dec;5(6):577-84
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Appendectomy - adverse effects
Breast Feeding - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Colitis, Ulcerative - epidemiology - etiology
Crohn Disease - epidemiology - etiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Dietary Fiber - adverse effects
Dietary Sucrose - adverse effects
Environment
Humans
Logistic Models
Measles - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Pertussis Vaccine - adverse effects
Poliovirus Vaccines - adverse effects
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Tonsillectomy - adverse effects
Abstract
The role of environmental factors in development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) remains uncertain. The aim of the present study was to assess a number of formerly suggested environmental factors in a case-control study of an unselected and recently diagnosed group of patients with IBD and a control group of orthopaedic patients.
A total of 123 patients diagnosed with Crohn's disease (CD) and 144 with ulcerative colitis (UC) in Copenhagen (2003-2004) were matched 1:1 on age and gender to 267 orthopaedic controls. Participants received a questionnaire with 87 questions concerning environmental factors prior to IBD/orthopaedic admission. Odds ratios (OR) were calculated by logistic regression.
Being breastfed >6 months (OR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.23-1.11) and undergoing tonsillectomy (OR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.31-0.78) decreased the odds for IBD, whereas appendectomy decreased the odds for UC only (OR, 0.29; 95% CI, 0.12-0.71). Vaccination against pertussis (OR, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.07-4.03) and polio (OR, 2.38; 95% CI, 1.04-5.43) increased the odds for IBD, whereas measles infection increased the odds for UC (OR, 3.50; 95% CI, 1.15-10.6). Low consumption of fibres and high consumption of sugar were significantly associated with development of CD and UC. Smoking increased the risk for CD and protected against UC.
Among Danish patients with CD and UC belonging to an unselected cohort, disease occurrence was found to be associated both with well-known factors such as smoking and appendectomy, and with more debated factors including breastfeeding, tonsillectomy, childhood vaccinations, childhood infections, and dietary intake of fibres and sugar.
PubMed ID
22115378 View in PubMed
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Genetic and life-style determinants of peptic ulcer. A study of 3387 men aged 54 to 74 years: The Copenhagen Male Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10729
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 1999 Jan;34(1):12-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1999
Author
P. Suadicani
H O Hein
F. Gyntelberg
Author Affiliation
Epidemiological Research Unit, H:S Bispebjerg University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 1999 Jan;34(1):12-7
Date
Jan-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aging
Blood Group Antigens - genetics
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Dietary Sucrose - adverse effects
Humans
Life Style
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Peptic Ulcer - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Social Class
Tea - adverse effects
Abstract
BACKGROUND: In the Copenhagen Male Study men with the Lewis blood group phenotype Le(a+b-), non-secretors of ABH antigen, and men with the O or the A phenotype in the ABO blood group have been found to have a significantly higher lifetime prevalence of peptic ulcer than others. We investigated the importance of the association of these genetic markers, life-style factors, and social class with lifetime risk of peptic ulcer, testing specifically the hypothesis that the strength of the association of risk factors with peptic ulcer depends on genetic susceptibility. METHODS: Three thousand three hundred and forty-six white men 55-74 years old were included for study. From a questionnaire validated during an interview information was obtained about life-style factors and peptic ulcer history (gastric or duodenal). Potential non-genetic risk factors examined were smoking history, alcohol consumption, physical activity level, consumption of tea and coffee, and use of sugar in tea or coffee. RESULTS: Three hundred and eighty-four men (11.5%) had a history of peptic ulcer; 120 (3.6%) had had an operation due to peptic ulcer. Non-genetic peptic ulcer risk factors identified were ever having been a smoker, use of sugar in tea or coffee, abstention from tea consumption, and low social class. On the basis of these and the genetic factors, it was possible to identify a low-risk group (n = 142) with a lifetime prevalence of 4.2%, several intermediate-risk groups, and a high-risk group (n = 55) with a prevalence of 29%; the odds ratio with 95% confidence limits (OR) was 9.3 (3.4-25.3). Corresponding values with regard to operation were 1.4% and 20.0%; OR = 17.5 (3.7-82.0). Several significant interactions were found; for example, the use of sugar was associated with peptic ulcer risk only when interacting with genetic risk groups. CONCLUSIONS: Considering the role of Helicobacter pylori, it is interesting that the factors identified in this study were able to identify groups with extremely different lifetime risks. This finding and also the finding of strong interactions between genetic and life-style factors and between genetic factors and social class for the risk of peptic ulcer may have both public-health and clinical implications.
PubMed ID
10048726 View in PubMed
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26 records – page 1 of 3.