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Association between sucrose intake and acute coronary event risk and effect modification by lifestyle factors: Malmö Diet and Cancer Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282792
Source
Br J Nutr. 2016 Nov;116(9):1611-1620
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2016
Author
K. Warfa
I. Drake
P. Wallström
G. Engström
E. Sonestedt
Source
Br J Nutr. 2016 Nov;116(9):1611-1620
Date
Nov-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Diet - adverse effects - ethnology
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Energy Intake - ethnology
Feeding Behavior - ethnology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Healthy Lifestyle
Humans
Incidence
Life Style - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology - prevention & control
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk factors
Self Report
Sweden - epidemiology
Urban Health - ethnology
Abstract
Previous studies have suggested that a high intake of sugar-sweetened beverages is positively associated with the risk of a coronary event. However, a few studies have examined the association between sucrose (the most common extrinsic sugar in Sweden) and incident coronary events. The objective of the present study was to examine the associations between sucrose intake and coronary event risk and to determine whether these associations are specific to certain subgroups of the population (i.e. according to physical activity, obesity status, educational level, alcohol consumption, smoking habits, intake of fat and intake of fruits and vegetables). We performed a prospective analysis on 26 190 individuals (62 % women) free from diabetes and without a history of CVD from the Swedish population-based Malmö Diet and Cancer cohort. Over an average of 17 years of follow-up (457 131 person-years), 2493 incident cases of coronary events were identified. Sucrose intake was obtained from an interview-based diet history method, including 7-d records of prepared meals and cold beverages and a 168-item diet questionnaire covering other foods. Participants who consumed >15 % of their energy intake (E%) from sucrose showed a 37 (95 % CI 13, 66) % increased risk of a coronary event compared with the lowest sucrose consumers (
PubMed ID
27774913 View in PubMed
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Beverage patterns among Canadian children and relationship to overweight and obesity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123475
Source
Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2012 Oct;37(5):900-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Adrienne D Danyliw
Hassanali Vatanparast
Nooshin Nikpartow
Susan J Whiting
Author Affiliation
College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada.
Source
Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2012 Oct;37(5):900-6
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Beverages - adverse effects
Body mass index
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child Behavior
Child Development
Child, Preschool
Cluster analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Nutrition Surveys
Obesity - epidemiology - etiology
Overweight - epidemiology - etiology
Risk
Sex Characteristics
Abstract
Sweetened beverage intake has risen in past decades, along with a rise in prevalence of overweight and obesity among children. Our objective was to examine the relationship between beverage intake patterns and overweight and obesity among Canadian children. Beverage intake patterns were identified by cluster analysis of data from the cross-sectional Canadian Community Health Survey 2.2. Intake data were obtained from a single 24-hour recall, height and weight were measured, and sociodemographic data were obtained via interview. Data on children and adolescents aged 2-18 years who met inclusion criteria (n = 10?038) were grouped into the following categories: 2-5 years (male and female), 6-11 years (female), 6-11 years (male), 12-18 years (female), and 12-18 years (male). ?² test was used to compare rates of overweight and obesity across clusters. Logistic regression was used to determine the association between overweight and obesity and beverage intake patterns, adjusting for potential confounders. Clustering resulted in distinct groups of who drank mostly fruit drinks, soft drinks, 100% juice, milk, high-fat milk, or low-volume and varied beverages (termed "moderate"). Boys aged 6-11 years whose beverage pattern was characterized by soft drink intake (553 ± 29 g) had increased odds of overweight-obesity (odds ratio 2.3, 95% confidence interval 1.2-4.1) compared with a "moderate" beverage pattern (23 ± 4 g soft drink). No significant relationship emerged between beverage pattern and overweight and obesity among other age-sex groups. Using national cross-sectional dietary intake data, Canadian children do not show a beverage-weight association except among young boys who drink mostly soft drinks, and thus may be at increased risk for overweight or obesity.
PubMed ID
22694268 View in PubMed
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BMI, eating habits and sleep in relation to salivary counts of mutans streptococci in children - the IDEFICS Sweden study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279480
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2016 Apr;19(6):1088-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Louise Arvidsson
Dowen Birkhed
Monica Hunsberger
Anne Lanfer
Lauren Lissner
Kirsten Mehlig
Staffan Mårild
Gabriele Eiben
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2016 Apr;19(6):1088-92
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body mass index
Body Weight
Child
Child, Preschool
Colony Count, Microbial
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Caries - microbiology - prevention & control
Diet
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Logistic Models
Male
Overweight - microbiology - prevention & control
Saliva - microbiology
Sleep
Streptococcus mutans - isolation & purification
Sweden
Waist Circumference
Abstract
The objective of the present study was to investigate the association between salivary counts of mutans streptococci (MS) and children's weight status, while considering associated covariates. MS ferments carbohydrates from the diet and contributes to caries by lowering the pH in dental plaque. In adults, high counts of MS in saliva have been associated with overweight, but this has not been shown in children.
Cross-sectional study investigating salivary counts of MS, BMI Z-score, waist circumference, meal frequency, sugar propensity and sleep duration, in children.
West Sweden.
Children (n 271) aged 4-11 years.
Medium-high counts of MS were positively associated with higher BMI Z-score (OR=1·6; 95% CI 1·1, 2·3). Positive associations were also found between medium-high counts of MS and more frequent meals per day (OR=1·5; 95% CI 1·1, 2·2), greater percentage of sugar-rich foods consumed (OR=1·1; 95% CI 1·0, 1·3) and female sex (OR=2·4; 95% CI 1·1, 5·4). A negative association was found between medium-high counts of MS and longer sleep duration (OR=0·5; 95% CI 0·3, 1·0).
BMI Z-score was associated with counts of MS. Promoting adequate sleep duration and limiting the intake frequency of sugar-rich foods and beverages could provide multiple benefits in public health interventions aimed at reducing dental caries and childhood overweight.
PubMed ID
26228762 View in PubMed
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The carbon isotope ratio of alanine in red blood cells is a new candidate biomarker of sugar-sweetened beverage intake.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114464
Source
J Nutr. 2013 Jun;143(6):878-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Kyungcheol Choy
Sarah H Nash
Alan R Kristal
Scarlett Hopkins
Bert B Boyer
Diane M O'Brien
Author Affiliation
Center for Alaska Native Health Research, Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, USA.
Source
J Nutr. 2013 Jun;143(6):878-84
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alanine - blood
Alaska
Beverages - adverse effects
Biological Markers - blood
Body mass index
Carbon Isotopes - blood
Diet
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Erythrocytes - chemistry
Female
Hair - chemistry
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - etiology
Sweetening Agents - adverse effects
Abstract
An objective dietary biomarker would help clarify the contribution of sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) intake to obesity and chronic disease risk. Previous studies have proposed the carbon isotope ratio (d(13)C) as a biomarker of SSB intake but found associations that were of modest size and confounded by other components of the diet. We investigated whether the d(13)C values of nonessential amino acids (d(13)CNEAA) in RBCs could provide valid biomarkers that are more specific to SSBs. We assessed the associations of RBC d(13)CNEAA with SSB intake in a study population of 68 Yup'ik people, using gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry to measure d(13)CNEAA and four 24-h dietary recalls to assess intake. Among RBC nonessential amino acids, alanine d(13)C (d(13)Calanine) was strongly correlated with intake of SSBs, added sugar, and total sugar (r = 0.70, 0.59, and 0.57, respectively; P
Notes
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Comment In: J Nutr. 2013 Jun;143(6):763-523616500
PubMed ID
23616504 View in PubMed
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Caries and associated factors in a group of Swedish children 2- 3 years of age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79037
Source
Swed Dent J. 2006;30(4):137-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Bankel Marie
Eriksson Ulla-Carin
Robertson Agneta
Köhler Birgitta
Author Affiliation
Public Dental Service Clinic in Majorna, Göteborg, Sweden. marie@bankel.com
Source
Swed Dent J. 2006;30(4):137-46
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child, Preschool
Dental Caries - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Oral Hygiene
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology - ethnology
Abstract
The reported skew distribution of caries prevalence in preschool children, with a small group of children with very high caries prevalence, stresses the importance of early identification for prevention.The present study aimed to describe the caries prevalence in a group of Swedish preschool children and to identify caries risk factors in this population. 221 children, 2 to 3 years old, agreed to participate in the study (82%). A standardized questionnaire was used to describe socio-economic factors, dietary and oral hygiene habits and exposure to fluoride. Initial and manifest dental caries was diagnosed and the presence of plaque was visually observed without disclosing solution. Saliva and plaque samples were collected for identification of mutans streptococci (MS). For statistical analysis,the Student's t-test,the Chi-square test and Fisher's exact test were used. The caries prevalence among the 2 to 3 year-olds was 7 and 18 percent respectively. An association between early childhood caries and a number of factors was found e.g. the presence of MS and visible plaque, nocturnal meals, frequent sugar consumption, mothers' state of employment and immigrant background. The Public Dental Health Service has been successful in decreasing the number of children with caries, but the challenge remains to be able to control caries in the high-risk group. The skew distribution, with many children without caries and a smaller group with very high caries prevalence, was confirmed.The study provided insight into various factors, useful for monitoring children at risk of developing early childhood caries.
PubMed ID
17243441 View in PubMed
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Consumption of sugar and sugar-sweetened foods and the risk of pancreatic cancer in a prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79900
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Nov;84(5):1171-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Larsson Susanna C
Bergkvist Leif
Wolk Alicja
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. susanna.larsson@ki.se
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Nov;84(5):1171-6
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Carbonated Beverages
Cohort Studies
Diet
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Female
Fruit
Humans
Hyperglycemia - complications
Hyperinsulinism - complications
Male
Middle Aged
Pancreatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Emerging evidence indicates that hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia may be implicated in the development of pancreatic cancer. Frequent consumption of sugar and high-sugar foods may increase the risk of pancreatic cancer by inducing frequent postprandial hyperglycemia, increasing insulin demand, and decreasing insulin sensitivity. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to examine prospectively the association of the consumption of added sugar (ie, sugar added to coffee, tea, cereals, etc) and of high-sugar foods with the risk of pancreatic cancer in a population-based cohort study of Swedish women and men. DESIGN: A food-frequency questionnaire was completed in 1997 by 77 797 women and men aged 45-83 y who had no previous diagnosis of cancer or history of diabetes. The participants were followed through June 2005. RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 7.2 y, we identified 131 incident cases of pancreatic cancer. The consumption of added sugar, soft drinks, and sweetened fruit soups or stewed fruit was positively associated with the risk of pancreatic cancer. The multivariate hazard ratios for the highest compared with the lowest consumption categories were 1.69 (95% CI: 0.99, 2.89; P for trend = 0.06) for sugar, 1.93 (1.18, 3.14; P for trend = 0.02) for soft drinks, and 1.51 (0.97, 2.36; P for trend = 0.05) for sweetened fruit soups or stewed fruit. CONCLUSION: High consumption of sugar and high-sugar foods may be associated with a greater risk of pancreatic cancer.
PubMed ID
17093171 View in PubMed
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Determinants of cariogenic snacking in adolescents in Belfast and Helsinki.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196116
Source
Eur J Oral Sci. 2000 Dec;108(6):504-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2000
Author
R. Freeman
H. Heimonen
P. Speedy
H. Tuutti
Author Affiliation
Dental Public Health Research Group, School of Clinical Dentistry, The Queen's University of Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK. r.freeman@qub.ac.uk
Source
Eur J Oral Sci. 2000 Dec;108(6):504-10
Date
Dec-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attitude to Health
Chi-Square Distribution
Demography
Dental caries - etiology - prevention & control
Diet, Cariogenic
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Female
Finland
Food Habits
Gingival Hemorrhage - prevention & control
Health Education, Dental
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Northern Ireland
Oral Health
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Self Concept
Smoking - adverse effects
Social Class
Toothbrushing
Abstract
The aim of the study was to investigate the determinants of reported snack consumption in adolescents residing in Belfast, Northern Ireland and Helsinki, Finland. Ten % random samples of 14-15 yr old Belfast (n = 628) and Helsinki (n = 600) adolescents were obtained. A questionnaire assessed their demography, oral health knowledge, attitudes and the consumption of cariogenic snacks containing non-milk extrinsic sugars (NMES). Five hundred and eighty-nine (94%) questionnaires were returned in Belfast and 441 (74%) questionnaires in Helsinki. Belfast adolescents had significantly higher levels of oral health knowledge and higher consumption rates for snacks containing NMES. The Helsinki adolescents had more positive attitudes towards their oral health. Multivariant analysis showed that demography was the most direct determinant of cariogenic snacking. The acquisition of oral health knowledge played a minor role. There is a need to develop tailored and focused programmes to promote healthier snacking regimes in adolescents.
PubMed ID
11153925 View in PubMed
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Dietary intakes of carbohydrates in relation to prostate cancer risk: A prospective study in the Malmo Diet and Cancer cohort

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119136
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2012 Dec;96(6):1409-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Drake, I
Sonestedt, E
Gullberg, B
Ahlgren, G
Bjartell, A
Wallström, P
Wirfält, E
Author Affiliation
Research Group in Nutritional Epidemiology, Department of Clinical Sciences in Malm�?????�????�???�??�?�¶, Lund University, Malm�?????�????�???�??�?�¶, Sweden. isabel.drake@med.lu.se
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2012 Dec;96(6):1409-18
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cohort Studies
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Grading
Neoplasm Staging
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Prostate-Specific Antigen - blood
Prostatic Neoplasms - blood - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Questionnaires
Risk
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Dietary carbohydrates have been implicated in relation to prostate cancer.
Our objective was to examine the associations between dietary intakes of carbohydrates, fiber, and their food sources and risk of prostate cancer, overall and by case severity, in the Malm�?????�????�???�??�?�¶ Diet and Cancer cohort.
The analysis included 8128 men aged 45-73 y without a history of cancer, cardiovascular disease, or diabetes and who were classified as adequate energy reporters. After a median follow-up time of 15 y, prostate cancer was diagnosed in 817 men. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to model associations between energy-adjusted nutrient and food intakes with risk of incident prostate cancer, with competing risk of death from non-prostate cancer causes taken into account.
After adjustment for age and other known or potential risk factors, we observed no associations between total carbohydrates or dietary fiber and prostate cancer. We observed positive associations between the intake of low-fiber cereals with overall and low-risk prostate cancer and between intakes of cake and biscuits and rice and pasta with low-risk prostate cancer (all P-trend
Notes
Comment In: Am J Clin Nutr. 2012 Dec;96(6):1249-5123134894
PubMed ID
23134882 View in PubMed
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Dietary protein-to-carbohydrate ratio and added sugar as determinants of excessive gestational weight gain: a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266483
Source
BMJ Open. 2015;5(2):e005839
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Ekaterina Maslova
Thorhallur I Halldorsson
Arne Astrup
Sjurdur F Olsen
Source
BMJ Open. 2015;5(2):e005839
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Denmark
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Obesity - etiology - prevention & control
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - etiology - prevention & control
Prospective Studies
Weight Gain
Abstract
To examine the relation between the protein:carbohydrate (P/C) ratio and added sugar intake in pregnancy and gestational weight gain (GWG).
A prebirth cohort including 103 119 pregnancies enrolled between 1996 and 2003.
All women in Denmark were eligible to participate if they spoke Danish and were planning to carry to term.The pregnant women were recruited and enrolled during their first antenatal visit (6-10 weeks of gestation).
Participants included women with live-born singletons and complete data on dietary intake and GWG, leaving 46 262 women for the analysis.
Macronutrient intake was quantified using a validated food frequency questionnaire administered in the 25th week of gestation. The P/C ratio and added sugar intake were examined in quintiles.
GWG was based on self-reported weight in gestational weeks 12 and 30 and defined as gain in g/week. We used multivariable linear regression, including adjusting for pre-pregnancy body mass index, to calculate relative change in GWG and 95% CI.
Average GWG was 471(224) g/week. The adjusted weight gain was 16 g/week lower (95% CI 9 to 22, p for trend 20%E vs
Notes
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PubMed ID
25670731 View in PubMed
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Effect of changes in an FFQ: comparing data from two national dietary survey instruments among 2-year-olds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123245
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Jan 28;109(2):363-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-28-2013
Author
A L Kristiansen
I T L Lillegaard
B. Lande
L F Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. a.l.kristiansen@medisin.uio.no
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Jan 28;109(2):363-9
Date
Jan-28-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child Development
Child, Preschool
Cross-Over Studies
Databases, Factual
Diet - adverse effects
Diet Surveys
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Energy intake
Feeding Methods
Female
Food analysis
Food Habits
Food Quality
Humans
Male
Norway
Parents
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
In the interpretation of dietary trends, it is important to consider the potential effect of modifications in the dietary assessment method. Therefore, our objective was to explore the comparability of data obtained at two time points by a semi-quantitative FFQ (SFFQ) which has had slight modifications over time. In the national dietary surveys among Norwegian 2-year-olds, diet was assessed by an SFFQ which underwent modifications between the 1999 survey and the 2007 survey. In the present study, fifty-nine families with a 2-year-old child participated by completing both the SFFQ in a crossover design within a month's time. With regard to the reported intake of energy and nutrients, the largest significant differences observed between the two questionnaires were for carbohydrates and added sugar. According to intake of food groups, significant differences were observed for five out of sixteen food groups. Spearman's correlation coefficients for energy, nutrients and food groups ranged from 0.43 (Ca) to 0.85 (soft drinks). Most Bland-Altman plots indicated broad limits of agreement. The differences between the two questionnaires can be explained by changes in the questionnaires, changes in the food composition databases used and random variation. Comparing differences between the questionnaires by maternal educational level, number of children and type of day care revealed minor differences. In conclusion, this study showed that at the group level there was reasonable comparability between the two questionnaires, except for carbohydrates, added sugar and some food groups. Moreover, there were moderate to high correlations for energy, nutrients and food groups.
PubMed ID
22716945 View in PubMed
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