Skip header and navigation

Refine By

95 records – page 1 of 10.

Adolescent dietary patterns in Fiji and their relationships with standardized body mass index.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114873
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2013;10:45
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Jillian T Wate
Wendy Snowdon
Lynne Millar
Melanie Nichols
Helen Mavoa
Ramneek Goundar
Ateca Kama
Boyd Swinburn
Author Affiliation
School of Health and Social Development, Deakin University, Melbourne, Australia. jwate@deakin.edu.au
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2013;10:45
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body Composition
Body Height
Body mass index
Body Weight
Diet - adverse effects
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Female
Fiji - epidemiology
Food Habits
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Meals
Obesity - epidemiology - etiology
Population Groups
Reference Standards
Urban Population
Abstract
Obesity has been increasing in adolescents in Fiji and obesogenic dietary patterns need to be assessed to inform health promotion. The objective of this study was to identify the dietary patterns of adolescents in peri-urban Fiji and determine their relationships with standardized body mass index (BMI-z).
This study analysed baseline measurements from the Pacific Obesity Prevention In Communities (OPIC) Project. The sample comprised 6,871 adolescents aged 13-18 years from 18 secondary schools on the main island of Viti Levu, Fiji. Adolescents completed a questionnaire that included diet-related variables; height and weight were measured. Descriptive statistics and regression analyses were conducted to examine the associations between dietary patterns and BMI-z, while controlling for confounders and cluster effect by school.
Of the total sample, 24% of adolescents were overweight or obese, with a higher prevalence among Indigenous Fijians and females. Almost all adolescents reported frequent consumption of sugar sweetened beverages (SSB) (90%) and low intake of fruit and vegetables (74%). Over 25% of participants were frequent consumers of takeaways for dinner, and either high fat/salt snacks, or confectionery after school. Nearly one quarter reported irregular breakfast (24%) and lunch (24%) consumption on school days, while fewer adolescents (13%) ate fried foods after school. IndoFijians were more likely than Indigenous Fijians to regularly consume breakfast, but had a high unhealthy SSB and snack consumption.Regular breakfast (p
Notes
Cites: Lancet. 2001 Feb 17;357(9255):505-811229668
Cites: Obes Rev. 2001 May;2(2):117-3012119663
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2000 Dec;100(12):1511-2111138444
Cites: Obes Rev. 2004 May;5 Suppl 1:4-10415096099
Cites: Obes Res. 2004 May;12(5):778-8815166298
Cites: JAMA. 2004 Aug 25;292(8):927-3415328324
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1990 Sep;52(3):421-52393004
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1994 Feb;59(2):350-57993398
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1994 Oct;60(4):640-28092104
Cites: Pediatrics. 1997 Sep;100(3 Pt 1):323-99282700
Cites: Appetite. 1999 Aug;33(1):61-7010447980
Cites: Physiol Behav. 2004 Dec 30;83(4):573-815621062
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2005 Feb;93(2):241-715788117
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2006 Apr;30(4):590-416570087
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Aug;84(2):274-8816895873
Cites: Nutr Rev. 2009 Feb;67(2):65-7619178647
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2009 Aug;12(8):1115-2119243677
Cites: Mol Cell Endocrinol. 2010 Mar 25;316(2):104-819628019
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 May;91(5):1342-720237134
Cites: Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2010;19(3):372-8220805082
Cites: Obes Rev. 2011 Nov;12 Suppl 2:3-1122008554
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2012 Feb;95(2):290-622218154
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2011 Jul;14(7):1245-5021129237
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2011 Nov;111(11):1696-70322027052
Cites: J Adolesc Health. 2006 Dec;39(6):842-917116514
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2006;6:29517150112
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2007 Feb;10(2):152-717261224
Cites: Bull World Health Organ. 2007 Sep;85(9):660-718026621
Cites: Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2007;16(4):738-4718042537
Cites: Pac Health Dialog. 2006 Sep;13(2):57-6418181391
Cites: Ann Hum Biol. 2008 Jan-Feb;35(1):1-1018274921
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2008 Jun;16(6):1302-718388902
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Jun;87(6):1662-7118541554
Cites: Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2008;17(3):375-8418818156
PubMed ID
23570554 View in PubMed
Less detail

Analysis of 24-hour recalls of 164 fourth- to sixth-grade Mohawk children in Kahnawake.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205123
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 1998 Jul;98(7):814-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1998

Association between sucrose intake and acute coronary event risk and effect modification by lifestyle factors: Malmö Diet and Cancer Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282792
Source
Br J Nutr. 2016 Nov;116(9):1611-1620
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2016
Author
K. Warfa
I. Drake
P. Wallström
G. Engström
E. Sonestedt
Source
Br J Nutr. 2016 Nov;116(9):1611-1620
Date
Nov-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Diet - adverse effects - ethnology
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Energy Intake - ethnology
Feeding Behavior - ethnology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Healthy Lifestyle
Humans
Incidence
Life Style - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology - prevention & control
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk factors
Self Report
Sweden - epidemiology
Urban Health - ethnology
Abstract
Previous studies have suggested that a high intake of sugar-sweetened beverages is positively associated with the risk of a coronary event. However, a few studies have examined the association between sucrose (the most common extrinsic sugar in Sweden) and incident coronary events. The objective of the present study was to examine the associations between sucrose intake and coronary event risk and to determine whether these associations are specific to certain subgroups of the population (i.e. according to physical activity, obesity status, educational level, alcohol consumption, smoking habits, intake of fat and intake of fruits and vegetables). We performed a prospective analysis on 26 190 individuals (62 % women) free from diabetes and without a history of CVD from the Swedish population-based Malmö Diet and Cancer cohort. Over an average of 17 years of follow-up (457 131 person-years), 2493 incident cases of coronary events were identified. Sucrose intake was obtained from an interview-based diet history method, including 7-d records of prepared meals and cold beverages and a 168-item diet questionnaire covering other foods. Participants who consumed >15 % of their energy intake (E%) from sucrose showed a 37 (95 % CI 13, 66) % increased risk of a coronary event compared with the lowest sucrose consumers (
PubMed ID
27774913 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations between schools' guidelines and pupils' smoking and sweet consumption.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261055
Source
Community Dent Health. 2014 Dec;31(4):234-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
R. Kankaanpää
M. Tolvanen
J. Anttila
S. Lahti
Source
Community Dent Health. 2014 Dec;31(4):234-9
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Attitude to Health
Candy
Carbonated Beverages
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
Finland
Food Dispensers, Automatic
Food Habits
Food Services
Guidelines as Topic
Health Behavior
Humans
Oral Health
Organizational Policy
Schools - organization & administration
Smoking - prevention & control
Snacks
Students
Tobacco, Smokeless
Abstract
The aims were to find out if schools' sweet-selling was associated with pupils' sweet consumption, and whether the school's guideline about leaving the school area was associated with pupils' tobacco and sweet consumption.
Two independently collected datasets from all Finnish upper secondary schools (N = 988) were linked together. The first dataset on schools' sweet-selling (yes/no) and guideline about leaving school area (yes/no) was collected via school principals in 2007 using an Internet questionnaire with a response rate of 49%, n = 480. The second dataset on pupils' self-reported: weekly school-time (0, never; 1, less than once; 2, 1-2 times; 3, 3-5 times), overall sweet consumption frequencies (1, never; 2, 1-2 times; 3, 3-5 times; 4, 6-7 times) and smoking and snuff-using frequencies (1, never; 2, every now and then; 3 = every day) was collected in 2006-2007 in the School Health Promotion Study from pupils. An average was calculated for the school-level with a response rate 80%, n = 790. The total response rate of the linked final data was 42%, n = 414. Mean values of self-reported sweet and tobacco consumption frequencies between sweet-selling and non-sweet-selling schools and between schools with different guidelines were compared using Mann-Whitney test.
Pupils in sweet-selling schools and in schools without a guideline about leaving the school area, more frequently used sweet products and tobacco products than their peers in other schools.
Schools may need help in building permanent guidelines to stop sweet-selling in school and to prevent leaving the school area to decrease pupils' sweet consumption and smoking.
PubMed ID
25665357 View in PubMed
Less detail

Available energy from soft drinks: more than the sum of its parts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143754
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2010 Dec;13(12):1997-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Anwar T Merchant
Avnish Tripathi
Farhan Pervaiz
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, 800 Sumter Street, Columbia, SC 29208, USA. anwar.merchant@post.harvard.edu
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2010 Dec;13(12):1997-9
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Beverages - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Canada
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Diet Surveys
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Humans
Nutritive Value
Sweetening Agents - administration & dosage
Abstract
To evaluate the relationship between energy available from sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) and total energy availability.
Ecological study using food availability data from 1976 to 2007 from the database of the Canadian Socio-Economic Information Management System. The average available total daily energy per capita (kJ (kcal)/d per capita) and percentage of energy from SSB (%E/d per capita) were calculated. A regression analysis was performed with average available total daily energy per capita (kJ (kcal)/d per capita) as the outcome and percentage of energy from SSB as the independent variable (%E/d per capita).
Canada 1976-2007.
None.
Between 1976 and 2007, total available energy increased on average by 669 kJ (160 kcal)/d per capita, and energy from SSB by 155 kJ (37 kcal)/d per capita. Total available energy increased by 434 kJ (104 kcal)/d per capita for a one unit increase in average percentage of energy from SSB.
Total available energy increased as the contribution of energy available from SSB increased. This increase was larger than that explained by energy availability from SSB alone. Reducing energy from soft drinks may contribute to larger reductions in total energy available for consumption.
PubMed ID
20444316 View in PubMed
Less detail

Behavioural and demographic factors during early childhood and poor dental health at 10 years of age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175959
Source
Caries Res. 2005 Mar-Apr;39(2):85-91
Publication Type
Article
Author
M-L Mattila
P. Rautava
M. Aromaa
A. Ojanlatva
P. Paunio
L. Hyssälä
H. Helenius
M. Sillanpää
Author Affiliation
Public Health Centre, Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. malema@utu.fi
Source
Caries Res. 2005 Mar-Apr;39(2):85-91
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Beverages - adverse effects
Child
Child Behavior
Cohort Studies
DMF Index
Dental Caries - complications - prevention & control
Dental Plaque - complications
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
Educational Status
Fathers
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Mothers - education
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Toothbrushing
Abstract
The aim was to elucidate whether variables recorded in early childhood would have a long-lasting predictive value of poor dental health at the age of 10 years in a prospectively followed Finnish population-based cohort setting. The second aim was to find new tools for preventive work in order to improve dental health among children. Poor dental health (dmft + DMFT >or= 5) at 10 years of age was associated with child's nocturnal juice drinking at 18 months. It was associated with the following factors at age 3 years: frequent consumption of sweets; infrequent tooth brushing; plaque and caries on teeth. Of family factors, the following were significant: father's young age at birth of the child; mother's basic 9-year education; mother's caries (i.e. several carious teeth per year), and father's infrequent tooth brushing. Early childhood risk factors of poor dental health seem to be stable even after 10 years of life and the changing of teeth from primary to permanent ones. In preventive work, dental health care staff could offer support to those parents with risk factors in their child rearing tasks.
PubMed ID
15741719 View in PubMed
Less detail

Beverage consumption of children and teens.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152561
Source
Health Rep. 2008 Dec;19(4):17-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Didier Garriguet
Author Affiliation
Health Information and Research Division, Statistics Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0T6. didier.garriguet@statcan.ca
Source
Health Rep. 2008 Dec;19(4):17-22
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Animals
Beverages - statistics & numerical data
Canada
Carbonated Beverages - utilization
Child
Child, Preschool
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Female
Fruit
Health Surveys
Humans
Infant
Male
Milk - utilization
Water
Abstract
According to results from the 2004 Canadian Community Health Survey--Nutrition, children and teens get about one-fifth of their daily calories from beverages. As they get older, boys and girls drink less milk and fruit juice, and more soft drinks and fruit drinks. By ages 14 to 18, boys' average daily consumption of soft drinks matches their consumption of milk, and exceeds their consumption of fruit juice and fruit drinks. Beverage consumption by children and teens varies little by province, except in Newfoundland and Labrador where it tends to be comparatively high, and in British Columbia where it tends to be low.
PubMed ID
19226923 View in PubMed
Less detail

Beverage consumption patterns of Canadian adults aged 19 to 65 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121161
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Dec;15(12):2175-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Nooshin Nikpartow
Adrienne D Danyliw
Susan J Whiting
Hyun J Lim
Hassanali Vatanparast
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Dec;15(12):2175-84
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking
Animals
Beer
Beverages
Canada
Carbonated Beverages
Cluster analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
Drinking
Educational Status
Energy intake
Exercise
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Milk
Sedentary lifestyle
Sex Factors
Sweetening Agents
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate the beverage intake patterns of Canadian adults and explore characteristics of participants in different beverage clusters.
Analyses of nationally representative data with cross-sectional complex stratified design.
Canadian Community Health Survey, Cycle 2.2 (2004).
A total of 14 277 participants aged 19-65 years, in whom dietary intake was assessed using a single 24 h recall, were included in the study. After determining total intake and the contribution of beverages to total energy intake among age/sex groups, cluster analysis (K-means method) was used to classify males and females into distinct clusters based on the dominant pattern of beverage intakes. To test differences across clusters, ?2 tests and 95 % confidence intervals of the mean intakes were used.
Six beverage clusters in women and seven beverage clusters in men were identified. 'Sugar-sweetened' beverage clusters - regular soft drinks and fruit drinks - as well as a 'beer' cluster, appeared for both men and women. No 'milk' cluster appeared among women. The mean consumption of the dominant beverage in each cluster was higher among men than women. The 'soft drink' cluster in men had the lowest proportion of the higher levels of education, and in women the highest proportion of inactivity, compared with other beverage clusters.
Patterns of beverage intake in Canadian women indicate high consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages particularly fruit drinks, low intake of milk and high intake of beer. These patterns in women have implications for poor bone health, risk of obesity and other morbidities.
PubMed ID
22931911 View in PubMed
Less detail

Beverage intake patterns of Canadian children and adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133197
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2011 Nov;14(11):1961-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Adrienne D Danyliw
Hassanali Vatanparast
Nooshin Nikpartow
Susan J Whiting
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutrition and Dietetics, College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, University of Saskatchewan, 110 Science Place, Thorvaldson Building, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5C9, Canada.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2011 Nov;14(11):1961-9
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Beverages - statistics & numerical data
Body mass index
Body Weight
Canada
Child
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Child, Preschool
Cluster analysis
Diet
Diet Surveys - statistics & numerical data
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Public Health
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Little is known of the beverage intake patterns of Canadian children or of characteristics within these patterns. The objective was to determine beverage intake patterns among Canadian children and compare intakes of fourteen types of beverages, along with intakes of vitamin C and Ca, and sociodemographic factors across clusters.
Dietary information was collected using one 24 h recall. Sociodemographic data were collected by interview. Cluster analysis was used to determine beverage intake patterns. Pearson's ?2 and 95 % CI were used to test differences across clusters.
Data from the Canadian Community Health Survey Cycle 2·2.
Children aged 2-18 years with plausible energy intake and complete sociodemographic data (n 10 038) were grouped into the following categories: 2-5-year-old boys and girls, 6-11-year-old girls, 6-11-year-old boys, 12-18-year-old girls and 12-18-year-old boys.
Five beverage clusters emerged for children aged 2-5 years, six clusters for children aged 6-11 years (both sexes) and four clusters for those aged 12-18 years (both sexes). Sweetened beverage clusters appeared in all age-sex groups. Intakes of sweetened beverages ranged from 553 to 1059 g/d and contributed between 2 % and 18 % of total energy intake. Girls 6-11 years of age in the 'soft drink' cluster had lower Ca intake compared with other clusters in that age-sex group. Age and ethnicity differed across clusters for most age-sex groups. Differences for household food security status and income were found; however, no pattern emerged.
Patterns in beverage intake among Canadian children include beverages that are predominantly sugar sweetened. Public health nutrition professionals can use knowledge about beverage patterns among children, as well as the characteristics of these groups, in the development of nutritional programmes and policies.
PubMed ID
21729471 View in PubMed
Less detail

Beverage patterns among Canadian children and relationship to overweight and obesity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123475
Source
Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2012 Oct;37(5):900-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Adrienne D Danyliw
Hassanali Vatanparast
Nooshin Nikpartow
Susan J Whiting
Author Affiliation
College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada.
Source
Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2012 Oct;37(5):900-6
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Beverages - adverse effects
Body mass index
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child Behavior
Child Development
Child, Preschool
Cluster analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Nutrition Surveys
Obesity - epidemiology - etiology
Overweight - epidemiology - etiology
Risk
Sex Characteristics
Abstract
Sweetened beverage intake has risen in past decades, along with a rise in prevalence of overweight and obesity among children. Our objective was to examine the relationship between beverage intake patterns and overweight and obesity among Canadian children. Beverage intake patterns were identified by cluster analysis of data from the cross-sectional Canadian Community Health Survey 2.2. Intake data were obtained from a single 24-hour recall, height and weight were measured, and sociodemographic data were obtained via interview. Data on children and adolescents aged 2-18 years who met inclusion criteria (n = 10?038) were grouped into the following categories: 2-5 years (male and female), 6-11 years (female), 6-11 years (male), 12-18 years (female), and 12-18 years (male). ?² test was used to compare rates of overweight and obesity across clusters. Logistic regression was used to determine the association between overweight and obesity and beverage intake patterns, adjusting for potential confounders. Clustering resulted in distinct groups of who drank mostly fruit drinks, soft drinks, 100% juice, milk, high-fat milk, or low-volume and varied beverages (termed "moderate"). Boys aged 6-11 years whose beverage pattern was characterized by soft drink intake (553 ± 29 g) had increased odds of overweight-obesity (odds ratio 2.3, 95% confidence interval 1.2-4.1) compared with a "moderate" beverage pattern (23 ± 4 g soft drink). No significant relationship emerged between beverage pattern and overweight and obesity among other age-sex groups. Using national cross-sectional dietary intake data, Canadian children do not show a beverage-weight association except among young boys who drink mostly soft drinks, and thus may be at increased risk for overweight or obesity.
PubMed ID
22694268 View in PubMed
Less detail

95 records – page 1 of 10.