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Aboriginal Cultural Competency in Dietetics: A National Survey of Canadian Registered Dietitians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293524
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2017 12 01; 78(4):172-176
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
12-01-2017
Author
Paige Huycke
Jillian Ingribelli
Lee Rysdale
Author Affiliation
a Northern Ontario Dietetic Internship Program, Sault Ste. Marie, ON.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2017 12 01; 78(4):172-176
Date
12-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Clinical Competence
Cultural Competency - education
Cultural Diversity
Diet
Dietary Services
Dietetics - education
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritionists - education
Ontario
Preceptorship
Young Adult
Abstract
Little has been published on cultural competency curriculum and dietetics considering the impact of food-related beliefs and behaviours on health. A 14-item online survey was administered in January 2016 to 145 participants (125 members of Dietitians of Canada Aboriginal Nutrition Network and 20 dietitians with an interest in Aboriginal nutrition). Questions included multiple choice and ranking responses and were pretested by 4 preceptors with the Northern Ontario Dietetic Internship Program (NODIP). Quantitative data analysis included frequencies, pivot tables, and averaging/grouping of ranking scores. A total of 42 individuals (29%) completed the survey. The majority rated the 5 health and cultural competencies and 6 food and nutrition competencies as "important" (90%-98% and 86%-100%, respectively). Overall, the competency related to identifying health status was ranked highest (78%), whereas developing culturally appropriate recipes was ranked lowest (83%). Most participants (95%) believed that all dietitians and graduating dietetic interns should be minimally competent in Aboriginal health and culture. The initial 11 draft competencies for dietetic interns were condensed to 6 minimum and 2 advanced competencies. Results will inform dietitians working with Aboriginal peoples and refinement of NODIP intern and preceptor tools, with the potential to integrate across Canadian dietetic internship programs.
PubMed ID
28333567 View in PubMed
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[A dietitian's help is welcome in malnutrition!]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62075
Source
Lakartidningen. 1994 Jul 27;91(30-31):2758
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-27-1994
Author
A. Neymark
H. Park-Peterson
Source
Lakartidningen. 1994 Jul 27;91(30-31):2758
Date
Jul-27-1994
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diet Therapy
Dietary Services - manpower
Food Service, Hospital - manpower
Humans
Nutrition Disorders - prevention & control
Sweden
Notes
Comment On: Lakartidningen. 1994 Jun 15;91(24):2410-38052027
PubMed ID
8057725 View in PubMed
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[A national document on clinical nutrition. Developmental work for improvement of medical education]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61936
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 Apr 30;94(18):1731-4, 1739
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-30-1997
Author
G. Akner
H. Andersson
E. Forsum
G. Hallmans
P. Thesleff
B. Vessby
Author Affiliation
Karolinska sjukhuset, Stockholm.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 Apr 30;94(18):1731-4, 1739
Date
Apr-30-1997
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Curriculum
Dietary Services
Education, Medical
Educational Measurement
Food Habits
Humans
Nutrition
Nutrition Policy
Nutritional Support
Sweden
PubMed ID
9182183 View in PubMed
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[Attitude of general practitioners to the importance of gender and diet in disease prevention]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10741
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Jan 4;161(1):40-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-4-1999
Author
U. Hølund
G. Boysen
P. Charles
E F Eriksen
O K Overvad
B H Petersson
B. Sandström
A R Thomassen
M A Vittrup
Author Affiliation
Mejeriernes Ernaeringscenter, Arhus.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Jan 4;161(1):40-3
Date
Jan-4-1999
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Denmark
Dietary Services
English Abstract
Female
Food Habits
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Style
Male
Physicians, Family - psychology
Preventive Health Services - economics - organization & administration - standards
Primary Prevention
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Abstract
Three hundred and seventy-four general practitioners (GPs) in Denmark filled in a questionnaire on attitudes to include information on gender and diet in the strategy for prevention of coronary heart disease, cancer, osteoporosis, and overweight/underweight. Risk factors for disease in general were ranked as follows: smoking, alcohol, stress, diet, physical exercise, heredity and hygiene. The patients' lack of motivation, insufficient time for each patient, and inadequate knowledge about nutrition were stated as barriers to dietary counselling. The GPs stated that the gender of the patient was important only to the counselling on osteoporosis. Lack of time and insufficient knowledge were perceived as barriers for including gender specific issues in prevention. It is concluded that GPs consider dietary counselling important but lack time and knowledge. The results point at a need for better pre- and postgraduate training in nutrition, and for a better reimbursement system for time spent on prevention.
PubMed ID
9922687 View in PubMed
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Cardiac rehabilitation services in Denmark: still room for expansion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49576
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2005;33(5):376-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Ann-Dorthe O Zwisler
Ulla I Traeden
Jørgen Videbaek
Mette Madsend
Author Affiliation
Unit of Cardiac Rehabilitation, Department of Cardiology, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. ADO@niph.dk
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2005;33(5):376-83
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiology Service, Hospital - standards
Denmark
Dietary Services
Exercise Therapy
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Diseases - rehabilitation
Humans
Life Style
Patient Education
Practice Guidelines
Questionnaires
Rehabilitation Centers - standards
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking Cessation
Social Support
Abstract
AIM: European cardiologists agree that cardiac rehabilitation (CR) should be offered as an integrated part of cardiac care, and CR guidelines have been published. The authors aimed to ascertain the potential for expanding CR coverage at hospitals in Denmark. METHOD: A cross-sectional questionnaire study was conducted among all hospitals receiving acute cardiac patients (n = 67). The response rate was 79%, with no differences according to catchment area, number of beds, or geographical location. The hospitals were classified as having full CR if all core components (physical training, psychosocial support, dietary counselling, smoking cessation, and pharmaceutical risk factor management) were available during each of three phases: (I) in hospital; (II) outpatient; and (II) community-based services. RESULTS: Many hospitals offered one or more of the CR components during phases I and II: physical training (77%; 77%), psychosocial support (89%; 79%), dietary counselling (85%; 89%), smoking cessation (94%; 68%), and clinical control by a physician (100%; 93%). The content varied greatly. Full phase I CR was offered at 57% (95% confidence interval (95% CI): 44-70%) of the hospitals and 47% (95% CI: 34-60%) offered full phase II CR. Phase III CR was very rare (2% (95% CI: 0-6%). The numbers of patients receiving CR was not registered. CONCLUSION: Marked progress was made in the 1990s in implementing CR; nevertheless, the services are far from fully expanded. Denmark has great potential for improving CR services, as do most other European countries. CR activities need to be registered at Danish hospitals.
PubMed ID
16265807 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1980 Jul;57(7):23-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1980
Author
C. Tougas
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1980 Jul;57(7):23-4
Date
Jul-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dietary Services - standards
Food Service, Hospital - standards
Humans
Nutritional Sciences - education
Quality Control
Quebec
PubMed ID
7399184 View in PubMed
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Construction and evaluation of a self-contained index for assessment of diet quality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140751
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2010 Dec;38(8):794-802
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Johanna Leppälä
Hanna Lagström
Anne Kaljonen
Kirsi Laitinen
Author Affiliation
Turku Institute for Child and Youth Research, Turku, Finland. johanna.leppala@utu.fi
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2010 Dec;38(8):794-802
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Diet - standards
Diet Surveys
Dietary Services
Energy intake
Female
Finland
Guideline Adherence
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Policy
Questionnaires - standards
Self Report
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
To construct and validate a self-contained index for the evaluation of a health-promoting diet in adults.
Participants (n = 103) were healthy volunteer adults aged 20 to 64 years. A food consumption questionnaire containing 55 questions was formulated and evaluated against seven-day food records. Key questions best reflecting the health-promoting diet, defined in nutrition recommendations, were identified by correlation and ROC analyses in comparison to calculated food and nutrient intakes from the food records. A shorter questionnaire was scored to compile an Index of Diet Quality (IDQ).
Based on ROC analyses 18 questions were sufficient to describe the health-promoting diet and comprised the index. IDQ had a sensitivity of 67% and a specificity of 71%. The IDQ score reflected dietary intake, shown as statistically significant correlations between higher IDQ scores and higher intakes of protein (r = 0.35), fibre (r = 0.42), calcium (r = 0.39), iron (r = 0.31), vitamin C (r = 0.31) and a higher ratio of unsaturated to saturated fatty acids (r = 0.23) and a lower intake of saturated fatty acids (r = -0.22) and saccharose (r = -0.25).
IDQ reflects dietary intake of key foods and nutrients associated with health and depicts adherence to dietary recommendations. It is applicable in nutritional studies where diet in its entirety is of interest and also in large-scale studies, being fast in execution with analysis free of complex calculations.
PubMed ID
20846997 View in PubMed
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Cost-effectiveness in healthcare: complexity of the equation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231393
Source
J Can Diet Assoc. 1988;49(2):80-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
A. Archambault
Source
J Can Diet Assoc. 1988;49(2):80-5
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cost-Benefit Analysis - methods
Decision Making
Dietary Services - economics
Efficiency
Food Service, Hospital - economics
Humans
Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Quality of Life
Abstract
Integrating scientific changes, citizens' needs and economic constraints has become a challenge. New types of cost-effective services, technologies and products must be found. Manufacturers, hospital administrators and health professionals must be capable of effectively documenting the benefits, risks and costs of their services to society and the quality of care to patients. Choices must be made to decide upon appropriate actions in allocating and using resources. The concepts of cost-benefit analysis and cost-effectiveness analysis should be understood. Identifying and valuing costs and benefits, measuring effectiveness, and assessing quality of life are complex and difficult issues. They are discussed in reference to Canadian studies on the cost-effectiveness of nutrition support. The need for further research to improve cost-effectiveness of nutrition support is stressed.
PubMed ID
10312528 View in PubMed
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83 records – page 1 of 9.