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394 records – page 1 of 40.

Aboriginal Eskimo diet in modern perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature694
Source
American Anthropologist. 79:309-316.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1977
Author
Draper, H.H.
Author Affiliation
University of Guelph
Source
American Anthropologist. 79:309-316.
Date
1977
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Point Hope
Wainwright
Nunapitchuk
Diet, traditional
Nutrition
Dietary Carbohydrates
Dietary protein
Acculturation
Lactose tolerance
Sucrose tolerance
Cholesterol
Blood pressure
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1122.
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[Actual diet of children in orphanages]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31096
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2002;71(5):7-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
A T Elizarov
L P Volkotrub
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2002;71(5):7-10
Date
2002
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Nutrition
Calcium - analysis
Child
Child Nutrition
Diet
Dietary Proteins - analysis
Energy intake
English Abstract
Female
Food
Food Services - standards
Humans
Iodine - analysis
Male
Nutrition Surveys
Orphanages
Phosphorus - analysis
Siberia
Trace Elements - analysis
Vitamins - analysis
Abstract
The account of quantitative and qualitative structure of diets of children of children's houses has revealed infringements in organisation of mode of a meals, and also unbalance of diet on structure of food substances, including on iodine, that can promote development of iodine-dependence diseases.
PubMed ID
12599990 View in PubMed
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[Adequacy of the diet served to Tarahumara children in indigenous boarding schools of northern Mexico].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143615
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2010 Jan-Feb;52(1):23-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Joel Monárrez-Espino
Graciela Ivette Béjar-Lío
Guillermo Vázquez-Mendoza
Author Affiliation
Unidad de Investigación en Epidemiología Clínica, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Chihuahua, México.
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2010 Jan-Feb;52(1):23-9
Language
Spanish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Diet
Dietary Carbohydrates - analysis
Dietary Fats - analysis
Dietary Proteins - analysis
Energy intake
Female
Food Services
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Menu Planning
Mexico
Micronutrients - analysis
Nutrition Policy
Nutritional Requirements
Residential Facilities
Schools
Abstract
To assess the adequacy and variability of the diet served to Tarahumara children in indigenous boarding schools.
Records of food and drinks served for meals, weighed daily, were obtained from Monday through Friday for 10 consecutive weeks in two selected boarding schools. Nutrient intake for Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays was calculated and analyzed for weeks 3, 5 and 7.
The number of food items used per week ranged from 33 to 46. The most frequently utilized items were cooking oil, fortified corn tortilla, milk, onion, sugar and beans. Total energy served per day fluctuated between 1309 and 2919 Kcal; proteins comprised 10.5 to 21.2% (45 to 127 g/day), carbohydrates 40.7 to 61.9% (145 to 433 g/day), and lipids 22.5 to 48.1% (45 to 125 g/day) of the total. Daily micronutrient content ranges were: iron 15-33 mg, calcium 686-1795 mg, zinc 8-19 mg, vitamin A 118-756 mcg, vitamin B(9) 42-212 mcg, and vitamin B(12) 0.8-5 mcg.
There was significant daily variability in the diet, which was hypercaloric due to the high lipid content, and yet insufficient in vitamins B(9), B(12) and A.
PubMed ID
20464250 View in PubMed
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Adherence to dietary recommendations for Swedish adults across categories of greenhouse gas emissions from food.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293496
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 Dec; 20(18):3381-3393
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Camilla Sjörs
Fredrik Hedenus
Arvid Sjölander
Annika Tillander
Katarina Bälter
Author Affiliation
1Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics (MEB),Karolinska Institutet,Nobels väg 12a,SE-171 77 Stockholm,Sweden.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 Dec; 20(18):3381-3393
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Carbon Dioxide - analysis
Diet
Diet Records
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Exercise
Female
Greenhouse Gases - analysis
Humans
Male
Micronutrients - administration & dosage
Middle Aged
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Surveys
Patient compliance
Recommended dietary allowances
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
To explore associations between diet-related greenhouse gas emissions (GHGE), nutrient intakes and adherence to the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations among Swedish adults.
Diet was assessed by 4d food records in the Swedish National Dietary Survey. GHGE was estimated by linking all foods to carbon dioxide equivalents, using data from life cycle assessment studies. Participants were categorized into quartiles of energy-adjusted GHGE and differences between GHGE groups regarding nutrient intakes and adherence to nutrient recommendations were explored.
Sweden.
Women (n 840) and men (n 627) aged 18-80 years.
Differences in nutrient intakes and adherence to nutrient recommendations between GHGE groups were generally small. The dietary intake of participants with the lowest emissions was more in line with recommendations regarding protein, carbohydrates, dietary fibre and vitamin D, but further from recommendations regarding added sugar, compared with the highest GHGE group. The overall adherence to recommendations was found to be better among participants with lower emissions compared with higher emissions. Among women, 27 % in the lowest GHGE group adhered to at least twenty-three recommendations compared with only 12 % in the highest emission group. For men, the corresponding figures were 17 and 10 %, respectively.
The study compared nutrient intakes as well as adherence to dietary recommendations for diets with different levels of GHGE from a national dietary survey. We found that participants with low-emission diets, despite higher intake of added sugar, adhered to a larger number of dietary recommendations than those with high emissions.
PubMed ID
28879831 View in PubMed
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Allocating protein to reproduction in arctic reindeer and caribou.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92511
Source
Physiol Biochem Zool. 2008 Nov-Dec;81(6):835-55
Publication Type
Article
Author
Barboza Perry S
Parker Katherine L
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology and Wildlife, Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, Alaska 99775-7000, USA. ffpsb@uaf.edu
Source
Physiol Biochem Zool. 2008 Nov-Dec;81(6):835-55
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Body Composition
Body Weight
Dietary Proteins - metabolism
Digestion - physiology
Eating - physiology
Female
Male
Nitrogen - metabolism
Pregnancy
Proteins - metabolism
Reindeer - blood - physiology
Reproduction - physiology
Seasons
Abstract
Reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus) and caribou (Rangifer tarandus granti) use body stores (capital) and food intake (income) for survival and reproduction. Intakes of low-nitrogen (N) food declined in winter and increased in spring (51-83 g dry matter kg(-0.75) d(-1)). Reindeer calved before regaining food intake, whereas caribou calved 28 d later. Body N was conserved by minimizing oxidation of amino acid N to urea. Maternal protein stored from early winter was used for 96% of fetal growth in reindeer but only 84% of fetal growth in later-birthing caribou. Both subspecies rely on maternal body protein for 91% of the protein deposited in the neonate via milk over the first 4 wk. All females lost body protein over winter, but lactating females continued to lose protein while nonreproductive females regained protein. Net costs of lactation above maintenance were greater for N (110%-130%) than for energy (40%-59%). Large fat stores in reindeer spare body protein from oxidation in winter, whereas in caribou, less fat with the same body protein favors migration when food is inadequate. The resilience of Rangifer populations to variable patterns of food supply and metabolic demand may be related to their ability to alter the timing and allocation of body protein to reproduction.
Notes
Erratum In: Physiol Biochem Zool. 2009 Jan-Feb;82(1):104
PubMed ID
18702605 View in PubMed
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American Academy of Pediatrics. Nutrition Committee of the Canadian Paediatric Society and the Committee on Nutrition of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Breast-feeding. A commentary in celebration of the International Year of the Child, 1979.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature248226
Source
Pediatrics. 1978 Oct;62(4):591-601
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1978
Source
Pediatrics. 1978 Oct;62(4):591-601
Date
Oct-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Feeding
Canada
Cholesterol - metabolism
Dietary Proteins - metabolism
Humans
Infant Food
Infant Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Infant, Newborn
Iron - metabolism
Lipid Metabolism
Milk, Human - immunology - metabolism - physiology
Obesity - etiology
Pediatrics
Societies, Medical
United States
Abstract
1. Full-term newborn infants should be breastfed, except if there are specific contraindications or when breast-feeding is unsuccessful. 2. Education about breast-feeding should be provided in schools for all children, and better education about breast-feeding and infant nutrition should be provided in the curriculum of physicians and nurses. Information about breast-feeding should also be presented in public communications media. 3. Prenatal instruction should include both theoretical and practical information about breast-feeding. 4. Attitudes and practices in prenatal clinics and in maternity wards should encourage a climate which favors breast-feeding. The staff should include nurses and other personnel who are not only favorably disposed toward breast-feeding but also knowledgeable and skilled in the art. 5. Consultation between maternity services and agencies committed to breast-feeding should be strengthened. 6. Studies should be conducted on the feasibility of breast-feeding infants at day nurseries adjacent to places of work subsequent to an appropriate leave of absence following the birth of an infant.
PubMed ID
362368 View in PubMed
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Analysis of 24-hour recalls of 164 fourth- to sixth-grade Mohawk children in Kahnawake.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205123
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 1998 Jul;98(7):814-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1998

[Analysis of the nutrition of elderly people in Ukraine]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61588
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2003;72(5):3-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Iu G Grigorov
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2003;72(5):3-7
Date
2003
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Appetite
Cholesterol - blood
Diet
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Electrocardiography
English Abstract
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Policy
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status
Sex Factors
Taste - physiology
Tooth - physiology
Ukraine
Abstract
A comparative analysis of the factual nutrition and health indices for 1970-2001 was made involving 2950 persons aged 60-89 years, residents of Ukraine. The state of nutrition of 530 single non-working citizens of NIS states, being taken care of by a social care service, was studied. The assortment structure of food products is sharply reduced, the contents of main nutrients and biologically active substances are unbalanced. The is conditioned by poor socio-economic of the people of this age category, on the one hand and by age-related changes of the digestive system, taste sensitivity, etc., on the other. It has been shown that more than 15% of older has a protein-energetic malnutrition.
PubMed ID
14619607 View in PubMed
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394 records – page 1 of 40.