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Acute effect of alginate-based preload on satiety feelings, energy intake, and gastric emptying rate in healthy subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132787
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2012 Sep;20(9):1851-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Morten Georg Jensen
Mette Kristensen
Anita Belza
Jes C Knudsen
Arne Astrup
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutrition, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark. mmgj@life.ku.dk
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2012 Sep;20(9):1851-8
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alginates - therapeutic use
Anti-Obesity Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Glucose - drug effects
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Body mass index
Cross-Over Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dietary Fiber - therapeutic use
Double-Blind Method
Energy Intake - drug effects - physiology
Female
Gastric Emptying - drug effects - physiology
Glucuronic Acid - therapeutic use
Heart Rate - drug effects
Hexuronic Acids - therapeutic use
Humans
Insulin - blood
Male
Postprandial Period
Reference Values
Satiation - drug effects - physiology
Abstract
Viscous dietary fibers such as sodium alginate extracted from brown seaweed have received much attention lately for their potential role in energy regulation through the inhibition of energy intake and increase of satiety feelings. The aim of our study was to investigate the effect on postprandial satiety feelings, energy intake, and gastric emptying rate (GER), by the paracetamol method, of two different volumes of an alginate-based preload in normal-weight subjects. In a four-way placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover trial, 20 subjects (age: 25.9 ± 3.4 years; BMI: 23.5 ± 1.7 kg/m(2)) were randomly assigned to receive a 3% preload concentration of either low volume (LV; 9.9 g alginate in 330 ml) or high volume (HV; 15.0 g alginate in 500 ml) alginate-based beverage, or an iso-volume placebo beverage. The preloads were ingested 30 min before a fixed breakfast and again before an ad libitum lunch. Consumption of LV-alginate preload induced a significantly lower (8.0%) energy intake than the placebo beverage (P = 0.040) at the following lunch meal, without differences in satiety feelings or paracetamol concentrations. The HV alginate significantly increased satiety feelings (P = 0.038), reduced hunger (P = 0.042) and the feeling of prospective food consumption (P = 0.027), and reduced area under the curve (iAUC) paracetamol concentrations compared to the placebo (P = 0.05). However, only a 5.5% reduction in energy intake was observed for HV alginate (P = 0.20). Although they are somewhat contradictory, our results suggest that alginate consumption does affect satiety feelings and energy intake. However, further investigation on the volume of alginate administered is needed before inferring that this fiber has a possible role in short-term energy regulation.
PubMed ID
21779093 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cereal grains and coronary heart disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47588
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2002 Jan;56(1):1-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
A S Truswell
Author Affiliation
Biochemistry Department, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2002 Jan;56(1):1-14
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cereals - chemistry - drug effects
Cholesterol - blood
Coronary Disease - blood - diet therapy
Dietary Fiber - therapeutic use
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutritive Value
Abstract
Cereal grains and their products provide around 30% of total energy intake in British adults, (much more than any of the other major food groups). Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the largest single cause of death in Britain and many other Western countries. This review examines the question whether there is a relation between cereal consumption and CHD. Several of the nutrients in cereals have known potential for reducing risk factors for CHD: the linoleic acid, fibre, vitamin E, selenium and folate. Cereals also contain phytoestrogens of the lignan family and several phenolic acids with antioxidant properties. Processing generally reduces the content of these nutrients and bioprotective substances. Although cereals at the farm gate are very low in salt, processed cereal foods, eg bread and some breakfast cereals, are high-salt foods and thus could contribute to raising blood pressure. Human experiments have clearly shown that oat fibre tends to lower plasma total and LDL cholesterol but wheat fibre does not. Rice bran and barley may also lower cholesterol but most people do not eat enough barley to have an effect. Cereal foods with low glycaemic index such as pasta and oats are beneficial for people with diabetes and might lower plasma lipids. Between 1996 and 2001 an accumulation of five very large cohort studies in the USA, Finland and Norway have all reported that subjects consuming relatively large amounts of whole grain cereals have significantly lower rates of CHD. This confirms an earlier report from a small British cohort. The protective effect does not seem to be due to cholesterol-lowering. While cohort studies have shown this consistent protective effect of whole grain cereals, there has been (only one) randomised controlled secondary prevention trial of advice to eat more cereal fibre. In this there was no reduction of the rate of reinfarction. The trial had some weaknesses, eg there were eight different diets, compliance was not checked objectively, and duration was for only 2 y. It appears valid to make health claims (as now permitted by the US FDA) that whole grain cereal foods and oat meal or bran may reduce the risk of CHD.
PubMed ID
11840174 View in PubMed
Less detail

Consumption of buckwheat modulates the post-prandial response of selected gastrointestinal satiety hormones in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115631
Source
Metabolism. 2013 Jul;62(7):1021-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Danielle M Stringer
Carla G Taylor
Paulyn Appah
Heather Blewett
Peter Zahradka
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutritional Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
Source
Metabolism. 2013 Jul;62(7):1021-31
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Body mass index
Canada
Cross-Over Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - complications - diet therapy
Dietary Fiber - therapeutic use
Fagopyrum - chemistry
Female
Gastric Inhibitory Polypeptide - blood - secretion
Gastrointestinal Tract - secretion
Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 - blood - secretion
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oryza sativa - chemistry
Overweight - complications
Postprandial Period
Satiety Response
Seeds - chemistry
Single-Blind Method
Abstract
In healthy participants and those with diet-controlled type 2 diabetes (T2DM), to (1) compare the acute 3-hour post-prandial response of glucose, insulin and other gastrointestinal hormones known to influence food intake and glucose metabolism after consumption of a food product made from whole grain buckwheat flour versus rice flour; (2) determine the effect of daily consumption of a food product made from whole grain buckwheat flour on fasting glucose, lipids and apolipoproteins.
Healthy participants or those with T2DM consumed either buckwheat or rice crackers. Blood samples were collected at baseline and 15, 30, 45, 60, 120 and 180minutes after consumption. In a second phase of the study, participants consumed one serving of buckwheat crackers daily for 1week; fasting blood samples from day 1 and day 7 were analyzed.
Post-prandial plasma glucagon-like peptide-1, glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide and pancreatic polypeptide were altered after consuming buckwheat versus rice crackers. Interestingly, changes in these hormones did not lead to changes in post-prandial glucose, insulin or C-peptide concentrations. Significant correlations were observed between both fasting concentrations and post-prandial responses of several of the hormones examined. Interestingly, certain correlations were present only in the healthy participant group or the T2DM group. There was no effect of consuming buckwheat for one week on fasting glucose, lipids or apolipoproteins in either the healthy participants or those with T2DM.
Although the buckwheat cracker did not modify acute glycemia or insulinemia, it was sufficient to modulate gastrointestinal satiety hormones.
PubMed ID
23485142 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dietary determinants of hepatic steatosis and visceral adiposity in overweight and obese youth at risk of type 2 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104988
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2014 Apr;99(4):804-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Rebecca C Mollard
Martin Sénéchal
Andrea C MacIntosh
Jacqueline Hay
Brandy A Wicklow
Kristy D M Wittmeier
Elizabeth A C Sellers
Heather J Dean
Lawrence Ryner
Lori Berard
Jonathan M McGavock
Author Affiliation
Manitoba Institute of Child Health, Winnipeg, Canada (RCM, MS, ACM, JH, BAW, KDMW, EACS, HJD, and JMM); the Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada (RCM, MS, ACM, JH, BAW, KDMW, EACS, HJD, and JMM); the Department of Physiotherapy, Health Sciences Centre, Winnipeg, Canada (KDMW); CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada (LR); and the Diabetes Research Group Health Sciences Centre, Winnipeg, Canada (LB).
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2014 Apr;99(4):804-12
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Body mass index
Carbonated Beverages - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - etiology
Diet, High-Fat - adverse effects
Dietary Fiber - therapeutic use
Dietary Sucrose - adverse effects
Fatty Liver - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Intra-Abdominal Fat - pathology
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Obesity, Abdominal - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Overweight - diet therapy - etiology - pathology - physiopathology
Risk factors
Sedentary lifestyle
Abstract
Dietary determinants of hepatic steatosis, an important precursor for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, are undefined.
We explored the roles of sugar and fat intake as determinants of hepatic steatosis and visceral obesity in overweight adolescents at risk of type 2 diabetes.
This was a cross-sectional study of dietary patterns and adipose tissue distribution in 74 overweight adolescents (aged: 15.4 ± 1.8 y; body mass index z score: 2.2 ± 0.4). Main outcome measures were hepatic steatosis (=5.5% fat:water) measured by magnetic resonance spectroscopy and visceral obesity (visceral-to-subcutaneous adipose tissue ratio =0.25) measured by magnetic resonance imaging. Main exposure variables were dietary intake and habits assessed by the Harvard Youth Adolescent Food Frequency Questionnaire.
Hepatic steatosis and visceral obesity were evident in 43% and 44% of the sample, respectively. Fried food consumption was more common in adolescents with hepatic steatosis than in adolescents without hepatic steatosis (41% compared with 18%; P = 0.04). Total fat intake (ß = 0.51, P = 0.03) and the consumption of >35% of daily energy intake from fat (OR: 11.8; 95% CI: 1.6, 86.6; P = 0.02) were both positively associated with hepatic steatosis. Available carbohydrate (ß = 0.54, P = 0.02) and the frequent consumption of soda were positively associated with visceral obesity (OR: 6.4; 95% CI: 1.2, 34.0; P = 0.03). Daily fiber intake was associated with reduced odds of visceral obesity (OR: 0.82; 95% CI: 0.68, 0.98; P = 0.02) but not hepatic steatosis.
Hepatic steatosis is associated with a greater intake of fat and fried foods, whereas visceral obesity is associated with increased consumption of sugar and reduced consumption of fiber in overweight and obese adolescents at risk of type 2 diabetes.
PubMed ID
24522441 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dietary factors and the incidence of cancer of the stomach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238045
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1985 Dec;122(6):947-59
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1985
Author
H A Risch
M. Jain
N W Choi
J G Fodor
C J Pfeiffer
G R Howe
L W Harrison
K J Craib
A B Miller
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1985 Dec;122(6):947-59
Date
Dec-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada
Diet - adverse effects
Dietary Fats - adverse effects
Dietary Fiber - therapeutic use
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nitrites - adverse effects
Retrospective Studies
Risk
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Vitamins - therapeutic use
Abstract
A case-control study of diet and stomach cancer was conducted during 1979-1982 in Toronto, Winnipeg, and St. John's Canada. Two hundred forty-six histologically verified cancer cases were individually matched by age, sex, and area of residence to 246 randomly selected population controls. Daily nutrient consumption values were calculated from quantitative diet history questionnaire data through use of the US Department of Agriculture Food Composition Data Bank, which was extended and modified for Canadian items. For the analysis, continuous conditional logistic regression methods were used. It was found that consumption of dietary fiber was associated with decreased risk of gastric cancer; the odds ratio estimate of trend was 0.40/10 g average daily intake of fiber (i.e., 0.40(1.5)/15 g, etc.) (p less than 10(-8)). Also, average daily consumption of nitrite, chocolate, and carbohydrate was associated with increasing trends in risk, with odds ratio estimates, respectively, 2.6/mg (p less than 10(-4)), 1.8/10 g (p less than 10(-4)), and 1.5/100 g (p = 0.015). While citrus fruit intake appeared to be somewhat protective (odds ratio = 0.75/100 g daily average, p = 0.0056), vitamin C intake was less so, and vitamin E not at all. Thus, a number of dietary components seem to be implicated in the pathogenesis of stomach cancer.
PubMed ID
2998182 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effect of oat bran supplemented diet on hypercholesterolaemia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215076
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1995 Jun;13(2):118-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1995
Author
I. Winblad
T. Joensuu
H. Korpela
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Science, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1995 Jun;13(2):118-21
Date
Jun-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Avena sativa
Body mass index
Cholesterol - blood
Dietary Fiber - therapeutic use
Finland
Food, Fortified
Humans
Hypercholesterolemia - diet therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
To examine the effect of oat bran supplemented diet on serum cholesterol in hypercholesterolaemic males who had failed to comply with a conventional lipid lowering diet.
Run-in period with a conventional lipid lowering diet followed by supplements of oat bran (70 g per day) for six weeks. Wash-out period without oat bran ended the survey.
The workplace of Pyhäsalmi Mine, Finland.
59 volunteer male miners whose serum cholesterol was over 6.1 mmol/l in spite of a conventional lipid lowering diet.
Differences between means for serum cholesterol concentrations at different phases of the survey.
During the oat bran supplemented diet serum total cholesterol decreased by 6.2%, from 6.93 to 6.50 mmol/l (p = 0.000) and LDL cholesterol by 9.5%, from 4.64 to 4.20 mmol/l (p = 0.000). During the wash-out phase serum total cholesterol increased by 2.3%, to 6.65 mmol/l (p = 0.084) and LDL cholesterol by 5.0%, to 4.41 mmol/l (p = 0.021). The reduction in cholesterol levels on oat bran supplement correlated positively with the pre-treatment values.
Oat bran seems to offer an additional dietary means of coping with hypercholesterolaemia.
PubMed ID
7569475 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Experience using a diet enriched with crude-fiber carbohydrates (plantix) in treating diabetic patients at sanatoria and health resorts].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241348
Source
Ter Arkh. 1984;56(10):102-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984

Fibre intake and incident colorectal cancer depending on fibre source, sex, tumour location and Tumour, Node, Metastasis stage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272508
Source
Br J Nutr. 2015 Sep 28;114(6):959-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-28-2015
Author
Alexandra Vulcan
Jenny Brändstedt
Jonas Manjer
Karin Jirström
Bodil Ohlsson
Ulrika Ericson
Source
Br J Nutr. 2015 Sep 28;114(6):959-69
Date
Sep-28-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cohort Studies
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology - pathology - prevention & control
Dietary Fiber - therapeutic use
Edible Grain
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fruit
Functional Food
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Nutrition Surveys
Prospective Studies
Rectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology - pathology - prevention & control
Registries
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Urban Health - ethnology
Vegetables
Abstract
Studies on fibre intake and incident colorectal cancer (CRC) indicate inverse associations. Differences by tumour stage have not been examined. We examined associations between fibre intake and its sources, and incidental CRC. Separate analyses were carried out on the basis of sex, tumour location and the Tumour, Node, Metastasis (TNM) classification. The Malmö Diet and Cancer Study is a population-based cohort study, including individuals aged 45-74 years. Dietary data were collected through a modified diet history method. The TNM classification was obtained from pathology/clinical records and re-evaluated. Among 27 931 individuals (60% women), we found 728 incident CRC cases during 428 924 person-years of follow-up. Fibre intake was inversely associated with CRC risk (P(trend) = 0.026). Concerning colon cancer, we observed borderline interaction between fibre intake and sex (P = 0.052) and significant protective association restricted to women (P(trend) = 0.013). Intake of fruits and berries was inversely associated with colon cancer in women (P(trend) = 0.022). We also observed significant interactions between intakes of fibre (P = 0.048) and vegetables (P = 0.039) and sex on rectal cancer, but no significant associations were seen between intake of fibre, or its sources, in either of the sexes. Except for inverse associations between intake of fibre-rich cereal products and N0- and M0-tumours, we did not observe significant associations with different TNM stages. Our findings suggest different associations between fibre intake and CRC depending on sex, tumour site and fibre source. High fibre intake, especially from fruits and berries, may, above all, prevent tumour development in the colon in women. No clear differences by TNM classification were detected.
PubMed ID
26281852 View in PubMed
Less detail

Low-fat, high-fiber diet favorably affects several independent risk markers of ischemic heart disease: observations on blood lipids, coagulation, and fibrinolysis from a trial of middle-aged Danes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54906
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 1994 Apr;59(4):935-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1994
Author
P. Marckmann
B. Sandström
J. Jespersen
Author Affiliation
Research Department of Human Nutrition, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 1994 Apr;59(4):935-9
Date
Apr-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Coagulation
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage - metabolism
Dietary Fiber - therapeutic use
Female
Fibrinolysis
Humans
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - diet therapy - prevention & control
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
We served a low-fat (28% of energy), high-fiber (3.3 g/MJ) diet according to Nordic nutrition recommendations (Rec diet), and a high-fat diet (39% of energy) corresponding to the average Danish diet (Dane diet) for periods of 2 wk in a randomized crossover study of 21 healthy middle-aged individuals. The Rec diet resulted in lower serum concentrations of low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (medians: 2.77 vs 3.04 mmol/L, P
PubMed ID
8147341 View in PubMed
Less detail

No association among total dietary fiber, fiber fractions, and risk of breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187767
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2002 Nov;11(11):1507-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2002

13 records – page 1 of 2.