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Adherence to dietary recommendations for Swedish adults across categories of greenhouse gas emissions from food.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293496
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 Dec; 20(18):3381-3393
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Camilla Sjörs
Fredrik Hedenus
Arvid Sjölander
Annika Tillander
Katarina Bälter
Author Affiliation
1Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics (MEB),Karolinska Institutet,Nobels väg 12a,SE-171 77 Stockholm,Sweden.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 Dec; 20(18):3381-3393
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Carbon Dioxide - analysis
Diet
Diet Records
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Exercise
Female
Greenhouse Gases - analysis
Humans
Male
Micronutrients - administration & dosage
Middle Aged
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Surveys
Patient compliance
Recommended dietary allowances
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
To explore associations between diet-related greenhouse gas emissions (GHGE), nutrient intakes and adherence to the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations among Swedish adults.
Diet was assessed by 4d food records in the Swedish National Dietary Survey. GHGE was estimated by linking all foods to carbon dioxide equivalents, using data from life cycle assessment studies. Participants were categorized into quartiles of energy-adjusted GHGE and differences between GHGE groups regarding nutrient intakes and adherence to nutrient recommendations were explored.
Sweden.
Women (n 840) and men (n 627) aged 18-80 years.
Differences in nutrient intakes and adherence to nutrient recommendations between GHGE groups were generally small. The dietary intake of participants with the lowest emissions was more in line with recommendations regarding protein, carbohydrates, dietary fibre and vitamin D, but further from recommendations regarding added sugar, compared with the highest GHGE group. The overall adherence to recommendations was found to be better among participants with lower emissions compared with higher emissions. Among women, 27 % in the lowest GHGE group adhered to at least twenty-three recommendations compared with only 12 % in the highest emission group. For men, the corresponding figures were 17 and 10 %, respectively.
The study compared nutrient intakes as well as adherence to dietary recommendations for diets with different levels of GHGE from a national dietary survey. We found that participants with low-emission diets, despite higher intake of added sugar, adhered to a larger number of dietary recommendations than those with high emissions.
PubMed ID
28879831 View in PubMed
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Alkylresorcinol metabolites in urine correlate with the intake of whole grains and cereal fibre in free-living Swedish adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125563
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Jan 14;109(1):129-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-14-2013
Author
Matti Marklund
Rikard Landberg
Agneta Andersson
Per Åman
Afaf Kamal-Eldin
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Science, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7051, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden. matti.marklund@slu.se
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Jan 14;109(1):129-36
Date
Jan-14-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Algorithms
Alkylation
Biological Markers - urine
Cereals - chemistry - metabolism
Creatinine - urine
Diet Records
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage - metabolism
Female
Food Handling
Humans
Hydroxybenzoates - metabolism - urine
Male
Middle Aged
Phenols - metabolism - urine
Phenylpropionates
Propionates - metabolism - urine
Reproducibility of Results
Resorcinols - metabolism - urine
Secale cereale - chemistry
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
Alkylresorcinols (AR) have been established as short/medium-term biomarkers for whole grain (WG) wheat and rye intake; and AR metabolites, 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid and 3-(3,5-dihydroxyphenyl)-propanoic acid, have been suggested as complementary biomarkers to AR. The present study examined the medium-term reproducibility and relative validity of urinary AR metabolites as biomarkers for WG and cereal fibre intake. A total of sixty-six free-living Swedes completed 3 d weighed food records and provided single 24 h urine collections and morning urine spot samples on two occasions, 2-3 months apart. The medium-term reproducibility of urinary AR metabolites was moderate when assessed in 24 h collections and lower in creatinine (CR)-adjusted morning urine. Mean AR metabolite 24 h excretions correlated well with total WG (r(s) 0·31-0·52, P
PubMed ID
22470195 View in PubMed
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[An 8-month-long controlled trial of low fat/high fiber diet. Effect on blood lipids and blood pressure in young healthy individuals].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221230
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1993 Apr 26;155(17):1289-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-26-1993
Author
B. Sandström
P. Marckmann
N. Bindslev
Author Affiliation
Landbohøjskolen, Forskningsinstitut for Human Ernaering, Frederiksberg.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1993 Apr 26;155(17):1289-93
Date
Apr-26-1993
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Blood pressure
Denmark
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Lipids - blood
Male
Time Factors
Notes
Comment In: Ugeskr Laeger. 1993 Jul 19;155(29):2288-98392231
PubMed ID
8389495 View in PubMed
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An incident case-referent study on plasma enterolactone and breast cancer risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18873
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2002 Aug;41(4):168-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
Kerstin Hultén
Anna Winkvist
Per Lenner
Robert Johansson
Herman Adlercreutz
Göran Hallmans
Author Affiliation
Epidemiology Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Sweden. kerstin.hulten@epiph.umu.se
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2002 Aug;41(4):168-76
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
4-Butyrolactone - analogs & derivatives - blood
Aging
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cohort Studies
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Female
Humans
Lignans - blood
Questionnaires
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Using a nested case-referent design, we evaluated the relationship between plasma levels of the lignan enterolactone and the risk of developing breast cancer. METHODS: 248 cases and 492 referents were selected from three population-based cohorts in northern Sweden. Blood samples were donated at enrollment. All blood samples were stored at -80 degrees C. Cases and referents were matched for age, date of blood sample and sampling centre. Breast cancer cases were identified through the regional and national cancer registries. RESULTS: Plasma enterolactone was lower among smokers in all cohorts and in subjects with BMI 28 in one of the cohorts. Low plasma concentrations of enterolactone, below the 12.5(th) percentile (mean plasma enterolactone 2.9 nmol/l), were associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. Also, high values of plasma enterolactone, above the 87.5(th) percentile (mean plasma enterolactone 58.2 nmol/l) were significantly associated with an increased breast cancer risk among women from two cohorts with only incident cases and a higher number of pre-menopausal women. High plasma enterolactone concentrations among older women from a mammary screening project with mostly prevalent cases were associated with a non-significant slightly reduced breast cancer risk. CONCLUSION: Very low plasma concentrations of enterolactone were associated with an increased breast cancer risk in all three cohorts. In two of the cohorts, with only incident cases, very high plasma concentrations were also associated with an increased breast cancer risk. In the third cohort with mainly screen-detected cases from a mammary screening program, high plasma enterolactone concentrations were associated with a weak decreased breast cancer risk.
PubMed ID
12242585 View in PubMed
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Assessing the validity of a self-administered food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ) in the adult population of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114696
Source
Nutr J. 2013;12:49
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Lin Liu
Peizhong Peter Wang
Barbara Roebothan
Ann Ryan
Christina Sandra Tucker
Jennifer Colbourne
Natasha Baker
Michelle Cotterchio
Yanqing Yi
Guang Sun
Author Affiliation
Division of Community Health and Humanities, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University, 300 Prince Philip Drive, St. John's, NL A1B 3V6, Canada.
Source
Nutr J. 2013;12:49
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Carotenoids - administration & dosage
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Female
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Newfoundland and Labrador
Nutrition Assessment
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Vitamin A - administration & dosage
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Abstract
The Food- Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) is a dietary assessment tool frequently used in large-scale nutritional epidemiology studies. The goal of the present study is to validate a self-administered version of the Hawaii FFQ modified for use in the general adult population of Newfoundland and Labrador (NL).
Over a one year period, 195 randomly selected adults completed four 24-hour dietary recalls (24-HDRs) by telephone and one subsequent self-administered FFQ. Estimates of energy and nutrients derived from the 24-HDRs and FFQs were compared (protein, carbohydrate, fibre, fat, vitamin A, carotene, vitamin D, and calcium). Data were analyzed using the Pearson's correlation coefficients, cross-classification method, and Bland-Altman plots.
The mean nutrient intake values of the 24-HDRs were lower than those of the FFQs, except for protein in men. Sex and energy-adjusted de-attenuated Pearson correlation coefficients for each nutrient varied from 0.13 to 0.61. Except for protein in men, all correlations were statistically significant with p?
Notes
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PubMed ID
23590645 View in PubMed
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[Association between alcohol intake and diet quality]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89792
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Feb 23;171(9):695-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-23-2009
Author
Bøgh-Sørensen Leif
Biltoft-Jensen Anja
Groth Margit Velsing
Matthiessen Jeppe
Fagt Sisse
Hels Ole
Author Affiliation
Afdeling for Ernaering, Fødevareinstituttet, Danmarks Tekniske Universitet, DK-2860 Søborg.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Feb 23;171(9):695-9
Date
Feb-23-2009
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking
Diet - standards
Diet Surveys
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Policy
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Since 1995 the Danish national dietary surveys have shown an increased alcohol intake in the Danish population. The aim of this study is to investigate the association between diet quality, alcohol intake and drinking pattern. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The Danish National Dietary Survey 2000-2002 included 3,151 adults (1,684 women, 1,467 men; 18-75 years). The participants recorded their intake of food and beverages daily for seven consecutive days. For each individual, a diet quality index was calculated based on the intake of dietary fibre and saturated fat in relation to the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations (NNR). RESULTS: A poorer diet quality was observed both with increased alcohol intake (units per week) and with number of weekly drinking days. In both cases, the trend was more pronounced for men than for women. The group of men and women with the highest diet quality had a mean alcohol consumption, which was in agreement with the NNR, and fewer drinking days per week than groups with a lower diet quality. CONCLUSION: Increased alcohol intake is associated with lower diet quality. The results from the present study support the NNR recommendations for alcohol intake and the introduction of a number of alcohol free days each week.
PubMed ID
19257994 View in PubMed
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Association of total energy intake and macronutrient consumption with colorectal cancer risk: results from a large population-based case-control study in Newfoundland and Labrador and Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125827
Source
Nutr J. 2012;11:18
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Zhuoyu Sun
Lin Liu
Peizhong Peter Wang
Barbara Roebothan
Jin Zhao
Elizabeth Dicks
Michelle Cotterchio
Sharon Buehler
Peter T Campbell
John R McLaughlin
Patrick S Parfrey
Author Affiliation
Division of Community Health and Humanities, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St, John's, NL, Canada.
Source
Nutr J. 2012;11:18
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Cholesterol - administration & dosage
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Fatty Acids - administration & dosage
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - administration & dosage
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Newfoundland and Labrador - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Diet is regarded as one of the most important environmental factors associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. A recent report comprehensively concluded that total energy intake does not have a simple relationship with CRC risk, and that the data were inconsistent for carbohydrate, cholesterol and protein. The objective of this study was to identify the associations of CRC risk with dietary intakes of total energy, protein, fat, carbohydrate, fiber, and alcohol using data from a large case-control study conducted in Newfoundland and Labrador (NL) and Ontario (ON), Canada.
Incident colorectal cancer cases (n = 1760) were identified from population-based cancer registries in the provinces of ON (1997-2000) and NL (1999-2003). Controls (n = 2481) were a random sample of residents in each province, aged 20-74 years. Family history questionnaire (FHQ), personal history questionnaire (PHQ), and food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) were used to collect study data. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association of intakes of total energy, macronutrients and alcohol with CRC risk.
Total energy intake was associated with higher risk of CRC (OR: 1.56; 95% CI: 1.21-2.01, p-trend = 0.02, 5th versus 1st quintile), whereas inverse associations emerged for intakes of protein (OR: 0.85, 95%CI: 0.69-1.00, p-trend = 0.06, 5th versus 1st quintile), carbohydrate (OR: 0.81, 95%CI: 0.63-1.00, p-trend = 0.05, 5th versus 1st quintile) and total dietary fiber (OR: 0.84, 95% CI:0.67-0.99, p-trend = 0.04, 5th versus 1st quintile). Total fat, alcohol, saturated fatty acids, monounsaturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and cholesterol were not associated with CRC risk.
This study provides further evidence that high energy intake may increase risk of incident CRC, whereas diets high in protein, fiber, and carbohydrate may reduce the risk of the disease.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22449145 View in PubMed
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Associations between school meal-induced dietary changes and metabolic syndrome markers in 8-11-year-old Danish children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281572
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2016 Aug;55(5):1973-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Camilla T Damsgaard
Christian Ritz
Stine-Mathilde Dalskov
Rikard Landberg
Ken D Stark
Anja Biltoft-Jensen
Inge Tetens
Arne Astrup
Kim F Michaelsen
Lotte Lauritzen
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2016 Aug;55(5):1973-84
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Biomarkers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Blood pressure
Child
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Cluster analysis
Cross-Over Studies
Denmark
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage - analysis
Docosahexaenoic Acids - blood
Energy intake
Exercise
Female
Fishes
Food Services
Fruit
Healthy Diet
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Meals
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood
Schools
Seafood
Treatment Outcome
Triglycerides - blood
Vegetables
Waist Circumference
Abstract
We recently showed that provision of Nordic school meals rich in fish, vegetables and potatoes and with reduced intakes of fat improved blood pressure, insulin resistance assessed by the homeostatic model (HOMA-IR), and plasma triacylglycerol despite increasing waist circumference in Danish 8-11-year-olds. This study explored whether intake or biomarkers of key dietary components in the schools meals were associated with these metabolic syndrome (MetS) markers during the 6-month intervention.
Data from 7-day dietary records and measurements of whole-blood docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3), blood pressure, fasting blood MetS markers, waist circumference and android/total fat mass assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry collected at baseline, 3 and 6 months from 523 children were analyzed in linear mixed-effects models adjusted for puberty, growth and fasting.
After adjustment for multiple testing, whole-blood DHA was negatively associated with HOMA-IR (P 
PubMed ID
27084093 View in PubMed
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[Can health claims made on food be scientifically substantiated? Review on satiety and weight management]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89551
Source
Laeknabladid. 2009 Mar;95(3):195-200
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Gunnarsdottir Ingibjorg
Due Annette
Karhunen Leila
Lyly Marika
Author Affiliation
ingigun@landspitali.is
Source
Laeknabladid. 2009 Mar;95(3):195-200
Date
Mar-2009
Language
Icelandic
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Product Safety - legislation & jurisprudence
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
European Union
Evidence-Based Medicine
Food Labeling - legislation & jurisprudence
Government Regulation
Humans
Legislation, Food
Nutrition Policy
Nutritive Value
Obesity - diet therapy - physiopathology
Satiation
Treatment Outcome
Weight Loss
Abstract
Obesity is becoming an increasing health problem and results when energy intake exceeds energy expenditure. Food has a crucial role in weight management. The new EU legislation on nutrition and health claims permits the use of weight regulation and satiety related health claims on foods, if they are based on generally accepted scientific evidence. In this review the current knowledge on food properties, that have been proposed to affect satiety and/or energy expenditure and thus might be useful in weight control are considered, as part of the project "Substantiation of weight regulation and satiety related health claims on foods" funded by the Nordic Innovation Centre. At this point the scientific evidence of the short term effects of dietary fibers and proteins in relation to satiety seems to be convincing. However, it might be challenging to make product specific satiety and weight management claims as the dose response is not always known. On the other hand two step health claims might be applied, for example rich in dietary fibre - dietary fibre can increase satiety or rich in protein - protein can increase satiety.
PubMed ID
19318712 View in PubMed
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157 records – page 1 of 16.