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108 records – page 1 of 11.

Adipose tissue fatty acids and insulin sensitivity in elderly men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98176
Source
Diabetologia. 2010 May;53(5):850-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
D. Iggman
J. Arnlöv
B. Vessby
T. Cederholm
P. Sjögren
U. Risérus
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Diabetologia. 2010 May;53(5):850-7
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - chemistry
Aged
Chromatography, Gas
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - etiology
Dietary Fats - adverse effects
Docosahexaenoic Acids - analysis
Eicosapentaenoic Acid - analysis
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - analysis
Glucose Clamp Technique
Health Surveys
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Palmitic Acid - analysis
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Sweden
Abstract
AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Dietary fatty acids may affect insulin sensitivity. Adipose tissue fatty acid composition partly reflects long-term dietary intake, but data from large studies regarding relationships with insulin sensitivity are lacking. We aimed to determine the association between adipose tissue fatty acids and insulin sensitivity in elderly Swedish men. METHODS: In a cross-sectional analysis of the community-based Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (n = 795, mean age 71 years), adipose tissue biopsies were obtained and fatty acid composition was determined by gas-liquid chromatography. Insulin sensitivity was measured directly by a euglycaemic clamp. RESULTS: Palmitic acid (16:0), the major saturated fatty acid (SFA) in the diet and in adipose tissue, was negatively correlated with insulin sensitivity (r = -0.14), as were 16:1 n-7 (r = -0.15), 20:3 n-6 (r = -0.31), 20:4 n-6 (r = -0.38), 22:4 n-6 (r = -0.37) and 22:5 n-3 (r = -0.24; p
Notes
RefSource: Diabetologia. 2010 May;53(5):799-801
PubMed ID
20127308 View in PubMed
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Adipose tissue trans-fatty acids and changes in body weight and waist circumference.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105926
Source
Br J Nutr. 2014 Apr 14;111(7):1283-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-14-2014
Author
Camilla P Hansen
Tina L Berentzen
Jane N Østergaard
Christina C Dahm
Lars I Hellgren
Erik B Schmidt
Anne Tjønneland
Thorkild I A Sørensen
Kim Overvad
Marianne U Jakobsen
Author Affiliation
Section for Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Bartholins Allé 2, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2014 Apr 14;111(7):1283-91
Date
Apr-14-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue, White - metabolism
Biological Markers - metabolism
Biopsy, Needle
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Dietary Fats - adverse effects - metabolism
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Linoleic Acids, Conjugated - adverse effects - metabolism
Lost to Follow-Up
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - etiology - metabolism - pathology
Oleic Acids - adverse effects - metabolism
Questionnaires
Registries
Trans Fatty Acids - adverse effects - metabolism
Waist Circumference
Weight Gain
Abstract
Previous studies have suggested that the intake of trans-fatty acids (TFA) plays a role in the development of obesity. The proportions of adipose tissue fatty acids not synthesised endogenously in humans, such as TFA, usually correlate well with the dietary intake. Hence, the use of these biomarkers may provide a more accurate measure of habitual TFA intake than that obtained with dietary questionnaires. The objective of the present study was to investigate the associations between the proportions of specific TFA in adipose tissue and subsequent changes in weight and waist circumference (WC). The relative content of fatty acids in adipose tissue biopsies from a random sample of 996 men and women aged 50-64 years drawn from a Danish cohort study was determined by GC. Baseline data on weight, WC and potential confounders were available together with information on weight and WC 5 years after enrolment. The exposure measures were total trans-octadecenoic acids (18:1t), 18:1 ?6-10t, vaccenic acid (18:1 ?11t) and rumenic acid (18:2 ?9c, 11t). Data were analysed using multiple regression with cubic spline modelling. The median proportion of total adipose tissue 18:1t was 1.52% (90% central range 0.98, 2.19) in men and 1.47% (1.01, 2.19) in women. No significant associations were observed between the proportions of total 18:1t, 18:1 ?6-10t, vaccenic acid or rumenic acid and changes in weight or WC. The present study suggests that the proportions of specific TFA in adipose tissue are not associated with subsequent changes in weight or WC within the exposure range observed in this population.
PubMed ID
24286469 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption and breast cancer risk in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12015
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1991 Jul;2(4):247-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1991
Author
M. Ewertz
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Registry, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen.
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1991 Jul;2(4):247-52
Date
Jul-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dietary Fats - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
The influence of alcohol consumption on breast cancer risk was evaluated in a population-based case-control study, including 1,486 cases diagnosed over a one-year (1983-84) period in Denmark. Cases were identified from the files of the nationwide clinical trial of the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group and the Danish Cancer Registry. The control group was an age-stratified random sample of 1,336 women from the general population. Data on risk factors were collected by self-administered questionnaires. The association of alcohol consumption with breast cancer risk varied with age and dietary fat intake. Among women aged 50-59 years, with a fat intake in the lowest quartile, the risk of breast cancer increased with increasing consumption of alcohol. A consumption of 24 g or more per day was associated with an 18-fold increased risk compared with abstainers. For women in other age groups, alcohol consumption had no significant association with breast cancer risk.
PubMed ID
1873455 View in PubMed
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An association between dietary arachidonic acid, measured in adipose tissue, and ulcerative colitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140034
Source
Gastroenterology. 2010 Dec;139(6):1912-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Punyanganie S A de Silva
Anja Olsen
Jane Christensen
Erik Berg Schmidt
Kim Overvaad
Anne Tjonneland
Andrew R Hart
Author Affiliation
Department of Gastroenterology, Norfolk & Norwich University Hospital NHS Trust, Norwich, United Kingdom. punyanganie@yahoo.com
Source
Gastroenterology. 2010 Dec;139(6):1912-7
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - metabolism - pathology
Aged
Arachidonic Acid - adverse effects - metabolism
Biological Markers - metabolism
Biopsy
Colitis, Ulcerative - epidemiology - etiology - metabolism
Denmark - epidemiology
Dietary Fats - adverse effects - metabolism
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
Dietary arachidonic acid, an n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-6 PUFA), might be involved in the etiology of ulcerative colitis (UC). We performed a prospective cohort study to determine whether high levels of arachidonic acid in adipose tissue samples (which reflects dietary intake) are associated with UC.
We analyzed data collected from 57,053 men and women in the EPIC-Denmark Prospective Cohort Study from 1993 to 1997. Adipose tissue biopsy samples were collected from gluteal regions at the beginning of the study, the cohort was monitored over subsequent years, and participants who developed UC were identified. A subcohort of 2510 randomly selected participants were used as controls. Concentrations of arachidonic acid were measured in adipose tissue samples. In the analysis, arachidonic acid levels were divided into quartiles; relative risks (RR) were calculated and adjusted for smoking, use of aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and levels of n-3 PUFAs.
A total of 34 subjects (56% men) developed incident UC at a median age of 58.8 years (range, 50.0-69.0 years). Those in the highest quartile for arachidonic acid concentrations in adipose tissue had an RR for UC of 4.16 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.56-11.04); a trend per 0.1% increase in arachidonic acid of 1.77 in RR was observed (95% CI: 1.38-2.27). The fraction attributed the highest levels of arachidonic acid was 40.3%.
Individuals with the highest relative concentrations of arachidonic acid in adipose tissue have a significantly greater risk of developing UC. Dietary modifications might therefore prevent UC or reduce disease symptoms.
PubMed ID
20950616 View in PubMed
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Associations between dietary patterns and obesity phenotypes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148666
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2009 Dec;33(12):1419-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
A-M Paradis
G. Godin
L. Pérusse
M-C Vohl
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Laval University, Québec, Canada. marie-claude.vohl@crchul.ulaval.ca
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2009 Dec;33(12):1419-26
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Diet Records
Dietary Fats - adverse effects
Female
Food Habits - psychology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology - genetics
Phenotype
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Waist Circumference
Young Adult
Abstract
To examine whether dietary patterns are associated with obesity phenotypes.
Cross-sectional study.
We recruited 664 participants aged between 18 and 55 years. Dietary data were collected from a food frequency questionnaire. A factor analysis was performed to derive dietary patterns. Body mass index (BMI), weight and waist girth were recorded using standard procedures. Fat mass and fat-free mass were assessed by electrical bioimpedance. Obesity was defined as having a BMI> or =30 kg m(-2) and a positive FHO (FHO+) as having at least one obese first-degree relative.
Two dietary patterns were identified; Western and Prudent. The Western pattern was mainly characterized by a higher consumption of refined grains, French fries, red meats, condiments, processed meats and regular soft drinks whereas the Prudent pattern was mainly characterized by a higher consumption of non-hydrogenated fat, vegetables, eggs and fish and seafood. Subjects in the top tertile of the Western pattern had higher BMI, weight, waist girth, waist-to-hip ratio and fat mass than those in the lower tertile. In contrast, subjects in the top tertile of the Prudent pattern had lower BMI, weight, waist girth, fat mass, HDL-cholesterol levels, and lower triglyceride levels than those in the lowest tertile. Individuals in the upper tertile of the Western pattern were more likely to be obese (obesity was defined as having a BMI> or =30 kg m(-2)) (OR=1.82, 95% CI 1.16-2.87) whereas those in the upper tertile of the Prudent pattern were less likely to be obese (OR=0.62, 95% CI 0.40-0.96). These latter significant associations were only observed among those with FHO+. No such association was observed among FHO- individuals.
Individuals having a high score of Western pattern were more likely to be obese and those having a high score of the Prudent pattern were less likely to be obese, and this is particularly among individuals with an FHO+.
PubMed ID
19736556 View in PubMed
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Asthma but not smoking-related airflow limitation is associated with a high fat diet in men: results from the population study "Men born in 1914", Malmö, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11276
Source
Monaldi Arch Chest Dis. 1996 Feb;51(1):16-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1996
Author
K. Ström
L. Janzon
I. Mattisson
H E Rosberg
M. Arborelius
Author Affiliation
Dept of Lung Medicine, Central Hospital Karlskrona, Sweden.
Source
Monaldi Arch Chest Dis. 1996 Feb;51(1):16-21
Date
Feb-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Confidence Intervals
Data Collection
Dietary Fats - adverse effects
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Prospective Studies
Pulmonary Ventilation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Function Tests
Risk factors
Sampling Studies
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate whether there is an association between asthma and the intake of food with pro-oxidant or antioxidant activity (fat, alcohol, iron, zinc, and vitamins A and C), and to analyse whether any such association is specific to asthma or is found in airflow limitation in general. This study deals with 478 men, who were randomly selected from all the men born in Malmö in 1914. They were investigated using spirometry and their medical, occupational and dietary history was recorded in 1982-1983, at the age of 68 yrs, as part of the cohort study "Men born in 1914". Asthma was defined as a past or present physician's or nurse's diagnosis of asthma and airflow limitation was defined as a forced expiratory volume in one second/vital capacity ratio (FEV1/VC) of less than 70%. The relative risk of having asthma or airflow limitation as related to dietary intake at the age of 68 yrs was analysed after adjustments for smoking history and body mass index. Asthma was reported in 21 men and was not related to smoking history. Asthma was more common in men with a high fat intake (relative risk of asthma 1.74 for a 10% increase in fat intake, 95% confidence interval for the relative risk 1.13-2.68). The consumption of alcohol was higher for current smokers than ex-smokers and nonsmokers, and the intake of carbohydrates, vitamin C and iron was lower. Airflow limitation without asthma was present in 156 men and was related to smoking but not to dietary intake. Men with asthma had a significantly higher intake of fat than men without asthma. This difference appeared to be specific to asthma and was not found in airflow limitation in general.
PubMed ID
8901315 View in PubMed
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Atherogenesis. An epidemiological model based on the presence of unnatural trans and cis isomers of unsaturated fatty acids in the maternal diet and in mothers milk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60175
Source
Med Hypotheses. 1986 Nov;21(3):323-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1986
Author
J. Booyens
Source
Med Hypotheses. 1986 Nov;21(3):323-33
Date
Nov-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arteriosclerosis - etiology - prevention & control
Cell Division - drug effects
Dietary Fats - adverse effects - analysis
Fatty Acid Desaturases - antagonists & inhibitors
Fatty Acids, Essential - metabolism
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - adverse effects - analysis
Humans
Meat - analysis
Milk, Human - analysis
Muscle, Smooth - drug effects
Plant Oils - analysis
Stereoisomerism
Abstract
The hypothesis that the presence of unnatural trans and cis isomers of unsaturated fatty acids in the maternal diet and in human mothers milk could be responsible for initiating atherosclerosis in utero or in infants is proposed. It is suggested that the key etiological factor involved in the formation of atherosclerotic plaques could be uncontrolled division of smooth muscle cells of the intima resulting from the intracellular excess of linoleic acid and deficiency of its metabolites gamma-linolenic acid and dihomogamma-linolenic acid. This imbalance is brought about by competitive inhibition of the enzyme delta-6-desaturase by unnatural trans and cis unsaturated fatty acids. Delta-6-desaturase is the enzyme responsible for converting linoleic acid to dihomogamma-linolenic acid. The cellular presence of unnatural trans and cis isomers of unsaturated fatty acids would therefore enhance increased levels of linoleic acid and deficiency of its metabolites gamma-linolenic acid and dihomogamma-linolenic acid. It is proposed that prophylaxis against the effects of delta-6-desaturase inhibition could be achieved by the adoption of an Eskimo-like diet containing the essential fatty acid metabolites gamma-linolenic acid and/or dihomogamma-linolenic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid per se in high concentrations.
PubMed ID
3642201 View in PubMed
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Biomarkers of milk fat and the risk of myocardial infarction in men and women: a prospective, matched case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96924
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Jul;92(1):194-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Eva Warensjö
Jan-Håkan Jansson
Tommy Cederholm
Kurt Boman
Mats Eliasson
Göran Hallmans
Ingegerd Johansson
Per Sjögren
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. eva.warensjo@pubcare.uu.se
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Jul;92(1):194-202
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Blood pressure
Cohort Studies
Dietary Fats - adverse effects
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Milk - adverse effects
Models, Statistical
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - physiopathology
Odds Ratio
Patient Selection
Phospholipids - blood - pharmacology
Questionnaires
Reference Values
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Characteristics
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: High intakes of saturated fat have been associated with cardiovascular disease, and milk fat is rich in saturated fat. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate the association between the serum milk fat biomarkers pentadecanoic acid (15:0), heptadecanoic acid (17:0), and their sum (15:0+17:0) and a first myocardial infarction (MI). DESIGN: The study design was a prospective case-control study nested within a large population-based cohort in Sweden. Included in the study were 444 cases (307 men) and 556 controls (308 men) matched on sex, age, date of examination, and geographic region. Clinical, anthropometric, biomarker fatty acid, physical activity, and dietary data were collected. The odds of a first MI were investigated by using conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: In women, proportions of milk fat biomarkers in plasma phospholipids were significantly higher (P
PubMed ID
20484449 View in PubMed
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Body fatness in active individuals reporting low lipid and alcohol intake.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213979
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1995 Nov;49(11):824-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1995
Author
A. Tremblay
B. Buemann
G. Thériault
C. Bouchard
Author Affiliation
Physical Activity Sciences Laboratory, Laval University, Ste-Foy, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1995 Nov;49(11):824-31
Date
Nov-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Body Composition
Case-Control Studies
Dietary Fats - adverse effects
Exercise
Humans
Male
Nutrition Surveys
Obesity - diagnosis - etiology
Quebec
Abstract
To evaluate body fatness in subjects complying with common public health guidelines for lipid and alcohol intake as well as physical activity participation.
A sample of 358 male subjects who participated in phase 1 of the Quebec Family Study.
The association between adiposity, lipid and alcohol intake and physical activity participation was analyzed in the overall sample. A comparison of body fatness in individuals adhering or not to public health recommendations was also performed.
Significant positive correlations were observed between the percentage of dietary energy as lipid and adiposity indicators. Accordingly, subjects classified as low-fat consumers displayed significantly lower levels of fat mass and subcutaneous adiposity compared to high-fat consumers. When subjects reporting low lipid and alcohol intake and regular participation in vigorous physical activities were compared to those exhibiting opposite behaviors, the between-group difference in subcutaneous adiposity was doubled and this was essentially explained by an increase in the difference for truncal subcutaneous adiposity.
These results indicate that the adherence to a lifestyle characterized by high-fat and alcohol intake as well as sedentariness promotes fat gain, particularly in the trunk area.
PubMed ID
8557020 View in PubMed
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108 records – page 1 of 11.