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Association between dairy food consumption and risk of myocardial infarction in women differs by type of dairy food.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118747
Source
J Nutr. 2013 Jan;143(1):74-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Emma Patterson
Susanna C Larsson
Alicja Wolk
Agneta Åkesson
Author Affiliation
Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. emma.patterson@ki.se
Source
J Nutr. 2013 Jan;143(1):74-9
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Butter - adverse effects
Cheese - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Dairy Products - adverse effects
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Registries
Risk
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The relation between dairy foods, particularly specific foods, and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains unclear. We examined the association between total, as well as specific, dairy food intakes and incidence of myocardial infarction (MI) in a prospective population-based cohort. We followed 33,636 women (aged 48-83 y), free from CVD, cancer, and diabetes at baseline (1997), in the Swedish Mammography Cohort. Consumption of milk, cultured milk/yogurt, cheese, cream, crème fraiche, and butter was obtained from a validated self-administered FFQ at baseline. We used Cox proportional hazards regression models to estimate HRs and 95% CIs, adjusted for relevant CVD risk factors. MI incidence was ascertained from national registries. Over 11.6 y of follow-up, we ascertained 1392 cases of MI. When the highest quintile was compared with the lowest quintile, total dairy food intake was inversely associated with MI risk [multivariable adjusted HR: 0.77 (95% CI: 0.63, 0.95)]. Among specific dairy food products, total cheese was inversely associated [HR: 0.74 (95% CI: 0.60, 0.91)] and butter used on bread but not on cooking was positively associated [HR: 1.34 (95% CI: 1.02, 1.75)] with MI risk. Other specific dairy food products were not significantly associated with MI risk. No differences were observed between consumption of specific low-fat and high-fat dairy foods, expressed as either absolute intakes or intakes relative to the total, and MI risk. Failure to consider dairy foods as a heterogeneous group in future studies could hamper important insights of relevance for the development of dietary guidelines.
PubMed ID
23173172 View in PubMed
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Association of Long-Term Dietary Fat Intake, Exercise, and Weight with Later Cognitive Function in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276114
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2016 Feb;20(2):146-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
J. Lehtisalo
J. Lindström
T. Ngandu
M. Kivipelto
S. Ahtiluoto
P. Ilanne-Parikka
S. Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi
J G Eriksson
M. Uusitupa
J. Tuomilehto
J. Luchsinger
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2016 Feb;20(2):146-54
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Body mass index
Body Weight
Cognition
Cognition Disorders - etiology
Dementia - etiology
Diabetes Mellitus - prevention & control
Diet
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Energy intake
Exercise
Female
Finland
Food Habits
Glucose Intolerance - complications
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications
Waist Circumference
Weight Loss
Abstract
To investigate associations of long-term nutrient intake, physical activity and obesity with later cognitive function among the participants in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study, in which a lifestyle intervention was successful in diabetes prevention.
An active lifestyle intervention phase during middle age (mean duration 4 years) and extended follow-up (additional 9 years) with annual lifestyle measurements, followed by an ancillary cognition assessment.
5 research centers in Finland.
Of the 522 middle-aged, overweight participants with impaired glucose tolerance recruited to the study, 364 (70%) participated in the cognition assessment (mean age 68 years).
A cognitive assessment was executed with the CERAD test battery and the Trail Making Test A on average 13 years after baseline. Lifestyle measurements included annual clinical measurements, food records, and exercise questionnaires during both the intervention and follow-up phase.
Lower intake of total fat (p=0.021) and saturated fatty acids (p=0.010), and frequent physical activity (p=0.040) during the whole study period were associated with better cognitive performance. Higher BMI (p=0.012) and waist circumference (p=0.012) were also associated with worse performance, but weight reduction prior to the cognition assessment predicted worse performance as well (decrease vs. increase, p=0.008 for BMI and p=0.002 for waist).
Long-term dietary fat intake, BMI, and waist circumference have an inverse association with cognitive function in later life among people with IGT. However, decreases in BMI and waist prior to cognitive assessment are associated with worse cognitive performance, which could be explained by reverse causality.
PubMed ID
26812510 View in PubMed
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Can adverse effects of dietary fat intake be overestimated as a consequence of dietary fat underreporting?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16566
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2005 Dec;8(8):1322-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Berit Lilienthal Heitmann
Lauren Lissner
Author Affiliation
Research Unit for Dietary Studies and Danish Epidemiology Science Centre, Institute of Preventive Medicine, Copenhagen University Hospital, DK-1399 Copenhagen K, Denmark. blh@ipm.hosp.dk
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2005 Dec;8(8):1322-7
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Bias (epidemiology)
Denmark
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Energy Metabolism - physiology
Humans
Lipoproteins, LDL Cholesterol - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Nitrogen - urine
Nutrition Policy
Obesity - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Regression Analysis
Self Disclosure
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe the consequences of systematic reporting bias by the obese for diet-disease relationships. DESIGN: The present report used 24-hour urinary nitrogen and estimates of 24-hour energy expenditure to assess error in diet reporting, and examined the consequence of accounting for this error for associations between dietary fat intake and serum low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol. SETTING: Sub-study to the Danish MONICA (Monitoring Trends and Determinants in Cardiovascular Disease) project, carried out in 1987-1988. SUBJECTS: A random sub-sample of the adult Danish male population (n = 152). RESULTS: Correcting dietary fat for underreporting error weakened, rather than strengthened, the association between dietary fat intake and LDL-cholesterol by reducing the slope of the regression from beta = 3.4, P = 0.02 to beta = 2.7, P = 0.04. CONCLUSION: This example illustrates that systematic underreporting of dietary fat by high-risk groups such as the obese may produce an overestimated association. These results imply that previous epidemiological studies showing a positive association between percentage of energy from fat and other health outcomes, e.g. cancer and heart disease, may have overestimated the negative effects of a high-fat diet. If we were able to correctly assess dietary fat intake in general populations, recommendations for fat intake may be more liberal than the 30% suggested today. Improved assessment of fat intake in epidemiological studies is necessary for future development of evidence-based recommendations for diet and health .
PubMed ID
16372929 View in PubMed
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Changes in seasonal mortalities with improvement in home heating in England and Wales from 1964 to 1984.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67955
Source
Int J Biometeorol. 1989 Jun;33(2):71-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1989
Author
W R Keatinge
S R Coleshaw
J. Holmes
Source
Int J Biometeorol. 1989 Jun;33(2):71-6
Date
Jun-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Automobiles
Cold Climate - adverse effects
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage - adverse effects
England
Heating
Humans
Mortality
Prescriptions, Drug
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seasons
Smoking - adverse effects
Time Factors
Wales
Abstract
Changes in summer (July-September) and winter (January-March) mortalities of people aged 70-74 in England and Wales from 1964 to 1984 were compared with possible causal factors. Summer mortalities were little affected by annual temperature or influenza epidemics and fell from 1972-1975 for all causes, coronary and respiratory causes, while cerebrovascular mortality fell more rapidly from that time. Cigarette consumption also fell from 1972-1975; falling consumptions of total fat from 1970 and saturated fat from 1972-1975 probably also contributed to the fall in arterial deaths, and likewise falls in prescription rates for tranquillisers and sedatives from 1976-1978 to the fall in respiratory deaths. From 1964 to 1984 use of central heating increased from 13% to 69% of households, domestic fuel consumption increased, and excess mortality in winter from respiratory disease declined by 69%, even relative to summer mortality and when adjusted for varying coldness of winters. The improvement was partly explained by a decline in influenza epidemics. By contrast, excess mortalities in winter from coronary and cerebrovascular disease, although rising in some early influenza epidemics, did not fall significantly as home heating improved. These thrombotic deaths together accounted for 56% of the total excess winter mortality by 1984. The findings support other indications that most of the excess mortality from arterial thrombosis in winter in England and Wales is due to brief excursions outdoors rather than to low indoor temperatures.
PubMed ID
2759722 View in PubMed
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Consumption of added fats and oils in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) centres across 10 European countries as assessed by 24-hour dietary recalls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18552
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1227-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
J. Linseisen
E. Bergström
L. Gafá
C A González
A. Thiébaut
A. Trichopoulou
R. Tumino
C. Navarro Sánchez
C. Martínez Garcia
I. Mattisson
S. Nilsson
A. Welch
E A Spencer
K. Overvad
A. Tjønneland
F. Clavel-Chapelon
E. Kesse
A B Miller
M. Schulz
K. Botsi
A. Naska
S. Sieri
C. Sacerdote
M C Ocké
P H M Peeters
G. Skeie
D. Engeset
U R Charrondière
N. Slimani
Author Affiliation
Unit of Human Nutrition and Cancer Prevention, Technical University of Munich, Alte Akademie 16, D-85350 Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany. j.linseisen@wzw.tum.de
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1227-42
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Diet Surveys
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Educational Status
Energy intake
Europe
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - etiology
Population Surveillance - methods
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the consumption of added fats and oils across the European centres and countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). DESIGN AND SETTING: 24-Hour dietary recalls were collected by means of standardised computer-guided interviews in 27 redefined EPIC centres across 10 European countries. SUBJECTS: From an initial number of 36 900 subjects, single dietary recalls from 22 924 women and 13 031 men in the age range of 35-74 years were included. RESULTS: Mean daily intake of added fats and oils varied between 16.2 g (Varese, Italy) and 41.1 g (Malmö, Sweden) in women and between 24.7 g (Ragusa, Italy) and 66.0 g (Potsdam, Germany) in men. Total mean lipid intake by consumption of added fats and oils, including those used for sauce preparation, ranged between 18.3 (Norway) and 37.2 g day-1 (Greece) in women and 28.4 (Heidelberg, Germany) and 51.2 g day-1 (Greece) in men. The Mediterranean EPIC centres with high olive oil consumption combined with low animal fat intake contrasted with the central and northern European centres where fewer vegetable oils, more animal fats and a high proportion of margarine were consumed. The consumption of added fats and oils of animal origin was highest in the German EPIC centres, followed by the French. The contribution of added fats and oils to total energy intake ranged from 8% in Norway to 22% in Greece. CONCLUSIONS: The results demonstrate a high variation in dietary intake of added fats and oils in EPIC, providing a good opportunity to elucidate the role of dietary fats in cancer aetiology.
PubMed ID
12639229 View in PubMed
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Consumption of key food items is associated with excess weight among elementary-school-aged children in a Canadian first nations community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159057
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2008 Feb;108(2):362-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Olivier Receveur
Karimou Morou
Katherine Gray-Donald
Ann C Macaulay
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Olivier.receveur@umontreal.ca
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2008 Feb;108(2):362-6
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Body mass index
Child
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Diet - standards
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Energy Intake - physiology
Female
Food Habits
Food Preferences
Humans
Male
Nutrition Surveys
Obesity - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk factors
Abstract
The present analyses aim to identify differences in selected dimensions of diet quality and quantity across body mass index (BMI) categories for Mohawk children in grades 4 through 6 so as to enhance ongoing community intervention strategies within the Kahnawake School Diabetes Prevention Project (KSDPP). Using 24-hour recalls (n=444), no observable differences in energy intake, percent fat, energy density, or diet diversity across BMI categories were observed. Using a new method, we compared the frequency of use and the amounts consumed for only the most-frequently consumed food items across BMI categories. Compared to normal-weight children, and after adjusting for age, children "at risk of overweight" consume potato chips more frequently (P=0.017) and crackers less frequently (P=0.153), while overweight children consumed larger portions of french fries (P=0.027). We conclude that, in this group of children, consuming slightly more french fries or potato chips than what is already consumed by normal-weight children appears to compromise diet quality as far as overweight is concerned.
PubMed ID
18237583 View in PubMed
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Dairy consumption and risk of stroke in Swedish women and men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125085
Source
Stroke. 2012 Jul;43(7):1775-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Susanna C Larsson
Jarmo Virtamo
Alicja Wolk
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden. susanna.larsson@ki.se
Source
Stroke. 2012 Jul;43(7):1775-80
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Dairy Products - adverse effects
Diet, High-Fat - adverse effects
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Stroke - diet therapy - epidemiology - prevention & control
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Epidemiological studies of the associations of low-fat dairy and specific dairy food consumption with risk of stroke are sparse. Our aim was to examine the association between consumption of total, low-fat, full-fat, and specific dairy foods and risk of stroke in a prospective cohort study.
We followed 74,961 Swedish women and men who were free from cardiovascular disease and cancer and who completed a 96-item food frequency questionnaire in 1997. Incident cases of stroke were ascertained from the Swedish Hospital Discharge Registry.
During a mean follow-up of 10.2 years, we ascertained 4089 cases of stroke, including 3159 cerebral infarctions, 583 hemorrhagic strokes, and 347 unspecified strokes. Consumption of low-fat dairy foods was inversely associated with risk of total stroke (P for trend=0.03) and cerebral infarction (P for trend=0.03). The multivariable relative risks for the highest compared with the lowest quintile of low-fat dairy consumption were 0.88 (95% CI, 0.80-0.97) for total stroke and 0.87 (95% CI, 0.78-0.98) for cerebral infarction. Consumption of total dairy, full-fat dairy, milk, sour milk/yogurt, cheese, and cream/crème fraiche was not associated with stroke risk.
These results suggest that low-fat dairy consumption is inversely associated with the risk of stroke.
PubMed ID
22517598 View in PubMed
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[Dairy products and obesity: pro and contra, Russian experience].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299455
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2018; 87(4):39-47
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2018
Author
A N Martinchik
E E Keshabyants
E V Peskova
N A Mikhaylov
A K Baturin
Author Affiliation
Federal Research Centre of Nutrition, Biotechnology and Food Safety, Moscow.
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2018; 87(4):39-47
Date
2018
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Body mass index
Dairy Products
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Energy intake
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Biological
Obesity - epidemiology - metabolism
Russia - epidemiology
Waist Circumference
Abstract
The aim of the work was to study the association of overweight and obesity with the consumption of basic types of dairy products among the adult population of Russia. Data from the survey of the diet of adult members of 45,000 households, conducted in 2013 by the Federal Service of State Statistics in all regions of the country, have been used. The actual consumption of food among all members of the surveyed households was studied by 24-hour (daily) diet recall in April and September 2013. The body mass index was calculated on the basis of self-esteem by respondents of body weight and height. It was shown that average daily intake of kefir, yogurt and cottage cheese was higher in women, while consumption of drinking milk and cheeses was higher for men. Consumption of drinking milk and kefir in men and women was much higher in groups with overweight and obesity than with normal body weight. Consumption of yogurt, on the contrary, was much less in people of both sexes with overweight and obesity. Consumption of milk, kefir and cottage cheese increased with age, while consumption of yogurt and cheeses, on the contrary, decreased with age. The data of the variation statistics indicated the existence of a relationship between obesity and consumption of individual dairy products. However, the dependence of these same parameters on age reduced the reliability and evidentiary strength of the results of the variation analysis, since the prevalence of obesity increases significantly with age. To study the association of dairy consumption and the spread of obesity, a logistic regression model was used with the calculation of the odd ratio of the risk of obesity in the consumption of dairy products with adjustment for age, education level and per capita family income. The results of the association analysis, with adjustment for socio-demographic variables, unambiguously showed a significant reduction in the risk of obesity in persons of both sexes consuming yoghurt (OR mean 0.76; CI 0.71; 0.82; ?
PubMed ID
30570956 View in PubMed
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[Denmark is the first county in the world to forbid the use of industrially produced fatty acids]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53416
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2004 Jan 5;166(1-2):29-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-5-2004

54 records – page 1 of 6.