Skip header and navigation

Refine By

943 records – page 1 of 95.

Absence of cardiovascular benefits and sportfish consumption among St. Lawrence River anglers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182864
Source
Environ Res. 2003 Nov;93(3):241-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
Catherine Godin
Bryna Shatenstein
Gilles Paradis
Tom Kosatsky
Author Affiliation
Département de Médecine Sociale et préventive, Faculté de Médecine, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. catherine.godin@bigfoot.com
Source
Environ Res. 2003 Nov;93(3):241-7
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Blood pressure
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Diet
Dietary Fats
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - pharmacology
Fisheries
Fishes
Humans
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Seasons
Abstract
The benefits of sportfish consumption and omega-3 fatty acid (omega3-FA) intake for cardiovascular risk factors were evaluated in a sample of 112 male fishers from the St. Lawrence River in the Montreal area during the 1996 winter and fall fishing seasons. A questionnaire on fishing practices and fish consumption was administered, and fasting blood samples were collected for lipid and phospholipid determination. Linear regression analyses, which considered the confounding effect of major risk factors, did not show any significant association between measured omega3-FAs or reported fish intake and blood lipids or blood pressure. This study is limited by its low statistical power due to the small sample size and the possibility that the fish eaten by the participants were low in omega3-FAs or that the participants diets contained foods high in cholesterol-raising fat.
PubMed ID
14615233 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abundance of the Na-K-2Cl cotransporter NKCC2 is increased by high-fat feeding in Fischer 344 X Brown Norway (F1) rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90141
Source
Am J Physiol Renal Physiol. 2009 Apr;296(4):F762-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Riazi Shahla
Tiwari Swasti
Sharma Nikhil
Rash Arjun
Ecelbarger C M
Author Affiliation
Associate Professor, Dept. of Medicine, Georgetown Univ., 4000 Reservoir Rd, NW, Washington, DC, 20007, USA.
Source
Am J Physiol Renal Physiol. 2009 Apr;296(4):F762-70
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antioxidants - pharmacology
Biological Markers - urine
Blood pressure
Blotting, Western
Crosses, Genetic
Cyclic N-Oxides - pharmacology
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage - metabolism
Dinoprost - analogs & derivatives - urine
Enzyme Inhibitors - pharmacology
Furosemide - pharmacology
Glucose Intolerance - metabolism - physiopathology
Hypertension - metabolism - physiopathology
Insulin Resistance
Kidney Medulla - drug effects - metabolism
Male
NG-Nitroarginine Methyl Ester - pharmacology
Natriuresis
Nitric Oxide - urine
Nitric Oxide Synthase - antagonists & inhibitors - metabolism
Oxidative Stress
Potassium Channels, Inwardly Rectifying - metabolism
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred F344
Sodium Potassium Chloride Symporter Inhibitors - pharmacology
Sodium-Potassium-Chloride Symporters - antagonists & inhibitors - metabolism
Sodium-Potassium-Exchanging ATPase - metabolism
Spin Labels
Telemetry
Time Factors
Up-Regulation
Abstract
Insulin resistance is associated with hypertension by mechanisms likely involving the kidney. To determine how the major apical sodium transporter of the thick ascending limb, the bumetanide-sensitive Na-K-2Cl cotransporter (NKCC2) is regulated by high-fat feeding, we treated young male, Fischer 344 X Brown Norway (F344BN) rats for 8 wk with diets containing either normal (NF, 4%) or high (HF, 36%) fat, by weight, primarily as lard. HF-fed rats had impaired glucose tolerance, increased urine excretion of 8-isoprostane (a marker of oxidative stress), increased protein levels for NKCC2 (50-125%) and the renal outer medullary potassium channel (106%), as well as increased natriuretic response to furosemide (20-40%). To test the role of oxidative stress in this response, in study 2, rats were fed the NF or HF diet plus plain drinking water, or water containing N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME), a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (100 mg/l), or tempol, a superoxide dismutase mimetic (1 mmol/l). The combination of tempol with HF nullified the increase in medullary NKCC2, while l-NAME with HF led to the highest expression of medullary NKCC2 (to 498% of NF mean). However, neither of these drugs dramatically affected the elevated natriuretic response to furosemide with HF. Finally, l-NAME led to a marked increase in blood pressure (measured by radiotelemetry), which was significantly enhanced with HF. Mean arterial blood pressure at 7 wk was as follows (mmHg): NF, 100 +/- 2; NF plus l-NAME, 122 +/- 3; and HF plus l-NAME, 131 +/- 2. Overall, HF feeding increased the abundance of NKCC2. Inappropriately high sodium reabsorption in the thick ascending limb via NKCC2 may contribute to hypertension with insulin resistance.
PubMed ID
19193725 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acne and dairy products in adolescence: results from a Norwegian longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286570
Source
J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2017 Mar;31(3):530-535
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
M. Ulvestad
E. Bjertness
F. Dalgard
J A Halvorsen
Source
J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2017 Mar;31(3):530-535
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acne Vulgaris - epidemiology
Adolescent
Animals
Dairy Products
Diet
Dietary Fats - analysis
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Milk - chemistry
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Self Report
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Acne is a very common skin condition, and it is of great interest to elucidate lifestyle factors that may contribute to its occurrence. In the last decade, the acne-diet connection has been brought back to credibility.
To examine whether high intakes of dairy products in early adolescence is associated with moderate to severe acne in later adolescence.
The study is a longitudinal, questionnaire-based population study of Norwegian adolescents. Students attending the 10th grade (15-16 years old) of compulsory schooling in Oslo in 2000-2001 and the 13th grade (18-19 years old) 3 years later, in 2004, were invited. Dairy product consumption was self-reported at age 15-16 and acne severity was self-assessed and reported at age 18-19.
The overall prevalence of moderate to severe acne was 13.9%. High intakes (=2 glasses per day) of full-fat dairy products were associated with moderate to severe acne. In boys with exclusively high intakes of full-fat dairy products, the odds ratio for acne was 4.81 (1.59-14.56). A high total intake of dairy products was associated with acne in girls (OR 1.80, 1.02-3.16). No significant associations were found between acne and intake of semi-skimmed or skimmed dairy products, and not with moderate intakes of any fat variety of dairy products.
This study shows association between high intakes of dairy products and acne in adolescence. Our findings support a hypothesis suggesting that dairy consumption may be a factor contributing to acne. The study is based on multiple hypothesis testing, and the methodological limitations must be considered when interpreting the results.
PubMed ID
27422392 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acquired preference especially for dietary fat and obesity: a study of weight-discordant monozygotic twin pairs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189641
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2002 Jul;26(7):973-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2002
Author
A. Rissanen
P. Hakala
L. Lissner
C-E Mattlar
M. Koskenvuo
T. Rönnemaa
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2002 Jul;26(7):973-7
Date
Jul-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Weight
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Female
Finland
Food Habits
Food Preferences
Humans
Male
Obesity - epidemiology - psychology
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
To determine the independent associations of dietary preference for fat with obesity without the confounding by genetic effects.
Descriptive comparison of the responses of monozygotic twins discordant for obesity to questions concerning current and past preference for dietary fat, current overconsumption of fatty items and recalled food consumption compared to the co-twin.
The Research and Development Centre of the Social Insurance Institution, Finland.
Twenty-three healthy monozygotic twin pairs who were discordant for obesity (BMI difference at least 3 kg/m(2)).
Obesity status of the twin, as a function of the current and recalled dietary preferences and selected psychosocial variables.
The obese twins reported current preference for fatty foods three times more frequently than the lean co-twin. Moreover, when comparing recalled taste for fat at the time the twins left their parental homes, both the obese and lean co-twins consistently recalled that the obese twin had greater preference for fatty foods in young adulthood, and that the lean twin had less. Psychological characteristics of lean and obese co-twins did not differ.
Acquired preference for fatty foods is associated with obesity, independent of genetic background. Modification of fat preferences may be an important step in the prevention of obesity in the general population.
PubMed ID
12080452 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute myocardial infarction--progress in primary prevention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature109197
Source
Br Heart J. 1971;33:Suppl:145-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
1971
Author
J. Stamler
Source
Br Heart J. 1971;33:Suppl:145-64
Date
1971
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Arteriosclerosis - etiology
Asia
Cholesterol - blood
Coronary Disease - etiology - prevention & control
Death, Sudden
Diet, Atherogenic
Dietary Fats
Electrocardiography
Europe
Finland
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Hypertension - complications
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - mortality - prevention & control
Obesity - complications
Physical Exertion
Rabbits
Smoking - complications - prevention & control
United States
Notes
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1968 Apr;21(4):255-765652949
Cites: Bull N Y Acad Med. 1968 Aug;44(8):936-495243889
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 1969 Nov;24(5):659-655347939
Cites: Bull N Y Acad Med. 1969 Dec;45(12):1306-255261246
Cites: Lancet. 1970 Feb 28;1(7644):473-44189785
Cites: J Clin Invest. 1970 May;49(5):1007-155441536
Cites: Circ Res. 1970 Jul;27(1):59-674987450
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1962 May;109:566-7214452187
Cites: Circulation. 1963 Jul;28:20-3113941964
Cites: Arch Pathol. 1963 Oct;76:404-1214054162
Cites: J Chronic Dis. 1964 Oct;17:933-4914213425
Cites: Lancet. 1960 Jan 23;1(7117):196-813839984
PubMed ID
4929436 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acyl pattern of adipose tissue triglycerides, plasma free fatty acids, and diet of a group of men participating in a primary coronary prevention program (the Oslo Study).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55772
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 1983 Dec;38(6):906-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1983
Author
B K Jacobsen
K. Trygg
I. Hjermann
M S Thomassen
C. Real
K R Norum
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 1983 Dec;38(6):906-13
Date
Dec-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - analysis
Adult
Cholesterol - blood
Coronary Disease - prevention & control
Dietary Fats - therapeutic use
Fatty Acids, Nonesterified - analysis
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Triglycerides - analysis
Abstract
The acyl pattern of adipose tissue triglycerides and of plasma free fatty acids were determined after 7 yr of diet intervention on elevated plasma cholesterol in 42 men taking part in the smoking-lipid trial of the Oslo Study. Twenty-two of the men were advised to change dietary habits (mainly reduce saturated fat) whereas the remaining 20 were controls. The adipose tissue from men in the intervention group contained relatively more linoleic and linolenic acids and relatively less saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids compared to men in the control group. There were strong correlations between the relative content of several fatty acids in adipose tissue triglycerides and plasma free fatty acid. Furthermore, there was a close correlation between the intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids found in a dietary survey done 2 to 3 yr before this study and the relative content of polyunsaturated fatty acids in adipose tissue.
PubMed ID
6650449 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Adequacy of the diet served to Tarahumara children in indigenous boarding schools of northern Mexico].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143615
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2010 Jan-Feb;52(1):23-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Joel Monárrez-Espino
Graciela Ivette Béjar-Lío
Guillermo Vázquez-Mendoza
Author Affiliation
Unidad de Investigación en Epidemiología Clínica, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Chihuahua, México.
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2010 Jan-Feb;52(1):23-9
Language
Spanish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Diet
Dietary Carbohydrates - analysis
Dietary Fats - analysis
Dietary Proteins - analysis
Energy intake
Female
Food Services
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Menu Planning
Mexico
Micronutrients - analysis
Nutrition Policy
Nutritional Requirements
Residential Facilities
Schools
Abstract
To assess the adequacy and variability of the diet served to Tarahumara children in indigenous boarding schools.
Records of food and drinks served for meals, weighed daily, were obtained from Monday through Friday for 10 consecutive weeks in two selected boarding schools. Nutrient intake for Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays was calculated and analyzed for weeks 3, 5 and 7.
The number of food items used per week ranged from 33 to 46. The most frequently utilized items were cooking oil, fortified corn tortilla, milk, onion, sugar and beans. Total energy served per day fluctuated between 1309 and 2919 Kcal; proteins comprised 10.5 to 21.2% (45 to 127 g/day), carbohydrates 40.7 to 61.9% (145 to 433 g/day), and lipids 22.5 to 48.1% (45 to 125 g/day) of the total. Daily micronutrient content ranges were: iron 15-33 mg, calcium 686-1795 mg, zinc 8-19 mg, vitamin A 118-756 mcg, vitamin B(9) 42-212 mcg, and vitamin B(12) 0.8-5 mcg.
There was significant daily variability in the diet, which was hypercaloric due to the high lipid content, and yet insufficient in vitamins B(9), B(12) and A.
PubMed ID
20464250 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adherence to dietary recommendations for Swedish adults across categories of greenhouse gas emissions from food.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293496
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 Dec; 20(18):3381-3393
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Camilla Sjörs
Fredrik Hedenus
Arvid Sjölander
Annika Tillander
Katarina Bälter
Author Affiliation
1Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics (MEB),Karolinska Institutet,Nobels väg 12a,SE-171 77 Stockholm,Sweden.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 Dec; 20(18):3381-3393
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Carbon Dioxide - analysis
Diet
Diet Records
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Exercise
Female
Greenhouse Gases - analysis
Humans
Male
Micronutrients - administration & dosage
Middle Aged
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Surveys
Patient compliance
Recommended dietary allowances
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
To explore associations between diet-related greenhouse gas emissions (GHGE), nutrient intakes and adherence to the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations among Swedish adults.
Diet was assessed by 4d food records in the Swedish National Dietary Survey. GHGE was estimated by linking all foods to carbon dioxide equivalents, using data from life cycle assessment studies. Participants were categorized into quartiles of energy-adjusted GHGE and differences between GHGE groups regarding nutrient intakes and adherence to nutrient recommendations were explored.
Sweden.
Women (n 840) and men (n 627) aged 18-80 years.
Differences in nutrient intakes and adherence to nutrient recommendations between GHGE groups were generally small. The dietary intake of participants with the lowest emissions was more in line with recommendations regarding protein, carbohydrates, dietary fibre and vitamin D, but further from recommendations regarding added sugar, compared with the highest GHGE group. The overall adherence to recommendations was found to be better among participants with lower emissions compared with higher emissions. Among women, 27 % in the lowest GHGE group adhered to at least twenty-three recommendations compared with only 12 % in the highest emission group. For men, the corresponding figures were 17 and 10 %, respectively.
The study compared nutrient intakes as well as adherence to dietary recommendations for diets with different levels of GHGE from a national dietary survey. We found that participants with low-emission diets, despite higher intake of added sugar, adhered to a larger number of dietary recommendations than those with high emissions.
PubMed ID
28879831 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adipose tissue fatty acids and insulin sensitivity in elderly men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98176
Source
Diabetologia. 2010 May;53(5):850-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
D. Iggman
J. Arnlöv
B. Vessby
T. Cederholm
P. Sjögren
U. Risérus
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Diabetologia. 2010 May;53(5):850-7
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - chemistry
Aged
Chromatography, Gas
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - etiology
Dietary Fats - adverse effects
Docosahexaenoic Acids - analysis
Eicosapentaenoic Acid - analysis
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - analysis
Glucose Clamp Technique
Health Surveys
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Palmitic Acid - analysis
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Sweden
Abstract
AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Dietary fatty acids may affect insulin sensitivity. Adipose tissue fatty acid composition partly reflects long-term dietary intake, but data from large studies regarding relationships with insulin sensitivity are lacking. We aimed to determine the association between adipose tissue fatty acids and insulin sensitivity in elderly Swedish men. METHODS: In a cross-sectional analysis of the community-based Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (n = 795, mean age 71 years), adipose tissue biopsies were obtained and fatty acid composition was determined by gas-liquid chromatography. Insulin sensitivity was measured directly by a euglycaemic clamp. RESULTS: Palmitic acid (16:0), the major saturated fatty acid (SFA) in the diet and in adipose tissue, was negatively correlated with insulin sensitivity (r = -0.14), as were 16:1 n-7 (r = -0.15), 20:3 n-6 (r = -0.31), 20:4 n-6 (r = -0.38), 22:4 n-6 (r = -0.37) and 22:5 n-3 (r = -0.24; p
Notes
RefSource: Diabetologia. 2010 May;53(5):799-801
PubMed ID
20127308 View in PubMed
Less detail

943 records – page 1 of 95.