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273 records – page 1 of 28.

44-year dental health survey of Helsinki schoolchildren.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246141
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1980 Feb;8(1):66-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1980
Author
I. Rytömaa
V. Järvinen
P E Calonius
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1980 Feb;8(1):66-7
Date
Feb-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
DMF Index
Dental Caries - prevention & control
Dental Health Surveys
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Female
Finland
Health Education, Dental
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Sucrose - administration & dosage
War
Abstract
The purpose of the present study was to establish whether the number of intact teeth in Helsinki schoolchildren aged 7-13 years was rationally correlated with the wartime reduction in sugar consumption and, later, with dental health education programs in Finland. The period covered is 44 years. The results show that dental health education is effective in caries prevention and that enforced programs can lead to an improvement similar to that seen during the war.
PubMed ID
6929245 View in PubMed
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Adherence to dietary recommendations for Swedish adults across categories of greenhouse gas emissions from food.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293496
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 Dec; 20(18):3381-3393
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Camilla Sjörs
Fredrik Hedenus
Arvid Sjölander
Annika Tillander
Katarina Bälter
Author Affiliation
1Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics (MEB),Karolinska Institutet,Nobels väg 12a,SE-171 77 Stockholm,Sweden.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 Dec; 20(18):3381-3393
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Carbon Dioxide - analysis
Diet
Diet Records
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Exercise
Female
Greenhouse Gases - analysis
Humans
Male
Micronutrients - administration & dosage
Middle Aged
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Surveys
Patient compliance
Recommended dietary allowances
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
To explore associations between diet-related greenhouse gas emissions (GHGE), nutrient intakes and adherence to the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations among Swedish adults.
Diet was assessed by 4d food records in the Swedish National Dietary Survey. GHGE was estimated by linking all foods to carbon dioxide equivalents, using data from life cycle assessment studies. Participants were categorized into quartiles of energy-adjusted GHGE and differences between GHGE groups regarding nutrient intakes and adherence to nutrient recommendations were explored.
Sweden.
Women (n 840) and men (n 627) aged 18-80 years.
Differences in nutrient intakes and adherence to nutrient recommendations between GHGE groups were generally small. The dietary intake of participants with the lowest emissions was more in line with recommendations regarding protein, carbohydrates, dietary fibre and vitamin D, but further from recommendations regarding added sugar, compared with the highest GHGE group. The overall adherence to recommendations was found to be better among participants with lower emissions compared with higher emissions. Among women, 27 % in the lowest GHGE group adhered to at least twenty-three recommendations compared with only 12 % in the highest emission group. For men, the corresponding figures were 17 and 10 %, respectively.
The study compared nutrient intakes as well as adherence to dietary recommendations for diets with different levels of GHGE from a national dietary survey. We found that participants with low-emission diets, despite higher intake of added sugar, adhered to a larger number of dietary recommendations than those with high emissions.
PubMed ID
28879831 View in PubMed
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Adherence to the enhanced recovery after surgery protocol and outcomes after colorectal cancer surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137832
Source
Arch Surg. 2011 May;146(5):571-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Ulf O Gustafsson
Jonatan Hausel
Anders Thorell
Olle Ljungqvist
Mattias Soop
Jonas Nygren
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Ersta Hospital, 116 91 Stockholm, Sweden. ulf.gustafsson@erstadiakoni.se
Source
Arch Surg. 2011 May;146(5):571-7
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Beverages
Cohort Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms - rehabilitation - surgery
Critical Pathways - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Early Ambulation - statistics & numerical data
Female
Fluid Therapy - statistics & numerical data
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Laparoscopy - statistics & numerical data
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Perioperative Care - statistics & numerical data
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Sweden
Abstract
To study the impact of different adherence levels to the enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) protocol and the effect of various ERAS elements on outcomes following major surgery.
Single-center prospective cohort study before and after reinforcement of an ERAS protocol. Comparisons were made both between and across periods using multivariate logistic regression. All clinical data (114 variables) were prospectively recorded.
Ersta Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Nine hundred fifty-three consecutive patients with colorectal cancer: 464 patients treated in 2002 to 2004 and 489 in 2005 to 2007.
The association between improved adherence to the ERAS protocol and the incidence of postoperative symptoms, complications, and length of stay following major colorectal cancer surgery was analyzed.
Following an overall increase in preoperative and perioperative adherence to the ERAS protocol from 43.3% in 2002 to 2004 to 70.6% in 2005 to 2007, both postoperative complications (odds ratio, 0.73; 95% confidence interval, 0.55-0.98) and symptoms (odds ratio, 0.53; 95% confidence interval, 0.40-0.70) declined significantly. Restriction of intravenous fluid and use of a preoperative carbohydrate drink were major independent predictors. Across periods, the proportion of adverse postoperative outcomes (30-day morbidity, symptoms, and readmissions) was significantly reduced with increasing adherence to the ERAS protocol (>70%, >80%, and >90%) compared with low ERAS adherence (
Notes
Comment In: Arch Surg. 2011 May;146(5):577-821739654
PubMed ID
21242424 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' low-carbohydrate-density diets are related to poorer dietary intakes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172239
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2005 Nov;105(11):1783-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
Linda S Greene-Finestone
M Karen Campbell
Susan E Evers
Iris A Gutmanis
Author Affiliation
Office of Nutrition Policy and Promotion, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Linda_Greene-Finestone@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2005 Nov;105(11):1783-8
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adolescent Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Child
Cluster analysis
Confidence Intervals
Diet - standards
Diet, Carbohydrate-Restricted - standards
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Exercise - physiology
Female
Health Behavior
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Micronutrients - administration & dosage
Nutritive Value
Obesity
Odds Ratio
Ontario
Questionnaires
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
This study was undertaken to assess how low-carbohydrate-density diets below the acceptable macronutrient distribution range relate to food and micronutrient intake and sociodemographic and health-related characteristics. The multistage stratified cluster design in the 1990 Ontario Health Survey was used. There were 5,194 subjects, 12 to 18 years of age, in sampled households. Dietary data were collected via a food frequency questionnaire. Low-carbohydrate-density diets were consumed by 27.6% of males and 24.1% of females. Low-carbohydrate-density diets were related (P
PubMed ID
16256764 View in PubMed
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Alterations in rat bone composition related to polyol supplementation of the diet.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12340
Source
Bone Miner. 1989 Apr;6(1):25-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1989
Author
M. Knuuttila
M. Svanberg
M. Hämäläinen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Bone Miner. 1989 Apr;6(1):25-31
Date
Apr-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bone and Bones - analysis - metabolism
Calcium - analysis - metabolism
Citrates - analysis - metabolism
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage - metabolism
Food, Fortified
Male
Polymers - administration & dosage - metabolism
Rats
Rats, Inbred Strains
Sorbitol - administration & dosage - metabolism
Xylitol - administration & dosage - metabolism
Abstract
The effect of dietary supplements of xylitol, sorbitol and glucose on bone composition was studied in rats. The supplementation, expressed as a % of the dry diet, was gradually increased up to 20% over 3 weeks and continued for 5 weeks. The control group was fed a stock diet only. Each group consisted of nine rats aged 12 weeks at the beginning of the experiment. Ca, Mg, P, CO3 and citrate were analysed from the femur and Ca and citrate also from the serum and urine. The results showed that xylitol supplementation significantly increased the concentrations of Ca and citrate in bone (P less than 0.001) and sorbitol that of Ca only, whereas glucose slightly reduced both CO3 and citrate. The citrate concentration was found to correlate significantly with Ca and P (P less than 0.001), and also with Mg (P less than 0.002). Both xylitol and sorbitol increased serum Ca and the urinary excretion of Ca and citrate. In conclusion, high xylitol or sorbitol supplementation affects Ca and citrate metabolism. The results suggest a connection between citrate and Ca in bone.
PubMed ID
2752208 View in PubMed
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Altering source or amount of dietary carbohydrate has acute and chronic effects on postprandial glucose and triglycerides in type 2 diabetes: Canadian trial of Carbohydrates in Diabetes (CCD).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126372
Source
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2013 Mar;23(3):227-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
T M S Wolever
A L Gibbs
J-L Chiasson
P W Connelly
R G Josse
L A Leiter
P. Maheux
R. Rabasa-Lhoret
N W Rodger
E A Ryan
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. thomas.wolever@utoronto.ca
Source
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2013 Mar;23(3):227-34
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Blood Glucose - analysis
Canada
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diet therapy
Diet
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Fatty Acids, Monounsaturated - blood
Female
Glycemic Index
Humans
Insulin - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Postprandial Period
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
Nutrition recommendations for type 2 diabetes (T2DM) are partly guided by the postprandial responses elicited by diets varying in carbohydrate (CHO). We aimed to explore whether long-term changes in postprandial responses on low-glycemic-index (GI) or low-CHO diets were due to acute or chronic effects in T2DM.
Subjects with diet-alone-treated T2DM were randomly assigned to high-CHO/high-GI (H), high-CHO/low-GI (L), or low-CHO/high-monounsaturated-fat (M) diets for 12-months. At week-0 (Baseline) postprandial responses after H-meals (55% CHO, GI = 61) were measured from 0800 h to 1600 h. After 12 mo subjects were randomly assigned to H-meals or study diet meals (L, 57% CHO, GI = 50; M, 44% CHO, GI = 61). This yielded 5 groups: H diet with H-meals (HH, n = 34); L diet with H- (LH, n = 17) or L-meals (LL, n = 16); and M diet with H- (MH, n = 18) or M meals (MM, n = 19). Postprandial glucose fluctuations were lower in LL than all other groups (p
PubMed ID
22397878 View in PubMed
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Analysis of 24-hour recalls of 164 fourth- to sixth-grade Mohawk children in Kahnawake.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205123
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 1998 Jul;98(7):814-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1998

[A scientific evaluation of the "alternative" food pyramid]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47077
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2005 Feb 21;167(8):927-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-21-2005

273 records – page 1 of 28.