Skip header and navigation

Refine By

353 records – page 1 of 36.

Accuracy of self-reported intake of signature foods in a school meal intervention study: comparison between control and intervention period.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267753
Source
Br J Nutr. 2015 Aug 28;114(4):635-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-28-2015
Author
Anja Biltoft-Jensen
Camilla Trab Damsgaard
Rikke Andersen
Karin Hess Ygil
Elisabeth Wreford Andersen
Majken Ege
Tue Christensen
Louise Bergmann Sørensen
Ken D Stark
Inge Tetens
Anne-Vibeke Thorsen
Source
Br J Nutr. 2015 Aug 28;114(4):635-44
Date
Aug-28-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bias (epidemiology)
Child
Denmark
Diet
Diet Records
Female
Food Services
Humans
Intervention Studies
Lunch
Male
Schools
Self Report
Abstract
Bias in self-reported dietary intake is important when evaluating the effect of dietary interventions, particularly for intervention foods. However, few have investigated this in children, and none have investigated the reporting accuracy of fish intake in children using biomarkers. In a Danish school meal study, 8- to 11-year-old children (n 834) were served the New Nordic Diet (NND) for lunch. The present study examined the accuracy of self-reported intake of signature foods (berries, cabbage, root vegetables, legumes, herbs, potatoes, wild plants, mushrooms, nuts and fish) characterising the NND. Children, assisted by parents, self-reported their diet in a Web-based Dietary Assessment Software for Children during the intervention and control (packed lunch) periods. The reported fish intake by children was compared with their ranking according to fasting whole-blood EPA and DHA concentration and weight percentage using the Spearman correlations and cross-classification. Direct observation of school lunch intake (n 193) was used to score the accuracy of food-reporting as matches, intrusions, omissions and faults. The reporting of all lunch foods had higher percentage of matches compared with the reporting of signature foods in both periods, and the accuracy was higher during the control period compared with the intervention period. Both Spearman's rank correlations and linear mixed models demonstrated positive associations between EPA+DHA and reported fish intake. The direct observations showed that both reported and real intake of signature foods did increase during the intervention period. In conclusion, the self-reported data represented a true increase in the intake of signature foods and can be used to examine dietary intervention effects.
PubMed ID
26189886 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acquired obesity is associated with changes in the serum lipidomic profile independent of genetic effects--a monozygotic twin study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165168
Source
PLoS One. 2007;2(2):e218
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Kirsi H Pietiläinen
Marko Sysi-Aho
Aila Rissanen
Tuulikki Seppänen-Laakso
Hannele Yki-Järvinen
Jaakko Kaprio
Matej Oresic
Author Affiliation
Obesity Research Unit, Department of Psychiatry, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
PLoS One. 2007;2(2):e218
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Fat - pathology
Adult
Body Composition
Body mass index
Diet Records
Female
Finland
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Lipids - blood
Lysophosphatidylcholines - blood
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Metabolomics
Obesity - blood - epidemiology - genetics - pathology
Smoking - epidemiology
Sphingomyelins - blood
Subcutaneous Fat - pathology
Twins, Monozygotic - genetics
Young Adult
Abstract
Both genetic and environmental factors are involved in the etiology of obesity and the associated lipid disturbances. We determined whether acquired obesity is associated with changes in global serum lipid profiles independent of genetic factors in young adult monozygotic (MZ) twins. 14 healthy MZ pairs discordant for obesity (10 to 25 kg weight difference) and ten weight concordant control pairs aged 24-27 years were identified from a large population-based study. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by the euglycemic clamp technique, and body composition by DEXA (% body fat) and by MRI (subcutaneous and intra-abdominal fat). Global characterization of lipid molecular species in serum was performed by a lipidomics strategy using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Obesity, independent of genetic influences, was primarily related to increases in lysophosphatidylcholines, lipids found in proinflammatory and proatherogenic conditions and to decreases in ether phospholipids, which are known to have antioxidant properties. These lipid changes were associated with insulin resistance, a pathogonomic characteristic of acquired obesity in these young adult twins. Our results show that obesity, already in its early stages and independent of genetic influences, is associated with deleterious alterations in the lipid metabolism known to facilitate atherogenesis, inflammation and insulin resistance.
Notes
Cites: Cell. 1992 Mar 6;68(5):879-871312391
Cites: J Immunol. 2005 Mar 1;174(5):2981-915728511
Cites: Biochem J. 1992 Oct 1;287 ( Pt 1):237-401417777
Cites: J Stud Alcohol. 1994 Mar;55(2):149-588189735
Cites: Diabetes. 1994 Jul;43(7):915-98013757
Cites: Lipids. 1995 Jan;30(1):1-147760683
Cites: Circ Res. 1996 May;78(5):780-98620597
Cites: Am J Physiol. 1996 Dec;271(6 Pt 1):E941-518997211
Cites: Nat Genet. 1997 Dec;17(4):387-929398838
Cites: Biochem J. 1999 Mar 15;338 ( Pt 3):769-7610051451
Cites: Glia. 2000 Mar;30(1):92-10410696148
Cites: Nature. 2000 Sep 14;407(6801):233-4111001066
Cites: Nat Biotechnol. 2001 Jan;19(1):45-5011135551
Cites: FASEB J. 2001 Feb;15(2):312-2111156947
Cites: Atherosclerosis. 2001 Mar;155(1):45-5211223425
Cites: World Health Organ Tech Rep Ser. 2000;894:i-xii, 1-25311234459
Cites: Cell. 2001 Feb 23;104(4):503-1611239408
Cites: Neuroscientist. 2001 Jun;7(3):232-4511499402
Cites: Hypertension. 2002 Feb;39(2 Pt 2):508-1211882599
Cites: Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2002 Aug;283(2):H671-912124215
Cites: Twin Res. 2002 Oct;5(5):366-7112537860
Cites: J Mol Cell Cardiol. 2003 Nov;35(11):1375-8414596794
Cites: Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2003 Dec;285(6):E1151-6014607781
Cites: Biochim Biophys Acta. 2003 Nov 15;1634(3):6114643793
Cites: Biochem Soc Trans. 2004 Feb;32(Pt 1):147-5014748736
Cites: FASEB J. 2004 Jun;18(9):1040-215084525
Cites: Diabetologia. 2004 Jun;47(6):1118-2515168018
Cites: Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2004 Sep;24(9):1640-515178563
Cites: Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2005 Apr;288(4):E768-7415585588
Cites: J Lipid Res. 2005 May;46(5):839-6115722563
Cites: Curr Mol Med. 2005 May;5(3):297-30815892649
Cites: Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol. 2005 Aug;289(2):L176-8515764646
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2005 Jul 26;102(30):10604-916009939
Cites: Nat Rev Drug Discov. 2005 Jul;4(7):594-61016052242
Cites: Bioinformatics. 2006 Mar 1;22(5):634-616403790
Cites: Nature. 2006 Apr 13;440(7086):944-816612386
Cites: Mol Diagn Ther. 2006;10(2):101-816669608
Cites: Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol. 2006 Jul;291(1):L91-10116461426
Cites: Expert Rev Mol Diagn. 2006 Jul;6(4):575-8516824031
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2006 Jul;91(7):2776-8116608891
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2006 May;14(5):826-3716855192
Cites: BMC Genomics. 2006;7:14216762068
Cites: Diabetes. 2006 Sep;55(9):2579-8716936207
Cites: PLoS One. 2006;1:e9717183729
Cites: Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2007 Feb;292(2):H904-1117012356
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2004 Sep;89(9):4414-2115356040
Cites: Lancet. 2004 Sep 11-17;364(9438):937-5215364185
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1971 Nov;33(5):732-85166455
Cites: Clin Chem. 1972 Jun;18(6):499-5024337382
Cites: Biochim Biophys Acta. 1973 Oct 17;326(1):34-424127872
Cites: Am J Physiol. 1979 Sep;237(3):E214-23382871
Cites: Diabetes. 1985 Oct;34(10):1055-84043554
Cites: J Clin Invest. 1987 Jun;79(6):1713-93294899
Cites: Atherosclerosis. 1999 Mar;143(1):201-410208496
Cites: J Biol Chem. 1999 Sep 3;274(36):25189-9210464236
Cites: Pharmacol Res. 1999 Sep;40(3):211-2510479465
Cites: Twin Res. 2004 Oct;7(5):421-915527657
Cites: Blood. 2005 Feb 1;105(3):1127-3415383458
Cites: Appl Bioinformatics. 2004;3(4):205-1715702951
Cites: Mol Cell Biochem. 1992 Aug 18;113(2):151-691518506
PubMed ID
17299598 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acrylamide exposure measured by food frequency questionnaire and hemoglobin adduct levels and prostate cancer risk in the Cancer of the Prostate in Sweden Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90434
Source
Int J Cancer. 2009 May 15;124(10):2384-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2009
Author
Wilson Kathryn M
Bälter Katarina
Adami Hans-Olov
Grönberg Henrik
Vikström Anna C
Paulsson Birgit
Törnqvist Margareta
Mucci Lorelei A
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA. kwilson@hsph.harvard.edu
Source
Int J Cancer. 2009 May 15;124(10):2384-90
Date
May-15-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrylamide - toxicity
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Diet Records
Hemoglobins - metabolism
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Prostatic Neoplasms - blood - chemically induced - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Acrylamide, a probable human carcinogen, is formed during the cooking of many commonly consumed foods. Data are scant on whether dietary acrylamide represents an important cancer risk in humans. We studied the association between acrylamide and prostate cancer risk using 2 measures of acrylamide exposure: intake from a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and acrylamide adducts to hemoglobin. We also studied the correlation between these 2 exposure measures. We used data from the population-based case-control study Cancer of the Prostate in Sweden (CAPS). Dietary data was available for 1,499 cases and 1,118 controls. Hemoglobin adducts of acrylamide were measured in blood samples from a subset of 170 cases and 161 controls. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) for the risk of prostate cancer in high versus low quantiles of acrylamide exposure using logistic regression. The correlation between FFQ acrylamide intake and acrylamide adducts in non-smokers was 0.25 (95% confidence interval: 0.14-0.35), adjusted for age, region, energy intake, and laboratory batch. Among controls the correlation was 0.35 (95% CI: 0.21-0.48); among cases it was 0.15 (95% CI: 0.00-0.30). The OR of prostate cancer for the highest versus lowest quartile of acrylamide adducts was 0.93 (95% CI: 0.47-1.85, p-value for trend = 0.98). For FFQ acrylamide, the OR of prostate cancer for the highest versus lowest quintile was 0.97 (95% CI: 0.75-1.27, p trend = 0.67). No significant associations were found between acrylamide exposure and risk of prostate cancer by stage, grade, or PSA level. Acrylamide adducts to hemoglobin and FFQ-measured acrylamide intake were moderately correlated. Neither measure of acrylamide exposure-hemoglobin adducts or FFQ-was associated with risk of prostate cancer.
PubMed ID
19142870 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acrylamide intake through diet and human cancer risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92784
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2008 Aug 13;56(15):6013-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-13-2008
Author
Mucci Lorelei A
Wilson Kathryn M
Author Affiliation
Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 181 Longwood Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. lmucci@hsph.harvard.edu
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2008 Aug 13;56(15):6013-9
Date
Aug-13-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrylamide - administration & dosage - analysis - toxicity
Adult
Animals
Body Weight
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Child
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Diet
Diet Records
Female
Food analysis
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Models, Animal
Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
More than one-third of the calories consumed by U.S. and European populations contain acrylamide, a substance classified as a "probable human carcinogen" based on laboratory data. Thus, it is a public health concern to evaluate whether intake of acrylamide at levels found in the food supply is an important cancer risk factor. Mean dietary intake of acrylamide in adults averages 0.5 microg/kg of body weight per day, whereas intake is higher among children. Several epidemiological studies examining the relationship between dietary intake of acrylamide and cancers of the colon, rectum, kidney, bladder, and breast have been undertaken. These studies found no association between intake of specific foods containing acrylamide and risk of these cancers. Moreover, there was no relationship between estimated acrylamide intake in the diet and cancer risk. Results of this research are compared with other epidemiological studies, and the findings are examined in the context of data from animal models. The importance of epidemiological studies to establish the public health risk associated with acrylamide in food is discussed, as are the limitations and future directions of such studies.
PubMed ID
18624443 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adequacy of nutritional intake in a Canadian population of patients with Crohn's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161617
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2007 Sep;107(9):1575-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Elaheh Aghdassi
Barbara E Wendland
Melanie Stapleton
Maitreyi Raman
Johane P Allard
Author Affiliation
The University Health Network, Toronto, Canada.
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2007 Sep;107(9):1575-80
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Canada
Crohn Disease - diet therapy - physiopathology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - standards
Diet Records
Dietary Supplements
Energy intake
Female
Humans
Male
Minerals - administration & dosage
Nutrition Policy
Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Nutritional Requirements
Nutritional Status
Severity of Illness Index
Vitamins - administration & dosage
Abstract
Crohn's disease is frequently associated with nutritional deficiencies, often a result of disease activity and poor oral intake. This study investigated the adequacy of dietary intake, based on the Canadian Dietary Reference Intake, in ambulatory patients with Crohn's disease and a normal body mass index (BMI; calculated as kg/m(2)). This was a cross-sectional study of 74 patients with mean age of 35.7+/-1.4 years and BMI of 23.05+/-0.45. All patients completed a 7-day food record and a diary for the Crohn's Disease Activity Index. Mean Crohn's Disease Activity Index was 138.99+/-11.38. Energy and protein intakes were within the recommended levels of intake, but total carbohydrates, fat, and saturated fat intake exceeded the recommended levels of
PubMed ID
17761234 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adherence to dietary recommendations for Swedish adults across categories of greenhouse gas emissions from food.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293496
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 Dec; 20(18):3381-3393
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Camilla Sjörs
Fredrik Hedenus
Arvid Sjölander
Annika Tillander
Katarina Bälter
Author Affiliation
1Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics (MEB),Karolinska Institutet,Nobels väg 12a,SE-171 77 Stockholm,Sweden.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 Dec; 20(18):3381-3393
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Carbon Dioxide - analysis
Diet
Diet Records
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Exercise
Female
Greenhouse Gases - analysis
Humans
Male
Micronutrients - administration & dosage
Middle Aged
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Surveys
Patient compliance
Recommended dietary allowances
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
To explore associations between diet-related greenhouse gas emissions (GHGE), nutrient intakes and adherence to the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations among Swedish adults.
Diet was assessed by 4d food records in the Swedish National Dietary Survey. GHGE was estimated by linking all foods to carbon dioxide equivalents, using data from life cycle assessment studies. Participants were categorized into quartiles of energy-adjusted GHGE and differences between GHGE groups regarding nutrient intakes and adherence to nutrient recommendations were explored.
Sweden.
Women (n 840) and men (n 627) aged 18-80 years.
Differences in nutrient intakes and adherence to nutrient recommendations between GHGE groups were generally small. The dietary intake of participants with the lowest emissions was more in line with recommendations regarding protein, carbohydrates, dietary fibre and vitamin D, but further from recommendations regarding added sugar, compared with the highest GHGE group. The overall adherence to recommendations was found to be better among participants with lower emissions compared with higher emissions. Among women, 27 % in the lowest GHGE group adhered to at least twenty-three recommendations compared with only 12 % in the highest emission group. For men, the corresponding figures were 17 and 10 %, respectively.
The study compared nutrient intakes as well as adherence to dietary recommendations for diets with different levels of GHGE from a national dietary survey. We found that participants with low-emission diets, despite higher intake of added sugar, adhered to a larger number of dietary recommendations than those with high emissions.
PubMed ID
28879831 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adherence to special diets and its association with meeting the nutrient recommendations in individuals with type 1 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294978
Source
Acta Diabetol. 2018 Aug; 55(8):843-851
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2018
Author
A J Ahola
C Forsblom
Per-Henrik Groop
Author Affiliation
Folkhälsan Institute of Genetics, Folkhälsan Research Center, University of Helsinki, Biomedicum Helsinki C318b, PO Box 63, 00014, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Diabetol. 2018 Aug; 55(8):843-851
Date
Aug-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - diet therapy - epidemiology
Diet - methods - statistics & numerical data
Diet Records
Diet, Diabetic - standards - statistics & numerical data
Energy Intake - physiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Policy
Nutrition Surveys
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Not much is known about adherence to special diets in type 1 diabetes, characteristics of individuals with special diets, and whether such practices should raise concerns with respect to meeting the dietary recommendations. In this study, we assessed the frequencies of adherence to special diets, in a population of individuals with type 1 diabetes, and investigated the association between special diet adherence and dietary intake, measured as dietary patterns and nutrient intakes.
During the Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy Study visit, participants with type 1 diabetes (n?=?1429) were instructed to complete a diet questionnaire inquiring about the adherence to special diets. The participants also completed a food record, from which energy and nutrient intakes were calculated.
In all, 36.6% participants reported adhering to some special diet. Most commonly reported special diets were lactose-free (17.1%), protein restriction (10.0%), vegetarian (7.0%), and gluten-free (5.6%) diet. Special diet adherents were more frequently women, older, had longer diabetes duration, and more frequently had various diabetes complications. Mean carbohydrate intakes were close to the lower levels of the recommendation in all diet groups, which was reflected in low mean fibre intakes but high frequencies of meeting the sucrose recommendations. The recommendation for saturated fatty acid intake was frequently unmet, with the highest frequencies observed in vegetarians. Of the micronutrients, vitamin D, folate, and iron recommendations were most frequently unmet, with some differences between the diet groups.
Special diets are frequently followed by individuals with type 1 diabetes. The adherents are more frequently women, and have longer diabetes duration and more diabetes complications. Achieving the dietary recommendations differed between diets, and depended on the nutrient in question. Overall, intakes of fibre, vitamin D, folate, and iron fell short of the recommendations.
PubMed ID
29777369 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alkylresorcinol metabolites in urine correlate with the intake of whole grains and cereal fibre in free-living Swedish adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125563
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Jan 14;109(1):129-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-14-2013
Author
Matti Marklund
Rikard Landberg
Agneta Andersson
Per Åman
Afaf Kamal-Eldin
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Science, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7051, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden. matti.marklund@slu.se
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Jan 14;109(1):129-36
Date
Jan-14-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Algorithms
Alkylation
Biological Markers - urine
Cereals - chemistry - metabolism
Creatinine - urine
Diet Records
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage - metabolism
Female
Food Handling
Humans
Hydroxybenzoates - metabolism - urine
Male
Middle Aged
Phenols - metabolism - urine
Phenylpropionates
Propionates - metabolism - urine
Reproducibility of Results
Resorcinols - metabolism - urine
Secale cereale - chemistry
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
Alkylresorcinols (AR) have been established as short/medium-term biomarkers for whole grain (WG) wheat and rye intake; and AR metabolites, 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid and 3-(3,5-dihydroxyphenyl)-propanoic acid, have been suggested as complementary biomarkers to AR. The present study examined the medium-term reproducibility and relative validity of urinary AR metabolites as biomarkers for WG and cereal fibre intake. A total of sixty-six free-living Swedes completed 3 d weighed food records and provided single 24 h urine collections and morning urine spot samples on two occasions, 2-3 months apart. The medium-term reproducibility of urinary AR metabolites was moderate when assessed in 24 h collections and lower in creatinine (CR)-adjusted morning urine. Mean AR metabolite 24 h excretions correlated well with total WG (r(s) 0·31-0·52, P
PubMed ID
22470195 View in PubMed
Less detail

Analysis of 24-hour recalls of 164 fourth- to sixth-grade Mohawk children in Kahnawake.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205123
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 1998 Jul;98(7):814-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1998

Analyzing bivariate continuous data grouped into categories defined by empirical quantiles of marginal distributions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207630
Source
Biometrics. 1997 Sep;53(3):1054-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1997
Author
C B Borkowf
M H Gail
R J Carroll
R D Gill
Author Affiliation
National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-7368, USA.
Source
Biometrics. 1997 Sep;53(3):1054-69
Date
Sep-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Biometry - methods
Chi-Square Distribution
Confidence Intervals
Diet Records
Epidemiologic Methods
Finland
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Questionnaires
Vitamin E
Abstract
Epidemiologists sometimes study the association between two measurements of exposure on the same subjects by grouping the original bivariate continuous data into categories that are defined by the empirical quantiles of the two marginal distributions. Although such grouped data are presented in a two-way contingency table, the cell counts in this table do not have a multinomial distribution. We describe the joint distribution of counts in such a table by the term empirical bivariate quantile-partitioned (EBQP) distribution. Blomqvist (1950, Annals of Mathematical Statistics 21, 539-600) gave an asymptotic EBQP theory for bivariate data partitioned by the sample medians. We demonstrate that his asymptotic theory is not correct, however, except in special cases. We present a general asymptotic theory for tables of arbitrary dimensions and apply this theory to construct confidence intervals for the kappa statistic. We show by simulations that the confidence interval procedures we propose have near nominal coverage for sample sizes exceeding 60 for both 2 x 2 and 3 x 3 tables. These simulations also illustrate that the asymptotic theory of Blomqvist (1950) and the methods that Fleiss, Cohen, and Everitt (1969, Psychological Bulletin 72, 323-327) give for multinomial tables can yield subnominal coverage for kappa calculated from EBQP tables, although in some cases the coverage for these procedures is near nominal levels.
PubMed ID
9290229 View in PubMed
Less detail

353 records – page 1 of 36.