Skip header and navigation

Refine By

12 records – page 1 of 2.

Adolescent nutrition: 6. Fast foods, food fads and the educational challenge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241545
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1983 Oct 1;129(7):692-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-1983
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1983 Oct 1;129(7):692-5
Date
Oct-1-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Diet Fads
Health education
Humans
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Sciences - education
Notes
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1973 Nov 29;289(22):1180-24271091
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 1975 Jan;66(1):28-311110296
Cites: Nutr Rev. 1981 Feb;39(2):73-887010234
Cites: Klin Med (Mosk). 1978 Jun;56(6):127-8672150
Cites: J Fla Med Assoc. 1979 Apr;66(4):475-81430025
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1975 Jun;82(6):8101138591
PubMed ID
6616378 View in PubMed
Less detail

"Diet pills" and major depression in the Canadian population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194126
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2001 Jun;46(5):438-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
S B Patten
Author Affiliation
Departments of Community Health Sciences and Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, AB T2N 4N1. patten@ucalgary.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2001 Jun;46(5):438-40
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Appetite Depressants - adverse effects
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder, Major - chemically induced - epidemiology
Diet Fads - adverse effects
Female
Fenfluramine - adverse effects
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Abstract
To evaluate epidemiological associations between self-reported diet pill consumption and major depressive episodes (MDEs), using data from a large-scale, cross-sectional survey of the Canadian population.
Data from the National Population Health Survey (NPHS) were used in this analysis. The NPHS interview included a brief version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) depression section, known as the CIDI Short Form for Major Depression (CIDI-SFMD), as well as provision for self-reported medication use.
Approximately 0.5% of the population reported the use of diet pills. Diet pill use was more common among women than among men. At the time of data collection (1996-1997), the most commonly used medication was fenfluramine (since withdrawn from the market because of cardiovascular toxicity). The use of these medications was strongly associated with MDE: the annual prevalence among persons reporting use was 17.1% (95% CI, 8.6 to 25.6), approximately 4 times the underlying population rate.
Because the NPHS was a general health survey, and because self-reported exposure to these medications was relatively uncommon, the data did not permit a detailed multivariate analysis. These findings, however, indicate that depressive psychopathology is strongly associated with the use of appetite-suppressant medications.
PubMed ID
11441784 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Lancet. 2009 Sep 5;374(9692):767-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-5-2009

Long-term effects of commonly available weight reducing programmes in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235872
Source
Int J Obes. 1987;11(1):67-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
H. Björvell
S. Rössner
Source
Int J Obes. 1987;11(1):67-71
Date
1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Weight
Diet Fads
Diet, Reducing
Female
Food, Formulated
Humans
Middle Aged
Obesity - diet therapy - psychology
Patient compliance
Sweden
Abstract
A majority of people attempting to lose weight will use methods that do not involve medical expertise or professional organizations. Consumer organizations continually have problems with so-called slimming products which claim results that are scientifically unfounded and impossible. In this study four methods commonly used in Sweden were studied with emphasis on long-term effects. One-hundred and twenty moderately overweight women were allocated to one of five groups and repeatedly interviewed and monitored over a 2-year period. The long-term results with a protein powder preparation and a kelp-lecithin-vitamin capsule were poor. However, results were also poor with the nutritionally adequate recommendations issued by the Stockholm Home Economics consultation service but lacking programme support or follow-up. The weight losing programme of a 'slim club' was found to result in the greatest overall sustained weight loss (2.8 +/- 4.7 kg, mean +/- s.d.). An attempt to define 'compliance' with each programme was made, which showed that the majority of overweight women were not able to adhere to these given programmes for a 2-year period, probably because of unsatisfactory results. We consider it essential to document the long-term outcome of these methods in order to facilitate understanding of the situation of these overweight subjects and to assist consumer organizations in their efforts to prevent the spread of scientifically unsound weight reduction methods.
PubMed ID
3570638 View in PubMed
Less detail

Low-fat or low-carbohydrate diet for cardiovascular health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160788
Source
Can J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2007;17(3):19-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Donna Best
Patricia Grainger
Author Affiliation
Memorial University School of Nursing, St. John's, NL A1B 3V6. dbest@mun.ca
Source
Can J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2007;17(3):19-26
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Diet Fads
Diet, Carbohydrate-Restricted - methods - standards
Diet, Fat-Restricted - methods - standards
Diet, Reducing - methods
Energy intake
Evidence-Based Medicine
Humans
Obesity - complications - diet therapy
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Weight Loss
Abstract
Obesity is a major, modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Climbing obesity rates are leaving Canadians at increased risk for disability, disease and premature death. This has led to increased interest in dietary interventions to control weight and reduce obesity. While a low-fat diet has been promoted for more than 20 years to reduce cardiovascular risk, recently there has been a proliferation of new diets that promise fast, successful weight loss. The marketing strategies of diet promoters have led consumers and health care professionals to consider the benefits and risks of these diets for cardiovascular health. The purpose of this paper is to compare the traditional low-fat diet with one such dietary innovation -- the low-carbohydrate diet. Research studies are reviewed to provide some evidence for practice in assisting patients to improve cardiovascular health through weight loss.
PubMed ID
17941565 View in PubMed
Less detail

Nutrition for all. Medical interest seems to be awakening.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature250067
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1977 Mar 5;116(5):531-3, 536
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-5-1977
Author
D. Woods
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1977 Mar 5;116(5):531-3, 536
Date
Mar-5-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Diet
Diet Fads
Humans
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Obesity - epidemiology
PubMed ID
837321 View in PubMed
Less detail

Patterns of food intake in childhood and adolescence and risk of later disease or "the awful food kids eat nowadays must be bad for them".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature39510
Source
Aust N Z J Med. 1985 Aug;15(4):478-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1985

The sense and nonsense of the best-selling diet books.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243336
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1982 Mar 15;126(6):696-701
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-1982
Author
J. Swartz
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1982 Mar 15;126(6):696-701
Date
Mar-15-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Books
Canada
Diet Fads - adverse effects
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Humans
Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
PubMed ID
7066828 View in PubMed
Less detail

12 records – page 1 of 2.