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4-Nonylphenol and bisphenol A in Swedish food and exposure in Swedish nursing women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125631
Source
Environ Int. 2012 Aug;43:21-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Irina Gyllenhammar
Anders Glynn
Per Ola Darnerud
Sanna Lignell
Rob van Delft
Marie Aune
Author Affiliation
National Food Agency, P.O. Box 622, 75126 Uppsala, Sweden. irina.gyllenhammar@slv.se
Source
Environ Int. 2012 Aug;43:21-8
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Benzhydryl Compounds
Breast Feeding - statistics & numerical data
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Endocrine Disruptors - analysis - blood - metabolism
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - blood - metabolism
Female
Food analysis
Food Contamination - statistics & numerical data
Fruit - chemistry
Humans
Maternal Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Meat - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Phenols - analysis - blood - metabolism
Sweden
Vegetables - chemistry
Young Adult
Abstract
4-Nonylphenol (NP) and bisphenol A (BPA) are phenolic substances used in high volumes by the industry. Studies on cells and in experimental animals have shown that both these compounds can be classified as estrogenic hormone disrupters. Information about the exposure of humans to NP and BPA is still scarce, especially regarding levels in human blood. The first aim of this study was to investigate possible sources of NP and BPA exposure from food, by analyzing the levels of NP and BPA from a Swedish food market basket, based on the Swedish per capita food consumption. A second aim was to investigate blood serum levels of NP and BPA, as well as NP-ethoxylates, among young women in Sweden (n=100). Moreover, associations between food consumption and blood NP and BPA levels were studied. In food, NP was to some extent found at levels above limit of quantification (LOQ 20 ng/g fresh weight) in fruits, cereal products, vegetables, and potatoes. BPA levels above LOQ (2 ng/g fresh weight) were found in fish, meats, potatoes, and dairy products. The estimated mean intakes per capita were (medium bound) 27 µg NP/day and 3.9 µg BPA/day, showing that food is a source of BPA and NP in the general Swedish population. In blood serum, free NP above limit of detection (LOD 0.5 ng/g) was detected in 46% of the study participants while detectable levels of total NP (LOD 0.8 ng/g) were observed in 43%. The corresponding percentages for BPA were 25% and 22%, respectively. The results indicate that there is a continuous source of exposure to NP and BPA that is high enough for free NP and BPA to be detected in some consumers. Among the participants with quantifiable levels of free and total NP (n=38), 85% (median, range: 38-112%) of the NP was present as free NP. For BPA 76% (49-109%) was detected as free BPA (n=15). All women had levels of ethoxylates of NP below LOD (0.1-0.7 ng/g). A significantly higher total consumption of fruits and vegetables was reported in questionnaires by participants with NP levels at or above LOD than among women with levels below LOD. This result is supporting the market basket results of relatively high NP levels in these types of food.
PubMed ID
22466019 View in PubMed
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25-Hydroxyvitamin D in Canadian adults: biological, environmental, and behavioral correlates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141385
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2011 May;22(5):1389-99
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
L S Greene-Finestone
C. Berger
M. de Groh
D A Hanley
N. Hidiroglou
K. Sarafin
S. Poliquin
J. Krieger
J B Richards
D. Goltzman
Author Affiliation
Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. linda.greene-finestone@phac-aspc.gc.ca
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2011 May;22(5):1389-99
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Body mass index
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Dietary Supplements
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications - epidemiology
Seasons
Sex Distribution
Skin Pigmentation - physiology
Sunlight
Vitamin D - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
We assessed vitamin D status and its correlates in the population-based Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos). Results showed that serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels
PubMed ID
20730415 View in PubMed
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25(OH)D levels in trained versus sedentary university students at 64° north.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290407
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1314414
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
2017
Author
Scott P Jerome
Kendra D Sticka
Theresia M Schnurr
Sally J Mangum
Arleigh J Reynolds
Kriya L Dunlap
Author Affiliation
a Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry , University of Alaska Fairbanks , Fairbanks , AK , USA.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1314414
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Arctic Regions
Athletes - statistics & numerical data
Body Weights and Measures
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Dietary Supplements
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Humans
Male
Metabolic Equivalent
Sedentary lifestyle
Students
Sunlight
Universities
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) deficiency is associated with compromised bone mineralisation, fatigue, suppressed immune function and unsatisfactory skeletal muscle recovery. We investigated the risk of 25(OH)D insufficiency or deficiency in endurance athletes compared to sedentary non-athletes living at 64° north.
University student-athletes (TS) and sedentary students (SS) volunteered to participate in this study. TS engaged in regular exercise while SS exercised no more than 20 minutes/week. Metabolic Equivalent of Task (MET) scores for participants were determined. Vitamin D intake was assessed using the National Cancer Institute's 24-hour food recall (ASA24). Fasting plasma 25(OH)D levels were quantified via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.
TS reported higher activity levels than SS as assessed with MET-minutes/week and ranking of physical activity levels (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
28452288 View in PubMed
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Adherence to the Danish food-based dietary guidelines and risk of myocardial infarction: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299380
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2018 05; 21(7):1286-1296
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-2018
Author
Camilla Plambeck Hansen
Kim Overvad
Inge Tetens
Anne Tjønneland
Erik Thorlund Parner
Marianne Uhre Jakobsen
Christina Catherine Dahm
Author Affiliation
1Section for Epidemiology,Department of Public Health,Aarhus University,Bartholins Allé 2,DK-8000 Aarhus C,Denmark.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2018 05; 21(7):1286-1296
Date
05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology
Nutrition Policy
Nutritive Value
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
A direct way to evaluate food-based dietary guidelines is to assess if adherence is associated with development of non-communicable diseases. Thus, the objective was to develop an index to assess adherence to the 2013 Danish food-based dietary guidelines and to investigate the association between adherence to the index and risk of myocardial infarction (MI).
Population-based cohort study with recruitment of participants in 1993-1997. Information on dietary intake was collected at baseline using an FFQ and an index ranging from 0 to 6 points was created to assess adherence to the 2013 Danish food-based dietary guidelines. MI cases were identified by record linkage to the Danish National Patient Register and the Causes of Death Register. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) of MI.
Greater areas of Aarhus and Copenhagen, Denmark.
Men and women aged 50-64 years (n 55 021) from the Diet, Cancer and Health study.
A total of 3046 participants were diagnosed with first-time MI during a median follow-up of 16·9 years. A higher Danish Dietary Guidelines Index score was associated with a lower risk of MI. After adjustment for potential confounders, the hazard of MI was 13 % lower among men with a score of 3-
PubMed ID
29331164 View in PubMed
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Adipose tissue fatty acids as biomarkers of dietary exposure in Danish men and women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24046
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 1993 May;57(5):629-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1993
Author
A. Tjønneland
K. Overvad
E. Thorling
M. Ewertz
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Registry, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen.
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 1993 May;57(5):629-33
Date
May-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - metabolism
Adult
Biological Markers - analysis
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Fatty Acids - analysis
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Adipose tissue fatty acids, it has been proposed, reflect dietary intake. Using data from a validation study preceding a prospective study on diet, cancer, and health in Denmark, we were able to compare fatty acid profiles in adipose tissue biopsies from 86 individuals (23 men and 63 women) aged 40-64 y and dietary intake of fatty acids (as percentage of total fat) assessed by two 7-d weighed-diet records or by a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Correlation coefficients (Pearson r) between fatty acid concentrations in adipose tissue biopsies (as percentage of total peak area) and dietary intake of fatty acid (percentage of total fat), determined from the diet records for men and women, respectively, were as follows: polyunsaturated fatty acids r = 0.74 and r = 0.46; n - 3 fatty acids of marine origin: eicosapentaenoic acid r = 0.15 and r = 0.61, and docosahexaenoic acid r = 0.47 and r = 0.57. Correlation coefficients obtained by using the food frequency questionnaire were slightly lower for most fatty acids.
PubMed ID
8480677 View in PubMed
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Adult-type hypolactasia is not a predisposing factor for the early functional and structural changes of atherosclerosis: the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159355
Source
Clin Sci (Lond). 2008 Nov;115(9):265-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Terho Lehtimäki
Nina Hutri-Kähönen
Mika Kähönen
Jukka Hemminki
Vera Mikkilä
Marika Laaksonen
Leena Räsänen
Nina Mononen
Markus Juonala
Jukka Marniemi
Jorma Viikari
Olli Raitakari
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Atherosclerosis Genetics, Department of Clinical Chemistry, Tampere University Hospital and the Medical School at the University of Tampere, 33014 Tampere, Finland. terho.lehtimaki@uta.fi
Source
Clin Sci (Lond). 2008 Nov;115(9):265-71
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Atherosclerosis - epidemiology - etiology - genetics - physiopathology
Brachial Artery - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Carotid Arteries - pathology - ultrasonography
Dairy Products - statistics & numerical data
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Humans
Lactase - deficiency
Lactase-Phlorizin Hydrolase - genetics
Lactose Intolerance - complications - epidemiology - genetics - pathology
Male
Polymorphism, Genetic
Tunica Intima - pathology - ultrasonography
Tunica Media - pathology - ultrasonography
Vasodilation
Abstract
Individuals suffering from ATH (adult-type hypolactasia), defined by the LCT (gene encoding lactase-phlorizin hydrolase) C/C(-13910) genotype (rs4988235), use less milk and dairy products and may have higher plasma HDL (high-density lipoprotein) and lower triacylglycerol (triglyceride) concentrations than their counterparts without ATH. To investigate the effects of ATH status on the early markers of atherosclerosis, we examined its association with CIMT (carotid intima-media thickness), CAC (carotid artery compliance) and brachial artery FMD (flow-mediated dilation) in a young population-based cohort of otherwise healthy individuals. As part of the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study, we performed CIMT, CAC and FMD analyses, LCT C/T(-13910) genotyping and risk factor determination in 2109 young subjects 24-39 years of age (45% males) at the time of the examination. The consumption of both milk and dairy products was lowest and the consumption of alcohol highest in subjects with the C/C(-13910) genotype (P
PubMed ID
18194137 View in PubMed
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Animal source food intake and association with blood cholesterol, glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids in a northern Swedish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107708
Source
Pages 421-427 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):421-427
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 document  
Author
Wilmar Igl
Afaf Kamal-Eldin
Asa Johansson
Gerhard Liebisch
Carsten Gnewuch
Gerd Schmitz
Ulf Gyllensten
Author Affiliation
Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Rudbeck Laboratory, University of Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Pages 421-427 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):421-427
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Wild
Cholesterol - blood
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Female
Glycerophospholipids - blood
Humans
Male
Meat - adverse effects
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Risk factors
Sphingolipids - blood
Sweden - epidemiology
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
The high intake of game meat in populations with a subsistence-based diet may affect their blood lipids and health status.
To examine the association between diet and circulating levels of blood lipid levels in a northern Swedish population.
We compared a group with traditional lifestyle (TLS) based on reindeer herding (TLS group) with those from the same area with a non-traditional lifestyle (NTLS) typical of more industrialized regions of Sweden (NTLS group). The analysis was based on self-reported intake of animal source food (i.e. non-game meat, game meat, fish, dairy products and eggs) and the serum blood level of a number of lipids [total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL), triglycerides (TG), glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids].
The TLS group had higher cholesterol, LDL and HDL levels than the reference group. Of the TLS group, 65% had cholesterol levels above the threshold for increased risk of coronary heart disease (= 240 mg/dl), as compared to 38% of the NTLS group. Self-reported consumption of game meat was positively associated with TC and LDL.
The high game meat consumption of the TLS group is associated with increased cholesterol levels. High intake of animal protein and fat and low fibre is known to increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, but other studies of the TLS in northern Sweden have shown comparable incidences of cardiovascular disease to the reference (NTLS) group from the same geographical area. This indicates that factors other than TC influence disease risk. One such possible factor is dietary phospholipids, which are also found in high amounts specifically in game meat and have been shown to inhibit cholesterol absorption.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23984293 View in PubMed
Documents
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Assessing validity of a short food frequency questionnaire on present dietary intake of elderly Icelanders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126210
Source
Nutr J. 2012;11:12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Tinna Eysteinsdottir
Inga Thorsdottir
Ingibjorg Gunnarsdottir
Laufey Steingrimsdottir
Author Affiliation
Unit for Nutrition Research, University of Iceland and Landspitali National-University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. tinnaey@landspitali.is
Source
Nutr J. 2012;11:12
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Animals
Cod Liver Oil
Coffee
Dairy Products
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Diet Records
Diet Surveys
Energy intake
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Iceland
Interviews as Topic
Male
Meat
Nutrition Assessment
Questionnaires - standards
Sex Factors
Tea
Vegetables
Abstract
Few studies exist on the validity of food frequency questionnaires (FFQs) administered to elderly people. The aim of this study was to assess the validity of a short FFQ on present dietary intake, developed specially for the AGES-Reykjavik Study, which includes 5,764 elderly individuals. Assessing the validity of FFQs is essential before they are used in studies on diet-related disease risk and health outcomes.
128 healthy elderly participants (74 y ± 5.7; 58.6% female) answered the AGES-FFQ, and subsequently filled out a 3-day weighed food record. Validity of the AGES-FFQ was assessed by comparing its answers to the dietary data obtained from the weighed food records, using Spearman's rank correlation, Chi-Square/Kendall's tau, and a Jonckheere-Terpstra test for trend.
For men a correlation = 0.4 was found for potatoes, fresh fruits, oatmeal/muesli, cakes/cookies, candy, dairy products, milk, pure fruit juice, cod liver oil, coffee, tea and sugar in coffee/tea (r = 0.40-0.71). A lower, but acceptable, correlation was also found for raw vegetables (r = 0.33). The highest correlation for women was found for consumption of rye bread, oatmeal/muesli, raw vegetables, candy, dairy products, milk, pure fruit juice, cod liver oil, coffee and tea (r = 0.40-0.61). An acceptable correlation was also found for fish topping/salad, fresh fruit, blood/liver sausage, whole-wheat bread, and sugar in coffee/tea (r = 0.28-0.37). Questions on meat/fish meals, cooked vegetables and soft drinks did not show a significant correlation to the reference method. Pearson Chi-Square and Kendall's tau showed similar results, as did the Jonckheere-Terpstra trend test.
A majority of the questions in the AGES-FFQ had an acceptable correlation and may be used to rank individuals according to their level of intake of several important foods/food groups. The AGES-FFQ on present diet may therefore be used to study the relationship between consumption of several specific foods/food groups and various health-related endpoints gathered in the AGES-Reykjavik Study.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22413931 View in PubMed
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The association between habitual diet quality and the common mental disorders in community-dwelling adults: the Hordaland Health study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133326
Source
Psychosom Med. 2011 Jul-Aug;73(6):483-90
Publication Type
Article
Author
Felice N Jacka
Arnstein Mykletun
Michael Berk
Ingvar Bjelland
Grethe S Tell
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical and Biomedical Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Barwon Health, Geelong, Australia. felice@barwonhealth.org.au
Source
Psychosom Med. 2011 Jul-Aug;73(6):483-90
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anxiety - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - epidemiology
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Exercise
Female
Food Habits - psychology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Recent evidence suggests a role for diet quality in the common mental disorders depression and anxiety. We aimed to investigate the association between diet quality, dietary patterns, and the common mental disorders in Norwegian adults.
This cross-sectional study included 5731 population-based men and women aged 46 to 49 and 70 to 74 years. Habitual diet was assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire, and mental health was measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale.
After adjustments for variables including age, education, income, physical activity, smoking, and alcohol consumption, an a priori healthy diet quality score was inversely related to depression (odds ratio [OR] = 0.71, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.59-0.84) and anxiety (OR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.68-0.87) in women and to depression (OR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.70-0.99) in men. Women scoring higher on a healthy dietary pattern were less likely to be depressed (OR = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.57-0.82) or anxious (OR = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.77-0.98), whereas men were more likely to be anxious (OR = 1.19, 95% CI = 1.03-1.38). A traditional Norwegian dietary pattern was also associated with reduced depression in women (OR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.64-0.92) and anxiety in men (OR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.61-0.96). A western-type diet was associated with increased anxiety in men (OR = 1.27, 95% CI = 1.14-1.42) and women (OR = 1.29, 95% CI = 1.17-1.43) before final adjustment for energy intake.
In this study, those with better quality diets were less likely to be depressed, whereas a higher intake of processed and unhealthy foods was associated with increased anxiety.
PubMed ID
21715296 View in PubMed
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Associations between children's diets and features of their residential and school neighbourhood food environments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128375
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012;103(9 Suppl 3):eS48-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Andraea Van Hulst
Tracie A Barnett
Lise Gauvin
Mark Daniel
Yan Kestens
Madeleine Bird
Katherine Gray-Donald
Marie Lambert
Author Affiliation
École de santé publique, Université de Montréal; Centre de recherche du CHU Sainte-Justine. a.van.hulst@umontreal.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012;103(9 Suppl 3):eS48-54
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Environment Design - statistics & numerical data
Fast Foods - statistics & numerical data
Female
Food Services - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Quebec
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Schools
Abstract
Among studies of the built environment, few examine neighbourhood food environments in relation to children's diets. We examined the associations of residential and school neighbourhood access to different types of food establishments with children's diets.
Data from QUALITY (Quebec Adipose and Lifestyle Investigation in Youth), an ongoing study on the natural history of obesity in 630 Quebec youth aged 8-10 years with a parental history of obesity, were analyzed (n=512). Three 24-hour diet recalls were used to assess dietary intake of vegetables and fruit, and sugar-sweetened beverages. Questionnaires were used to determine the frequency of eating/snacking out and consumption of delivered/take-out foods. We characterized residential and school neighbourhood food environments by means of a Geographic Information System. Variables included distance to the nearest supermarket, fast-food restaurant and convenience store, and densities of each food establishment type computed for 1 km network buffers around each child's residence and school. Retail Food Environment indices were also computed. Multivariable logistic regressions (residential access) and generalized estimating equations (school access) were used for analysis.
Residential and school neighbourhood access to supermarkets was not associated with children's diets. Residing in neighbourhoods with lower access to fast-food restaurants and convenience stores was associated with a lower likelihood of eating and snacking out. Children attending schools in neighbourhoods with a higher number of unhealthful relative to healthful food establishments scored most poorly on dietary outcomes.
Further investigations are needed to inform policies aimed at shaping neighbourhood-level food purchasing opportunities, particularly for access to fast-food restaurants and convenience stores.
PubMed ID
23618089 View in PubMed
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