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184 records – page 1 of 19.

Adequacy of nutritional intake in a Canadian population of patients with Crohn's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161617
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2007 Sep;107(9):1575-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Elaheh Aghdassi
Barbara E Wendland
Melanie Stapleton
Maitreyi Raman
Johane P Allard
Author Affiliation
The University Health Network, Toronto, Canada.
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2007 Sep;107(9):1575-80
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Canada
Crohn Disease - diet therapy - physiopathology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - standards
Diet Records
Dietary Supplements
Energy intake
Female
Humans
Male
Minerals - administration & dosage
Nutrition Policy
Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Nutritional Requirements
Nutritional Status
Severity of Illness Index
Vitamins - administration & dosage
Abstract
Crohn's disease is frequently associated with nutritional deficiencies, often a result of disease activity and poor oral intake. This study investigated the adequacy of dietary intake, based on the Canadian Dietary Reference Intake, in ambulatory patients with Crohn's disease and a normal body mass index (BMI; calculated as kg/m(2)). This was a cross-sectional study of 74 patients with mean age of 35.7+/-1.4 years and BMI of 23.05+/-0.45. All patients completed a 7-day food record and a diary for the Crohn's Disease Activity Index. Mean Crohn's Disease Activity Index was 138.99+/-11.38. Energy and protein intakes were within the recommended levels of intake, but total carbohydrates, fat, and saturated fat intake exceeded the recommended levels of
PubMed ID
17761234 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' diets do not comply with 2007 Canada's food guide recommendations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121934
Source
Appetite. 2012 Dec;59(3):668-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Melissa D Rossiter
Susan E Evers
Amy C Pender
Author Affiliation
Department of Applied Human Nutrition, Mount Saint Vincent University, 166 Bedford Highway, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3M 2J6. melissa.rossiter@msvu.ca
Source
Appetite. 2012 Dec;59(3):668-72
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Canada
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Diet - standards
Female
Food Habits
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Nutrition Policy
Poverty
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Students
Abstract
This study evaluated the eating behaviours of students in grade six and, three years later when they were in grade nine, relative to the recommendations of Canada's 2007 Food Guide. Students completed a self-administered questionnaire on eating behaviours in 2002 (n=647) and again in 2005 (n=520) as part of Better Beginnings, Better Futures, a primary prevention initiative among economically disadvantaged communities. McNemar analysis and X(2) analysis were used to assess differences in compliance with the recommendations of the Food Guide. Differences in the mean number of servings of the four food groups and the Other Foods group were examined using independent sample t-tests and paired t tests. In grade six, 5% of males and 7% of females met the minimum number of recommended servings for all four food groups. By grade nine this had dropped to 0.4% and 2% respectively. Among males who completed the questionnaire in both grade six and grade nine there was a decline in the mean number of daily servings for all four food groups. For females a similar trend was observed. The likelihood of adolescents meeting all Food Guide recommendations decreased from grade six to grade nine.
PubMed ID
22863950 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' low-carbohydrate-density diets are related to poorer dietary intakes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172239
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2005 Nov;105(11):1783-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
Linda S Greene-Finestone
M Karen Campbell
Susan E Evers
Iris A Gutmanis
Author Affiliation
Office of Nutrition Policy and Promotion, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Linda_Greene-Finestone@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2005 Nov;105(11):1783-8
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adolescent Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Child
Cluster analysis
Confidence Intervals
Diet - standards
Diet, Carbohydrate-Restricted - standards
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Exercise - physiology
Female
Health Behavior
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Micronutrients - administration & dosage
Nutritive Value
Obesity
Odds Ratio
Ontario
Questionnaires
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
This study was undertaken to assess how low-carbohydrate-density diets below the acceptable macronutrient distribution range relate to food and micronutrient intake and sociodemographic and health-related characteristics. The multistage stratified cluster design in the 1990 Ontario Health Survey was used. There were 5,194 subjects, 12 to 18 years of age, in sampled households. Dietary data were collected via a food frequency questionnaire. Low-carbohydrate-density diets were consumed by 27.6% of males and 24.1% of females. Low-carbohydrate-density diets were related (P
PubMed ID
16256764 View in PubMed
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Alberta Nutrition Guidelines for Children and Youth: awareness and use in schools.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131582
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2011;72(3):137-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Shauna M Downs
Anna Farmer
Maira Quintanilha
Tanya R Berry
Diana R Mager
Noreen D Willows
Linda J McCargar
Author Affiliation
Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, Faculty of Agricultural, Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2011;72(3):137-40
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alberta
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - standards
Food Services
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Guidelines as Topic
Health promotion
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Nutritional Status
Questionnaires
Schools
Social Environment
Abstract
In June 2008, the Alberta government released the Alberta Nutrition Guidelines for Children and Youth. We evaluated the awareness of and intent to use the guidelines in Alberta schools, and sought to determine whether organizational characteristics were a factor in adoption of the guidelines.
Randomly selected schools from across Alberta completed a 19-question telephone survey, which included open- and closed-ended questions about the schools' characteristics, the priority given to healthy eating, awareness of the guidelines, and the schools' intent to use the guidelines. Of the 554 schools contacted, 357 (64%) completed the survey.
Overall, 76.1% of schools were aware of the guidelines and 65% were in the process of adopting them. Fifty percent of schools identified healthy eating as a high priority and 65.9% reported making changes to improve the nutritional quality of foods offered in the past year. Schools that were larger, public, and urban, and had a school champion and healthy eating as a high priority were more likely to be adopting the guidelines.
Most schools were aware of the nutrition guidelines and many had begun the adoption process. Identifying a school champion may be an important first step for schools in terms of adopting health promotion initiatives.
PubMed ID
21896251 View in PubMed
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Analysis of 24-hour recalls of 164 fourth- to sixth-grade Mohawk children in Kahnawake.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205123
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 1998 Jul;98(7):814-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1998

Arctic indigenous women consume greater than acceptable levels of organochlorines.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4881
Source
J Nutr. 1995 Oct;125(10):2501-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1995
Author
H V Kuhnlein
O. Receveur
D C Muir
H M Chan
R. Soueida
Author Affiliation
Centre for Nutrition and the Environment of Indigenous Peoples (CINE), McGill University, Ste. Anne de Bellevue, Quebec.
Source
J Nutr. 1995 Oct;125(10):2501-10
Date
Oct-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Animals
Arctic Regions
Canada
Chlorobenzenes - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analysis
Comparative Study
Dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analysis
Dieldrin - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analysis
Diet - standards
Environmental Exposure
Ethnic Groups
Female
Fruit - chemistry
Humans
Insecticides - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analysis
Interviews
Lindane - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analysis
Meat - analysis
Middle Aged
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Seals, Earless
Toxaphene - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analysis
Abstract
Exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides through traditional food resources was examined for Arctic Indigenous women living in two cultural and environmental areas of the Canadian Arctic--one community representing Baffin Island Inuit in eastern Arctic and two communities representing Sahtú Dene/Métis in western Arctic. Polychlorinated biphenyls, toxaphene, chlorobenzenes, hexachlorocyclohexanes, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, chlordane-related compounds and dieldrin were determined in local food resources as normally prepared and eaten. Quantified dietary recalls taken seasonally reflected normal consumption patterns of these food resources by women in three age groups: 20-40 y, 41-60 y and > or = 61 y. There was wide variation of intake of all organochlorine contaminants in both areas and among age groups for the Sahtú. Fifty percent of the intake recalls collected from the Baffin Inuit exceeded the acceptable daily intake for chlordane-related compounds and toxaphene, and a substantial percentage of the intake records for dieldrin and polychlorinated biphenyls exceeded the acceptable or tolerable daily intake levels. Primary contributing foods to organochlorine contaminants intake for the Baffin Inuit were meat and blubber of ringed seal, blubber of walrus and mattak and blubber of narwal. Important foods contributing organochlorine contaminant to the Sahtú Dene/Métis were caribou, whitefish, inconnu, trout and duck. The superior nutritional benefits and potential health risks of traditional food items are reviewed, as are implications for monitoring organochlorine contaminant contents of food, clinical symptoms and food use.
PubMed ID
7562084 View in PubMed
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Are snacking patterns associated with risk of overweight among Kahnawake schoolchildren?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149332
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2010 Feb;13(2):163-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Genevieve Mercille
Olivier Receveur
Ann C Macaulay
Author Affiliation
Ecole de santé publique, Université de Montréal, PO Box 6128, Downtown Station, Montréal, Québec, Canada, H3C 3J7. genevieve.mercille.1@umontreal.ca
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2010 Feb;13(2):163-71
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Analysis of Variance
Body mass index
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Child Nutrition Sciences - education
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Choice Behavior
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - standards
Diet Surveys
Energy Intake - physiology
Feeding Behavior
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Nutritional Requirements
Overweight - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology
Prevalence
Quebec
Risk factors
Abstract
To understand more specifically how the quality, quantity and frequency of snack food consumption differs in different BMI categories.
Four hundred and forty-nine school-aged children (grade 4-6) from a Kanien'kehaka (Mohawk) community provided a 24 h recall and their height and weight in 1994, 1998 and 2002, in three independent cross-sectional samples. Food consumed between two consecutive meals was defined as a snacking occasion. ANOVA and chi2 tests were used to compare food choices between BMI categories according to food quality criteria and food groups in 2006. Logistic regression models were performed to compare results between normal-weight children and those at risk of overweight and between normal-weight and overweight children.
Energy intake from snacks tended to be higher for children at risk of overweight, compared with the other two BMI categories. Food groups with a higher energy density were also consumed more frequently by these children, with larger average portions of cereal bars (P
PubMed ID
19650958 View in PubMed
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[Assessment of diet of students from Orenburg region].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173641
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2005;74(3):14-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
S V Notova
M G Skal'naia
O V Baranova
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2005;74(3):14-7
Date
2005
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Avitaminosis - etiology
Carbohydrates - deficiency
Diet - standards
Diet Surveys
Dietary Carbohydrates - standards
Dietary Proteins - standards
Female
Humans
Male
Protein Deficiency - etiology
Russia
Students
Trace Elements - deficiency - standards
Vitamins - standards
Abstract
The article this research is devoted to the Orenburg student youth diet. The revealed deficiency of major nutrients (protein, fats and especially carbohydrates), as vitamins (C, PP, E, D, B groups) and analysis of diet ration concerning basis nourishing components, vitamins, macro- micro elements (Zn, Cu, I, Cr, Se).
PubMed ID
16044835 View in PubMed
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184 records – page 1 of 19.