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Adequacy of nutrient intake among elderly persons receiving home care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154657
Source
J Nutr Elder. 2008;27(1-2):65-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
C Shanthi Johnson
Monirun Nessa Begum
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Kinesiology and Health Studies, University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. shanthi.johnson@uregina.ca
Source
J Nutr Elder. 2008;27(1-2):65-82
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Diet - methods - statistics & numerical data
Eating
Female
Frail Elderly - statistics & numerical data
Geriatric Assessment - methods - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Home Care Services - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Nutrition Assessment
Nutritional Status
Ontario
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Abstract
This study examines the adequacy of the dietary intake based on age, sex, and level of nutritional risk among 98 frail elderly persons receiving home care through Community Care Access Centres. The dietary intakes were measured using 24-hour recalls and were compared with the dietary reference intake. The participants' intakes of both macronutrients and micronutrients were found to be inadequate. On average, elderly persons were consuming more than the recommended amount of protein, but the average intakes of many vitamins and minerals were less than optimal based on the average intakes. Paradoxically, more than half of elderly participants were overweight or obese. The results highlight the need for appropriate nutrition, education, and support for elderly persons receiving home care.
PubMed ID
18928191 View in PubMed
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Adherence to special diets and its association with meeting the nutrient recommendations in individuals with type 1 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294978
Source
Acta Diabetol. 2018 Aug; 55(8):843-851
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2018
Author
A J Ahola
C Forsblom
Per-Henrik Groop
Author Affiliation
Folkhälsan Institute of Genetics, Folkhälsan Research Center, University of Helsinki, Biomedicum Helsinki C318b, PO Box 63, 00014, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Diabetol. 2018 Aug; 55(8):843-851
Date
Aug-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - diet therapy - epidemiology
Diet - methods - statistics & numerical data
Diet Records
Diet, Diabetic - standards - statistics & numerical data
Energy Intake - physiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Policy
Nutrition Surveys
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Not much is known about adherence to special diets in type 1 diabetes, characteristics of individuals with special diets, and whether such practices should raise concerns with respect to meeting the dietary recommendations. In this study, we assessed the frequencies of adherence to special diets, in a population of individuals with type 1 diabetes, and investigated the association between special diet adherence and dietary intake, measured as dietary patterns and nutrient intakes.
During the Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy Study visit, participants with type 1 diabetes (n?=?1429) were instructed to complete a diet questionnaire inquiring about the adherence to special diets. The participants also completed a food record, from which energy and nutrient intakes were calculated.
In all, 36.6% participants reported adhering to some special diet. Most commonly reported special diets were lactose-free (17.1%), protein restriction (10.0%), vegetarian (7.0%), and gluten-free (5.6%) diet. Special diet adherents were more frequently women, older, had longer diabetes duration, and more frequently had various diabetes complications. Mean carbohydrate intakes were close to the lower levels of the recommendation in all diet groups, which was reflected in low mean fibre intakes but high frequencies of meeting the sucrose recommendations. The recommendation for saturated fatty acid intake was frequently unmet, with the highest frequencies observed in vegetarians. Of the micronutrients, vitamin D, folate, and iron recommendations were most frequently unmet, with some differences between the diet groups.
Special diets are frequently followed by individuals with type 1 diabetes. The adherents are more frequently women, and have longer diabetes duration and more diabetes complications. Achieving the dietary recommendations differed between diets, and depended on the nutrient in question. Overall, intakes of fibre, vitamin D, folate, and iron fell short of the recommendations.
PubMed ID
29777369 View in PubMed
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Can the accuracy of health behaviour surveys be improved by non-response follow-ups?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270529
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2015 Jun;25(3):487-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Satu Helakorpi
Pia Mäkelä
Ansku Holstila
Antti Uutela
Erkki Vartiainen
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2015 Jun;25(3):487-90
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Body mass index
Diet - methods - statistics & numerical data
Exercise
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Health Behavior
Health status
Health Surveys - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Physical Fitness
Postal Service
Reproducibility of Results
Smoking - epidemiology
Surveys and Questionnaires - standards
Young Adult
Abstract
Prevalence estimates may be biased if the characteristics of respondents differ from those of non-respondents in surveys. In this study, we used a follow-up telephone interview of initial non-respondents to examine the differences--in terms of self-rated health and health behaviours--to initial postal respondents and to assess improvements in prevalence estimates.
Following a postal questionnaire survey using a random sample (n = 5000) of the Finnish working-age population with a response rate of 57% (n = 2826), a follow-up telephone survey was performed based on 1261 non-respondents (response rate 56%, n = 708) in 2010. Prevalence of smoking, alcohol use, body mass index, physical activity, self-rated fitness, dietary habits and self-rated health were calculated for the survey population with and without a telephone interview. Logistic regression models were used to examine differences in health behaviours and health between the initial postal questionnaire respondents and follow-up telephone interview respondents.
The total response rate increased from 57% to 71% when the telephone respondents were included. The telephone survey indicated that both male and female telephone respondents were more often smokers, and female telephone respondents were more often heavy episodic drinkers and less often reported poor self-rated fitness than postal respondents. Nonetheless, the prevalence rates of outcome variables did not change significantly when telephone respondents were included.
The response rate of surveys can be increased by using a telephone survey in follow-up contacts with non-respondents. As non-respondents differ from respondents, this contributes to an improvement--although small--in internal validity.
PubMed ID
25477127 View in PubMed
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Changes in diet through adolescence and early adulthood: longitudinal trajectories and association with key life transitions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297382
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2018 09 10; 15(1):86
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-10-2018
Author
Eleanor M Winpenny
Esther M F van Sluijs
Martin White
Knut-Inge Klepp
Bente Wold
Nanna Lien
Author Affiliation
Centre for Diet and Activity Research & MRC Epidemiology Unit, School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. ew470@cam.ac.uk.
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2018 09 10; 15(1):86
Date
09-10-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adult
Diet - methods - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Change Events
Life Style
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway
Obesity
Weight Gain
Young Adult
Abstract
Early adulthood is a period associated with poor diet and rapid weight gain. This is also an age of transition, including environmental, social and lifestyle changes which may be associated with changes in diet. We assess longitudinal associations between four early adulthood life transitions (leaving home, leaving education, entering employment, and cohabitation) and changes in consumption of fruit, vegetables, confectionery and sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs).
Participants (n?=?1100) from the Norwegian Longitudinal Health Behaviour Study, reported data on diet and life transitions on up to eight occasions from age 14 to age 30. Diet data were self-reported in response to questions on intake of fruit, vegetables, confectionery and sugar-sweetened beverages. Growth models were developed to describe changing intake of each of the four diet indicators with age. Fixed-effects regression models assessed associations between the four life transitions and within-individual changes in diet indicators, with adjustment for the remaining transitions and parenthood.
Diet indicators showed quadratic trajectories with age: fruit and vegetable intakes declined from age 14 to ages 23 and 21 respectively, before increasing to age 30. SSB and confectionery intakes increased to age 18, before subsequently decreasing. Leaving the parental home was associated with a decrease in fruit intake of -?0.54 times/week (95% confidence interval (95%CI): -0.87;-0.22) and vegetable intake of -?0.43 times/week (95%CI: -0.70;-0.15). Leaving education was associated with increases in confectionery (0.33 times/week (95%CI: 0.04;0.62)) and SSB intakes (0.49 times/week (95%CI: 0.10;0.87).
Leaving home and leaving education are associated with negative changes in diet and may present opportunities for effective diet and obesity intervention. Further study of these transitions is needed to understand the mechanisms mediating associations between life transitions and changes in diet.
PubMed ID
30200990 View in PubMed
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Dairy intake revisited - associations between dairy intake and lifestyle related cardio-metabolic risk factors in a high milk consuming population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300924
Source
Nutr J. 2018 11 22; 17(1):110
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
11-22-2018
Author
Ingegerd Johansson
Lena Maria Nilsson
Anders Esberg
Jan-Håkan Jansson
Anna Winkvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Research, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. ingegerd.johansson@umu.se.
Source
Nutr J. 2018 11 22; 17(1):110
Date
11-22-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Blood glucose
Blood Pressure - physiology
Body mass index
Cholesterol - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dairy Products
Diet - methods - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Life Style
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Milk - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sweden
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
The association between milk and dairy intake and the incidence of cardiometabolic diseases, cancer and mortality has been evaluated in many studies, but these studies have had conflicting results with no clear conclusion on causal or confounding associations. The present study aims to further address this association by cross-sectional and longitudinal evaluation of the associations between exposure to various types of dairy products and metabolic risk markers among inhabitants in northern Sweden while taking other lifestyle factors into account.
Respondents in the Västerbotten Intervention Programme with complete and plausible diet data between 1991 and 2016 were included, yielding 124,934 observations from 90,512 unique subjects. For longitudinal analysis, 27,682 participants with a visit 8-12?years after the first visit were identified. All participants completed a validated Food Frequency Questionnaire. Metabolic risk markers, including body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, serum (S) cholesterol and triglycerides, and blood glucose, were measured. Participants were categorized into quintiles by intake of dairy products, and risk (odds ratios, OR) of undesirable levels of metabolic risk markers was assessed in multivariable logistic regression analyses. In longitudinal analyses, intake quintiles were related to desirable levels of metabolic risk markers at both visits or deterioration at follow-up using Cox regression analyses.
The OR of being classified with an undesirable BMI decreased with increasing quintiles of total dairy, cheese and butter intake but increased with increasing non-fermented milk intake. The OR of being classified with an undesirable S-cholesterol level increased with increasing intake of total dairy, butter and high fat (3%) non-fermented milk, whereas an undesirable S-triglyceride level was inversely associated with cheese and butter intake in women. In longitudinal analyses, increasing butter intake was associated with deterioration of S-cholesterol and blood glucose levels, whereas increasing cheese intake was associated with a lower risk of deterioration of S-triglycerides.
Confounding factors likely contribute to the demonstrated association between dairy intake and mortality, and other medical conditions and analyses should be stratified by dairy type.
PubMed ID
30466440 View in PubMed
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Dietary predictors and plasma concentrations of perfluorinated compounds in a coastal population from northern Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145757
Source
J Environ Public Health. 2009;2009:268219
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Charlotta Rylander
Magritt Brustad
Helena Falk
Torkjel M Sandanger
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, 9037 Tromsø, Norway. charlotta.rylander@uit.no
Source
J Environ Public Health. 2009;2009:268219
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Alkanesulfonic Acids - blood
Body mass index
Caprylates - blood
Diet - methods - statistics & numerical data
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Female
Fluorocarbons - blood
Food Contamination - statistics & numerical data
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Fluorinated - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Questionnaires
Seafood
Sex Distribution
Sulfonic Acids - blood
Vegetables
Water Pollutants, Chemical - blood
Abstract
Dietary intake, age, gender, and body mass index were investigated as possible predictors of perfluorinated compounds in a study population from northern Norway (44 women and 16 men). In addition to donating a blood sample, the participants answered a detailed questionnaire about diet and lifestyle. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) (29 ng/mL), perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) (3.9 ng/mL), perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS) (0.5 ng/mL), perfluorononanoate (PFNA) (0.8 ng/mL), and perfluoroheptane sulfonate (PFHpS) (1.1 ng/mL) were detected in more than 95% of all samples. Of the dietary items investigated, fruit and vegetables significantly reduced the concentrations of PFOS and PFHpS, whereas fatty fish to a smaller extent significantly increased the levels of the same compounds. Men had significantly higher concentrations of PFOS, PFOA, PFHxS, and PFHpS than women. There were significant differences in PFOS isomer pattern between genders, with women having the largest proportion of linear PFOS. PFOS, PFHxS, and PFHpS concentrations also increased with age.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20111729 View in PubMed
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The effect of a very high daily plant stanol ester intake on serum lipids, carotenoids, and fat-soluble vitamins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148899
Source
Clin Nutr. 2010 Feb;29(1):112-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Helena Gylling
Maarit Hallikainen
Markku J Nissinen
Tatu A Miettinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Nutrition, University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland. helena.gylling@uku.fi
Source
Clin Nutr. 2010 Feb;29(1):112-8
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
Carotenoids - blood
Cholesterol - blood
Diet - methods - statistics & numerical data
Double-Blind Method
Female
Finland
Humans
Hypercholesterolemia - blood - diet therapy
Hypolipidemic Agents - administration & dosage - blood - pharmacology
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Sitosterols - administration & dosage - blood - pharmacology
Vitamin A - blood
Vitamin D - blood
Vitamins - blood
Young Adult
alpha-Tocopherol - blood
beta Carotene - blood
Abstract
Intake of 2-3 g/d of plant stanols as esters lowers LDL cholesterol level, but there is no information about the efficacy and safety of a respective very high daily intake. We studied the effects of 8.8 g/d of plant stanols as esters on serum lipids and safety variables in subjects with mild to moderate hypercholesterolemia.
In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study the intervention (n=25) and control (n=24) groups consumed spread and drink enriched or not with plant stanol esters for 10 weeks.
Plant stanols reduced serum total and LDL cholesterol concentrations by 12.8 and 17.3% from baseline and by 12.0 and 17.1% from controls (P
PubMed ID
19709787 View in PubMed
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Factors influencing the dietary response to a nutritional intervention promoting the Mediterranean food pattern in healthy women from the Quebec City metropolitan area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166292
Source
Health Educ Res. 2007 Oct;22(5):718-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Julie Goulet
Benoît Lamarche
Simone Lemieux
Author Affiliation
Institute of Nutraceuticals and Functional Foods, 2440 Hochelaga Blvd, Laval University, Québec, Québec G1K 7P4, Canada.
Source
Health Educ Res. 2007 Oct;22(5):718-26
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diet - methods - statistics & numerical data
Diet, Mediterranean - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Quebec
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of sociodemographic characteristics and baseline food habits on the dietary response to a nutritional intervention promoting the Mediterranean food pattern and maintenance of dietary modifications in 73 healthy women. The 12-week nutritional intervention in free-living conditions consisted of two group courses and seven individual sessions with a dietitian. A follow-up visit was performed 12 weeks after the end of the intervention (week 24). A Mediterranean dietary score was derived from a food frequency questionnaire, administered at 0, 6, 12 and 24 weeks. Marital status, socioeconomic level, educational level and household size did not seem to influence the dietary response, whereas women without children followed more closely dietary advice than women with children (OR, 3.6; 95% CI, 1.3-10.0). Planning food purchases in function of weekly discounts was also associated with better dietary response to the intervention (OR, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.3-8.8). Nutritional intervention promoting the Mediterranean food pattern was effective in modifying food habits of healthy women. The fact of having children or not and food purchase habits seem to influence the response to a nutritional intervention promoting the Mediterranean food pattern.
PubMed ID
17138615 View in PubMed
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Revised infant dietary recommendations: the impact of maternal education and other parental factors on adherence rates in Iceland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119142
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2013 Feb;102(2):143-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Asa Vala Thorisdottir
Ingibjorg Gunnarsdottir
Inga Thorsdottir
Author Affiliation
Unit for Nutrition Research, Faculty of Food Science and Nutrition, School of Health Sciences, University of Iceland & Landspítali - The National University Hospital of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. asavala@landspitali.is
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2013 Feb;102(2):143-8
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Body mass index
Breast Feeding - statistics & numerical data
Diet - methods - statistics & numerical data
Diet Surveys
Educational Status
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Iceland
Infant
Infant Care - methods - statistics & numerical data
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal Behavior
Milk
Nutrition Policy
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Postnatal Care
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Revised infant dietary recommendations from the Icelandic Nutrition Council (Nutrition: the first twelve months. Reykjav?k, Iceland: The Icelandic Nutrition Council, 2003) are outlined in a booklet provided during free postnatal care. These focus on increasing the duration of exclusive and total breastfeeding and reducing cow's milk consumption. This study explored whether maternal education and other parental factors affected whether mothers followed the recommendations.
Mothers of randomly selected healthy infants (n = 200) completed questionnaires on body mass index (BMI), age, education (basic, medium and higher), household income, smoking and parental factors. Dietary data were collected during home visits by a researcher (0-4 months) and through monthly food records completed by parents or caregivers (5-12 months).
Each maternal education level increased breastfeeding duration by 0.72 months (95% CI = 0.04, 1.39) and reduced cow's milk consumption by 36.7 mL/day (95% CI = -70.11, -3.03), when adjusted for maternal BMI, age, smoking and family income. Maternal education was not associated with duration of exclusive breastfeeding. Duration of exclusive and total breastfeeding was inversely associated with maternal BMI, B = -0.10 (95% CI = -0.16, -0.05) and -0.13 (95% CI = -0.23, -0.03), respectively.
Mothers with higher education appear to have adapted more easily to the revised recommendations on infant diet, particularly when their infants are 6-12 months old. Higher maternal BMI was associated with shorter duration of both exclusive and total breastfeeding.
PubMed ID
23134449 View in PubMed
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Understanding the propensity of consumers to comply with dietary guidelines directed at heart health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148471
Source
Appetite. 2010 Feb;54(1):52-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Spencer Henson
Jose Blandon
John Cranfield
Deepananda Herath
Author Affiliation
Department of Food, Agricultural and Resource Economics, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G2W1, Canada.
Source
Appetite. 2010 Feb;54(1):52-61
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Health
Comprehension - physiology
Diet - methods - statistics & numerical data
Educational Status
Female
Health Behavior
Health Promotion - methods
Heart Diseases - prevention & control
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Policy
Ontario
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this paper is to explore the difficulty faced by consumers in complying with health-related dietary guidelines, focusing on those guidelines that consumers find it more/less difficult to meet and the factors driving the ability to make associated dietary changes. Participants reported self-assessed compliance with 12 dietary recommendations predominantly directed at reducing the risk of heart disease. The difficulty of complying with each of the dietary guidelines was measured using a Rasch model, while the determinants of ability to comply with the dietary recommendations as a whole were identified using regression analysis. The more difficult dietary recommendations included limiting consumption of red meats and consuming the recommended daily intake of fruits and vegetables. Attitudinal variables associated with food, nutrition and health, perception of cholesterol risk and a range of socio-demographic variables, including age, gender and education, were significant determinants of person ability to comply with the dietary recommendations. The results show that there are significant differences in the difficulty faced by consumers in complying with particular dietary recommendations, while there is substantial variation in the ability to eat a healthy diet across participants.
PubMed ID
19765624 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.