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Adherence to a Healthy Nordic Food Index Is Associated with a Lower Risk of Type-2 Diabetes--The Danish Diet, Cancer and Health Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273886
Source
Nutrients. 2015 Oct;7(10):8633-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Sandra Amalie Lacoppidan
Cecilie Kyrø
Steffen Loft
Anne Helnæs
Jane Christensen
Camilla Plambeck Hansen
Christina Catherine Dahm
Kim Overvad
Anne Tjønneland
Anja Olsen
Source
Nutrients. 2015 Oct;7(10):8633-44
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - prevention & control
Diet - ethnology - standards
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Abstract
Type-2 diabetes (T2D) prevalence is rapidly increasing worldwide. Lifestyle factors, in particular obesity, diet, and physical activity play a significant role in the etiology of the disease. Of dietary patterns, particularly the Mediterranean diet has been studied, and generally a protective association has been identified. However, other regional diets are less explored.
The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between adherence to a healthy Nordic food index and the risk of T2D. The index consists of six food items: fish, cabbage, rye bread, oatmeal, apples and pears, and root vegetables.
Data was obtained from a prospective cohort study of 57,053 Danish men and women aged 50-64 years, at baseline, of whom 7366 developed T2D (median follow-up: 15.3 years). The Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess the association between the healthy Nordic food index and risk of T2D, adjusted for potential confounders.
Greater adherence to the healthy Nordic food index was significantly associated with lower risk of T2D after adjusting for potential confounders. An index score of 5-6 points (high adherence) was associated with a statistically significantly 25% lower T2D risk in women (HR: 0.75, 95%CI: 0.61-0.92) and 38% in men (HR: 0.62; 95%CI: 0.53-0.71) compared to those with an index score of 0 points (poor adherence).
Adherence to a healthy Nordic food index was found to be inversely associated with risk of T2D, suggesting that regional diets other than the Mediterranean may also be recommended for prevention of T2D.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26506373 View in PubMed
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Adherence to a traditional lifestyle affects food and nutrient intake among modern Swedish Sami.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147344
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Sep;68(4):372-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
  1 document  
Author
Alastair B Ross
Asa Johansson
Veronika Vavruch-Nilsson
Sven Hassler
Per Sjölander
Anette Edin-Liljegren
Ulf Gyllensten
Author Affiliation
Department of Genetics and Pathology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. Alastair.Ross@rdls.nestle.com
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Sep;68(4):372-85
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
372451
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - ethnology
Energy intake
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritive Value
Population Groups
Sweden
Abstract
To compare the nutrient and food intake of Sami still engaged in reindeer herding (traditional lifestyle or reindeer-herding Sami [RS]) and Sami not involved in reindeer herding (industrialized lifestyle or non-reindeer-herding Sami [NRS]) with other northern Swedish populations.
Cross-sectional analysis of data from a prospective cardiovascular intervention program in northern Sweden.
Data were used from a prospective cardiovascular intervention program in northern Sweden. Sami recruited into this study were divided according to whether they were involved in reindeer herding (traditional lifestyle, RS) (66 females, 79 males) or not (NRS) (255 females, 195 males), and compared to non-Sami from the same area taking part in the same study (controls) (499 females, 501 males). Subjects completed a Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) and clinical parameters were analysed.
RS had a higher overall intake of energy for both females (P
PubMed ID
19917189 View in PubMed
Documents
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Assessing dietary intake in a population undergoing a rapid transition in diet and lifestyle: the Arctic Inuit in Nunavut, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147869
Source
Br J Nutr. 2010 Mar;103(5):749-59
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Sangita Sharma
Xia Cao
Cindy Roache
Annie Buchan
Rhonda Reid
Joel Gittelsohn
Author Affiliation
Epidemiology Program, Cancer Research Center of Hawaii, University of Hawaii, 1236 Lauhala Street, Honolulu, HI 96813, USA. sangita_sharma@unc.edu
Source
Br J Nutr. 2010 Mar;103(5):749-59
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Arctic Regions
Canada
Cultural Competency
Diet - ethnology - standards
Diet Records
Diet Surveys
Energy Intake - ethnology
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Humans
Inuits
Life Style - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Pilot Projects
Questionnaires
Abstract
The aims of the present study were to (1) characterise the diets of adult Inuit; (2) highlight foods for a nutritional and lifestyle intervention programme; (3) develop a quantitative FFQ (QFFQ) to evaluate the programme and monitor changes in dietary intake in this population over time. A dietary survey using single 24-h dietary recalls was conducted among Inuit aged between 19 and 87 years in two communities in Nunavut, Canada. Eighty-seven subjects completed the recalls (response rate was approximately 73 %). The mean energy intake for men and women was 9530 and 6939 kJ, respectively. The intakes of dietary fibre and the majority of vitamins and minerals (especially vitamins A, D, and E, total folate and Ca) were far below the recommendations. Traditional foods contributed 40 and 42 %, respectively, to protein and Fe intakes. Non-nutrient-dense store-bought foods were consumed much more frequently than the nutrient-dense traditional foods. Foods high in fat and sugar were highlighted, and will be replaced by healthier, more nutrient-dense alternatives to address the dietary inadequacies for the nutritional intervention programme. A 154-item QFFQ was developed and pilot tested in the Arctic Inuit. The present study highlighted foods to be targeted for a nutritional and lifestyle intervention programme not previously undertaken in this population. This QFFQ is culturally appropriate and specific for evaluating the effectiveness of the programme, as well as monitoring nutritional transition in this population.
PubMed ID
19840421 View in PubMed
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Assessment of dietary adequacy in a remote Inuvialuit population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138238
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:35-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
E. Erber
B N Hopping
L. Beck
T. Sheehy
E. De Roose
S. Sharma
Author Affiliation
Nutrition Research Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Kannapolis, NC, USA.
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:35-42
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chronic Disease - ethnology
Diet - ethnology
Dietary Fiber
Eating - ethnology
Energy Intake - ethnology
Female
Humans
Inuits - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Northwest Territories - epidemiology
Nutritional Requirements
Questionnaires
Vitamins
Young Adult
Abstract
Traditional foods are rich sources of essential nutrients, but Inuvialuit in the Northwest Territories (NWT), Canada, have been undergoing a nutrition transition, characterised by an increased consumption of non-nutrient-dense foods. The present study aimed to characterise energy, nutrient and food intakes amongst adult Inuvialuit.
The study collected up to three 24-h dietary recalls on nonconsecutive days for each participant in spring/summer of 2008 in one remote community in the NWT. Recall data were analysed for energy and nutrient intake, dietary adequacy, most commonly reported foods, and food contributors to energy and nutrients.
Participants included 14 men and 50 women (response rate 79%). Median daily energy intake was 9.4 (interquartile range=5.7) MJ for men and 8.3 (3.6) MJ for women. The majority of adult Inuvialuit did not meet the recommendation for vitamins A [median intake=344.7 (246.3) ?g-RAE in men, 248.9 (213.8) ?g-RAE in women], B(6) [0.9 (0.8) mg in men, 1.0 (0.5) mg in women] and E [2.4 (2.1) mg in men, 1.8 (1.0) mg in women], dietary fibre [7.7 (5.7) g in men, 8.7 (4.4) g in women], calcium [779.6 (842.0) mg in men, 610.4 (431.5) mg in women] and total folate [222.6 (57.7) ?g in men, 264.6 (127.5) ?g in women]. Vitamin D intake was below the recommendation for most women [median intake=100.0 (119.2) IU]. Traditional foods contributed substantially to protein and iron intake. Juices were the main contributors to energy, carbohydrate and calcium.
The present study revealed an inadequate consumption of essential nutrients in an Inuvialuit population. If these nutrient deficiencies continue, this population will face an increased burden of chronic diseases and malnutrition.
PubMed ID
21158960 View in PubMed
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Associations between sociocultural home environmental factors and vegetable consumption among Norwegian 3-5-year olds: BRA-study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291600
Source
Appetite. 2017 Oct 01; 117:310-320
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-01-2017
Author
Anne Lene Kristiansen
Mona Bjelland
Anne Himberg-Sundet
Nanna Lien
Lene Frost Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo, PO Box 1046 Blindern, 0316 Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: a.l.kristiansen@medisin.uio.no.
Source
Appetite. 2017 Oct 01; 117:310-320
Date
Oct-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena - ethnology
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Family Characteristics - ethnology
Female
Fruit
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice - ethnology
Healthy Diet - ethnology
Humans
Male
Norway
Nutrition Surveys
Parenting - ethnology
Parents
Patient Compliance - ethnology
Principal Component Analysis
Self Report
Socioeconomic Factors
Vegetables
Abstract
The home environment is the first environment to shape childhood dietary habits and food preferences, hence greater understanding of home environmental factors associated with vegetable consumption among young children is needed. The objective has been to examine questionnaire items developed to measure the sociocultural home environment of children focusing on vegetables and to assess the psychometric properties of the resulting factors. Further, to explore associations between the environmental factors and vegetable consumption among Norwegian 3-5 year olds. Parents (n 633) were invited to participate and filled in a questionnaire assessing the child's vegetable intake and factors potentially influencing this, along with a 24-h recall of their child's fruit and vegetable intake. Children's fruit and vegetable intakes at two meals in one day in the kindergarten were observed by researchers. Principal components analysis was used to examine items assessing the sociocultural home environment. Encouragement items resulted in factors labelled "reactive encouragement", "child involvement" and "reward". Modelling items resulted in the factors labelled "active role model" and "practical role model". Items assessing negative parental attitudes resulted in the factor labelled "negative parental attitudes" and items assessing family pressure/demand resulted in the factor labelled "family demand". The psychometric properties of the factors were for most satisfactory. Linear regression of the associations between vegetable intake and the factors showed, as expected, generally positive associations with "child involvement", "practical role model" and "family demand", and negative associations with "negative parental attitudes" and "reward". Unexpectedly, "reactive encouragement" was negatively associated with vegetable consumption. In conclusion, associations between sociocultural home environmental factors and children's vegetable consumption showed both expected and unexpected associations some of which differed by maternal education - pointing to a need for further comparable studies.
PubMed ID
28676449 View in PubMed
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Awareness of chronic disease diagnosis amongst family members is associated with healthy dietary knowledge but not behaviour amongst Inuit in Arctic Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138230
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:100-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
M. Pakseresht
E. Mead
J. Gittelsohn
C. Roache
S. Sharma
Author Affiliation
Nutrition Research Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Kannapolis, NC, USA.
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:100-9
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chronic Disease - ethnology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - ethnology
Eating - ethnology
Energy Intake - ethnology
Family
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health promotion
Heart Diseases - ethnology
Humans
Hypertension - ethnology
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Nunavut - epidemiology
Patient Education as Topic
Questionnaires
Self Efficacy
Self Report
Young Adult
Abstract
The extent to which awareness of chronic disease (CD) diagnosis affects one's healthy food knowledge, self-efficacy and intentions or healthy dietary and physical activity (PA) behaviours remains unexplored among Inuit in Canada.
A food frequency questionnaire and an adult impact questionnaire were used in a cross-sectional study to collect self-reported data on daily energy and nutrient intake, PA and the diagnosis of hypertension, diabetes, heart disease and cancer amongst adult Inuit and their family members. Associations between awareness of personal and family CD status and healthy food knowledge, self-efficacy and intentions, percentage of energy consumed from non-nutrient-dense foods and PA were assessed via ordinal logistic regression.
Of the 266 participants, those who self-reported CD for both themselves and their relative(s) were more likely to have high healthy food knowledge [odds ratio (OR)=2.45] than those who did not. Reporting hypertension and heart disease amongst only relatives increased the likelihood of high knowledge (OR=5.20) and intentions (OR=5.10) for healthy eating. Heart disease in both participants and their relatives was associated with high levels of PA (OR=12.24). However, there were no associations when only participants (but not their relatives) reported having CD. A joint effect between a high level of education and awareness of CD was positively related to high food knowledge (OR=38.93). An inverse association between awareness of CD and unhealthy eating was not observed.
Awareness of a relative having a CD was a more important factor in increasing knowledge and, to a lesser degree, self-efficacy or intentions to eat healthy than participants' awareness of personal CD. However, awareness was not associated with lower non-nutrient-dense food intake.
PubMed ID
21158968 View in PubMed
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Being a 'good mother': Dietary governmentality in the family food practices of three ethnocultural groups in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141189
Source
Health (London). 2010 Sep;14(5):467-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Svetlana Ristovski-Slijepcevic
Gwen E Chapman
Brenda L Beagan
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia and BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC, Canada. sslijepcevic@bccancer.bc.ca
Source
Health (London). 2010 Sep;14(5):467-83
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
African Continental Ancestry Group
Aged
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Canada
Cultural Characteristics
Diet - ethnology
Ethnic Groups - psychology
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Guidelines as Topic
Health education
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mothers - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
In this qualitative study with three ethnocultural groups in two regions of Canada, we explore how official dietary guidelines provide particular standards concerning 'healthy eating' that marginalize other understandings of the relationship between food and health. In families where parents and youth held shared ways of understanding healthy eating, the role of 'good mother' was constructed so as to include healthy eating expertise. Mothers expressed a perceived need to be personally responsible for providing skills and knowledge about healthy eating as well as guarding children against negative nutritional influences. Governing of family eating practices to conform to official nutritional advice occurred through information provision, monitoring in shopping and meal preparation, restricting and guiding food purchases, and directly translating expert knowledges into family food practices. In families where parents and youth held differing understandings of healthy eating, primarily families from ethnocultural minority groups, mothers often did not employ the particular western-originating strategies of conveying healthy eating information, or mentoring healthy meal preparation, nor did they regulate or restrict children's food consumption. Western dietary guidelines entered into the family primarily through the youth, emphasizing the nutritional properties of food, often devaluing 'traditional' knowledge about healthy eating. These processes exemplify techniques of governmentality which simultaneously exercise control over people's behaviour through normalizing some family food practices and marginalizing others.
PubMed ID
20801995 View in PubMed
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Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios predict intake of sweeteners in a Yup'ik study population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117895
Source
J Nutr. 2013 Feb;143(2):161-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Sarah H Nash
Alan R Kristal
Andrea Bersamin
Scarlett E Hopkins
Bert B Boyer
Diane M O'Brien
Author Affiliation
Center for Alaska Native Health Research, Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska-Fairbanks, AK, USA. shnash@alaska.edu
Source
J Nutr. 2013 Feb;143(2):161-5
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alaska
Beverages - analysis
Biological Markers - blood
Carbon Isotopes
Diet - ethnology
Erythrocytes - metabolism
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Biological
Nitrogen Isotopes
Nutrition Assessment
Sweetening Agents - administration & dosage - analysis
Young Adult
Abstract
The carbon isotope ratio (d¹³C) is elevated in corn- and cane sugar-based foods and has recently shown associations with sweetener intake in multiple U.S. populations. However, a high carbon isotope ratio is not specific to corn- and sugar cane-based sweeteners, as other foods, including meats and fish, also have elevated d¹³C. This study examines whether the inclusion of a second marker, the nitrogen isotope ratio (d¹5N), can control for confounding dietary effects on d¹³C and improve the validity of isotopic markers of sweetener intake. The study participants are from the Yup'ik population of southwest Alaska and consume large and variable amounts of fish and marine mammals known to have elevated carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios. Sixty-eight participants completed 4 weekly 24-h recalls followed by a blood draw. RBC d¹³C and d¹5N were used to predict sweetener intake, including total sugars, added sugars, and sugar-sweetened beverages. A model including both d¹³C and d¹5N explained more than 3 times as much of the variation in sweetener intake than did a model using only d¹³C. Because carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios are simultaneously determined in a single, high-throughput analysis, this dual isotope marker provides a simple method to improve the validity of stable isotope markers of sweetener intake with no additional cost. We anticipate that this multi-isotope approach will have utility in any population where a stable isotope biomarker is elevated in several food groups and there are appropriate "covariate" isotopes to control for intake of foods not of research interest.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23256142 View in PubMed
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Changing dietary patterns in the Canadian Arctic: frequency of consumption of foods and beverages by inuit in three Nunavut communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104050
Source
Food Nutr Bull. 2014 Jun;35(2):244-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Tony Sheehy
Fariba Kolahdooz
Cindy Roache
Sangita Sharma
Source
Food Nutr Bull. 2014 Jun;35(2):244-52
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Arctic Regions
Beverages
Body mass index
Canada
Cereals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - ethnology - trends
Dietary Fats
Dietary Sucrose
Female
Food Preferences - ethnology
Fruit
Humans
Inuits
Male
Meat
Middle Aged
Nunavut
Questionnaires
Vegetables
Abstract
Inuit in Arctic regions are experiencing a rapid diet and lifestyle transition. There are limited data on food consumption patterns among this unique population, raising concerns about assessing the risk for the development of diet-related chronic diseases.
To assess the current frequency of consumption of foods and beverages among Inuit in Nunavut, Arctic Canada.
A cross-sectional dietary study was conducted among randomly selected Inuit adults from three communities in Nunavut using a validated quantitative food frequency questionnaire. The participants were 175 women and 36 men with median (IQR) ages of 41.0 (32.5-48.5) and 40.1 (30.0-50.0) years, respectively. The mean and median frequencies of consumption over a 30-day period were computed for 147 individual food items and grouped as foods or beverages.
The 30 most frequently consumed foods were identified. Non-nutrient-dense foods (i.e., high-fat and high-sugar foods) were the most frequently consumed food group (median intake, 3.4 times/day), followed by grains (2.0 times/day) and traditional meats (1.7 times/day). The frequency of consumption of fruits (0.7 times/day) and vegetables (0.4 times/day) was low. The median values for the three most frequently consumed food items were sugar or honey (once/day), butter (0.71 times/day), and Coffee-mate (0.71 times/day). Apart from water, coffee, and tea, the most frequently consumed beverages were sweetened juices (0.71 times/day) and regular pop (soft drinks) (0.36 times/day). This study showed that non-nutrient-dense foods are consumed most frequently in these Inuit communities.
The results have implications for dietary quality and provide useful information on current dietary practices to guide nutritional intervention programs.
PubMed ID
25076772 View in PubMed
Less detail

Characteristic of actual food at elderly and senile aged population of Yakutia

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270953
Source
Wiad Lek. 2015;68(4):508-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
V. Neustroeva
E. Kylbanova
G. Simonova
O. Tatarinova
L. Scherbakova
Source
Wiad Lek. 2015;68(4):508-11
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Diet - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Eating - ethnology
Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Population Groups - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Russia - ethnology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
To conduct estimation of actual food among in digenous and arrived population of Yakutia of elderly and senile ages.
In the work results of epidemiological research with analysis of actual food of the population of Yakutia at the age of 60 years and over are presented. On the basis of a list of candidates with use of random selection a representative sample of men and women of Yakutsk at the age of 60 years and more has been generated. In total 775 foreheads were surveyed, the middle age has made 75.7 ± 9.4 years. For the analysis of actual food 575 people (244 men and 331 women) have been included. Among the surveyed there were 244 respondents of the in digenous population (the Yakuts) and 331 arrived respondents (the Russians, the Ukrainians, the Byelorussians, the Poles, the Germans, the Jews). The estimation of actual food is conducted by means of a frequency questionnaire.
High content of general fat, sated fat acids, polyunsaturated fat acids and refined sugar due to low consumption of general carbohydrates is revealed. At the analysis of food package of the indigenous population in comparison with the newly arrived some distinctions in consumption of following products are revealed: fresh, tinned and frozen vegetables, potatoes, eggs, horsemeat, venison, koumiss, fresh fruit and berries, oil and fats, bean, juice and drinks, sugar, chocolate and confectionery products.
daily food intake of the indigenous population of elderly and senile ages is notable for lower daily caloric content, greater general fat, SFA, less consumption of refined sugar on the background of significantly lower content of general carbohydrates, starch and food proteins. In diets at theYakuts there is considerably lower consumption of fresh and tinned vegetables, potatoes, eggs, fresh fruit and berries, bean, nuts, sugar, chocolate and confectionery products and higher consumption of meat products (horsemeat, venison), oil and fats.
PubMed ID
26887122 View in PubMed
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