Skip header and navigation

Refine By

8 records – page 1 of 1.

Regional food culture and development.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164404
Source
Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2007;16 Suppl 1:2-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Mark L Wahlqvist
Meei-Shyuan Lee
Author Affiliation
Asia Pacific Health and Nutrition Centre, Monash Asia Institute, 8th Floor Menzies Buliding, Monash University, Wellington Road, Clayton, Melbourne, Victoria 3800, Australia. mark.wahlqvist@adm.monash.edu.au
Source
Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2007;16 Suppl 1:2-7
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agriculture
Commerce
Diet - economics - ethnology - standards
Food Habits - ethnology
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Nutritive Value
Abstract
Food culture is most influenced by the locality of its origin, which will have been one of food acquisition and processing by various means. It is generally agreed, and is the basis of much United Nations, especially Food and Agriculture Organisation strategic development policy, that successful agriculture, horticulture and aquaculture along with fishing, underpin economically viable and healthy communities with their various food cultures. We also know that this must be in tandem with maternal literacy and operational health care systems. These elements are best represented on a regional basis. There is a growing consumer interest in knowing where one's food comes from as a measure of "food integrity". However, food production alone can be a precarious business and relate to a lesser or greater extent to local food culture and to trade, which may be complementary or at-odds with each other. Likewise, the local food culture may have its strengths and weaknesses as far as its ability to meet nutritional and health needs is concerned. Local food production may be restricted because of geographical or socio-economic conditions which preclude food diversity, although this may be compensated for by trade. Where food adequacy and diversity is compromised, and soils poor, various macronutrient, micronutrient (from animals and plants) and phytonutrient (nutritionally-advantageous food component from plants) deficiencies may be in evidence. These food system problems may be intertwined with food culture--for example, "rice-based and water-soluble vitamin poor"; "few animal-derived foods like meat, fish, eggs and milk with associated low calcium, vitamin D, Vitamin B12 and long chain n-3 fatty acid intakes"; "low fruit and vegetable intake with limited carotenoids and other phytonutrients". Geo-satellite surveillance and mapping as identifying such "hot spots": for regional food problems, as well as hot spots where most of the world's biodiversity is found (1.4 % of land on earth). On the other hand, regional food culture can confer considerable advantage for health and economic development, but does not necessarily do so. The challenge is to respect and retain traditional food knowledge and sustainable food systems, with good governance for food security. There has been a recent awakening of interest and concern about the lack of documentation of traditional and indigenous food cultures which are important not only for their own sake, but for the legacy of food knowledge which they can confer on future generations, provided they are not lost. Hence, the value of a special focus on African food cultures (www.healthyeatingclub.org/Africa), including Rift and Nile Valleys and North West African foods, which are the cradles of human food systems and habits. This is the case too with indigenous foods and food cultures (whether hunter-gatherer or subsistence agriculture); with relatively long-living food cultures in North East Asia, with food cultural distinction and fusion (FHILL and SENECA studies) and with migratory Food Habits. By and large, there is a remarkable resilience and ingenuity of people and their food systems, but monoculture and lack of diversity encourage food system failure.
PubMed ID
17392068 View in PubMed
Less detail

A participatory food costing model in Nova Scotia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118355
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2012;73(4):181-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Patricia Williams
Michelle Amero
Barbara Anderson
Doris Gillis
Rebecca Green-LaPierre
Christine Johnson
Debra Reimer
Author Affiliation
Department of Applied Human Nutrition, Mount Saint Vincent University, Halifax, NS.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2012;73(4):181-8
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Capacity building
Community-Based Participatory Research
Costs and Cost Analysis
Diet - economics - ethnology
Food Supply - economics
Humans
Models, Economic
Nova Scotia
Nutrition Policy
Abstract
In recognition of the growing challenge that food insecurity has on population health, a multisectoral partnership in Nova Scotia has been working since 2001 to address province-wide accessibility to a nutritious diet. The participatory food costing (PFC) model has been at the forefront of provincial and national efforts to address food insecurity; a local foods component was incorporated in 2004. This model has engaged community partners, including those affected by food insecurity, in all stages of the research, thereby building capacity at multiple levels to influence policy change and food systems redesign. By putting principles of participatory action research into practice, dietitians have contributed their technical, research, and facilitation expertise to support capacity building among the partners. The PFC model has provided people experiencing food insecurity with a mechanism for sharing their voices. By valuing different ways of knowing, the model has facilitated much-needed dialogue on the broad and interrelated determinants of food security and mobilized knowledge that reflects these perspectives. The development of the model is described, as are lessons learned from a decade of highly productive research and knowledge mobilization that have increased stakeholders' understanding of and involvement in addressing the many facets of food security in Nova Scotia.
PubMed ID
23217445 View in PubMed
Less detail

Traditional and market food access in Arctic Canada is affected by economic factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79628
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Sep;65(4):331-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
  1 document  
Author
Lambden Jill
Receveur Olivier
Marshall Joan
Kuhnlein Harriet V
Author Affiliation
Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment (CINE), McGill University, Montreal, Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Sep;65(4):331-40
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
358177
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Arctic Regions
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Culture
Diet - economics - ethnology
Female
Food Supply - economics
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Middle Aged
Nutritional Requirements
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to evaluate the access that Indigenous women have to traditional and market foods in 44 communities across Arctic Canada. STUDY DESIGN: This secondary data analysis used a cross-sectional survey of 1771 Yukon First Nations, Dene/Métis and Inuit women stratified by age. METHODS: Socio-cultural questionnaires were used to investigate food access and chi-square testing was used to ascertain the distribution of subject responses by age and region. RESULTS: There was considerable regional variation in the ability to afford adequate food, with between 40% and 70% saying they could afford enough food. Similarly, regional variation was reflected in the percentage of the population who could afford, or had access to, hunting or fishing equipment. Up to 50% of the responses indicated inadequate access to fishing and hunting equipment, and up to 46% of participants said they could not afford to go hunting or fishing. CONCLUSIONS: Affordability of market food and accessibility to hunting and fishing in Arctic Canada were major barriers to Indigenous women's food security.
PubMed ID
17131971 View in PubMed
Documents

f7b267306c8901d32a53280049bb1775244d.pdf

Read PDF Online Download PDF
Less detail

Determinants of meal satisfaction in a workplace environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287710
Source
Appetite. 2016 Oct 01;105:195-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-01-2016
Author
Pernille Haugaard
Catalin M Stancu
Per B Brockhoff
Inga Thorsdottir
Liisa Lähteenmäki
Source
Appetite. 2016 Oct 01;105:195-203
Date
Oct-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Agriculture - manpower
Consumer Behavior
Denmark
Energy Intake - ethnology
Female
Food Quality
Food Services
Healthy Diet - economics - ethnology - psychology
Humans
Lunch - ethnology - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Mindfulness
Models, Psychological
Patient Compliance - ethnology - psychology
Satiety Response
Stress, Psychological - ethnology - prevention & control - psychology
Technology Transfer
Workplace - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Workplace lunches are recurrent meal occasions that can contribute to the general well-being of employees. The objective of our research was to study which factors influence consumers' satisfaction with these meals by exploring the relative role of food-related, personal, situational factors. Using a longitudinal approach, we monitored a total of 71 participants compiled and experienced 519 meals from their workplace canteen buffet during a three-month period; in addition the composed lunches were photographed. Before and after the lunch choice period respondents filled in a questionnaire on several meal-related variables. A mixed modelling approach was used to analyse the data. Meal satisfaction was directly associated with a positive ambience and a positive evaluation of both the quality of the food eaten and the buffet assortment, whereas the meal's energy content did not contribute to meal satisfaction. Additionally, meal satisfaction was associated with a more positive mood, lower hunger level as well as feeling less busy and stressed after lunch. The buffet assortment, a more positive mood before lunch and mindful eating contributed to the perceived food quality, but not associated with the hunger level before lunch. Time available, mindful eating and eating with close colleagues were positively associated with perceived ambience. The results indicate that consumers' satisfaction with workplace meals can be increased by putting emphasis on the quality of food served, but equally important is the ambience in the lunch situation. Most of the ambience factors were related to available time and mental resources of the participants and the possibility to share the meal with close colleagues. These are factors that can be facilitated by the service provider, but not directly influenced.
PubMed ID
27235825 View in PubMed
Less detail

Attribute importance segmentation of Norwegian seafood consumers: The inclusion of salient packaging attributes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291603
Source
Appetite. 2017 Oct 01; 117:214-223
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Date
Oct-01-2017
Author
Svein Ottar Olsen
Ho Huu Tuu
Klaus G Grunert
Author Affiliation
School of Business and Economics, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway. Electronic address: svein.o.olsen@uit.no.
Source
Appetite. 2017 Oct 01; 117:214-223
Date
Oct-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Keywords
Adult
Cluster analysis
Consumer Behavior - economics
Cookbooks as Topic - economics
Cooking - economics
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Food Packaging - economics
Food Preferences - ethnology
Food Quality
Food, Preserved - adverse effects - economics
Healthy Diet - economics - ethnology - psychology
Humans
Internet
Male
Meals - ethnology
Models, Psychological
Norway
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritive Value
Patient Compliance - ethnology
Seafood - adverse effects - economics
Abstract
The main purpose of this study is to identify consumer segments based on the importance of product attributes when buying seafood for homemade meals on weekdays. There is a particular focus on the relative importance of the packaging attributes of fresh seafood. The results are based on a representative survey of 840 Norwegian consumers between 18 and 80 years of age. This study found that taste, freshness, nutritional value and naturalness are the most important attributes for the home consumption of seafood. Except for the high importance of information about expiration date, most other packaging attributes have only medium importance. Three consumer segments are identified based on the importance of 33 attributes associated with seafood: Perfectionists, Quality Conscious and Careless Consumers. The Quality Conscious consumers feel more self-confident in their evaluation of quality, and are less concerned with packaging, branding, convenience and emotional benefits compared to the Perfectionists. Careless Consumers are important as regular consumers of convenient and pre-packed seafood products and value recipe information on the packaging. The seafood industry may use the results provided in this study to strengthen their positioning of seafood across three different consumer segments.
PubMed ID
28669742 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changing subsistence practices at the Dorset Paleoeskimo site of Phillip's Garden, Newfoundland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187202
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2003;40(1):106-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Lisa M Hodgetts
M A P Renouf
Maribeth S Murray
Darlene McCuaig-Balkwill
Lesley Howse
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2003;40(1):106-20
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anthropology, Cultural - education - history
Arctic regions - ethnology
Climate Change - history
Diet - economics - ethnology - history
Fisheries - history
Food Supply - history
Gardening - education - history
History, 15th Century
History, 16th Century
History, 17th Century
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
History, Ancient
History, Medieval
Humans
Newfoundland and Labrador - ethnology
Plants
Population Groups - education - ethnology - history
Seals, Earless
Abstract
A comparison of identified faunal assemblages from the Dorset site of Phillip's Garden indicates that harp seal hunting was the main focus of activity throughout the site's occupation. Despite the highly specialized nature of site use, it appears that reliance on harp seal decreased over time while fish and birds became increasingly important. These changes may reflect longer seasonal occupations at the site in later centuries, and/or a decrease in the local availability of harp seal. The observed shift coincides with the onset of a local climatic warming trend, which might have affected harp seal movements in the area. Dorset subsistence and settlement patterns in Newfoundland are still poorly understood due to a lack of preserved faunal assemblages in the region. The temporal trend illustrated here indicates that we cannot assume that these patterns were static throughout the Dorset occupation of the island.
PubMed ID
21755642 View in PubMed
Less detail

Exchanging a few commercial, regularly consumed food items with improved fat quality reduces total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol: a double-blind, randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282796
Source
Br J Nutr. 2016 Oct;116(8):1383-1393
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
Stine M Ulven
Lena Leder
Elisabeth Elind
Inger Ottestad
Jacob J Christensen
Vibeke H Telle-Hansen
Anne J Skjetne
Ellen Raael
Navida A Sheikh
Marianne Holck
Kristin Torvik
Amandine Lamglait
Kari Thyholt
Marte G Byfuglien
Linda Granlund
Lene F Andersen
Kirsten B Holven
Source
Br J Nutr. 2016 Oct;116(8):1383-1393
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology - prevention & control
Cholesterol - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Diet, High-Fat - adverse effects - economics - ethnology
Double-Blind Method
Fatty Acids, Omega-6 - administration & dosage - economics - therapeutic use
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Food Quality
Foods, Specialized - economics
Healthy Diet - economics - ethnology
Humans
Hypercholesterolemia - blood - diet therapy - ethnology - physiopathology
Lost to Follow-Up
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Dropouts
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
The healthy Nordic diet has been previously shown to have health beneficial effects among subjects at risk of CVD. However, the extent of food changes needed to achieve these effects is less explored. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of exchanging a few commercially available, regularly consumed key food items (e.g. spread on bread, fat for cooking, cheese, bread and cereals) with improved fat quality on total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and inflammatory markers in a double-blind randomised, controlled trial. In total, 115 moderately hypercholesterolaemic, non-statin-treated adults (25-70 years) were randomly assigned to an experimental diet group (Ex-diet group) or control diet group (C-diet group) for 8 weeks with commercially available food items with different fatty acid composition (replacing SFA with mostly n-6 PUFA). In the Ex-diet group, serum total cholesterol (P
PubMed ID
27737722 View in PubMed
Less detail

8 records – page 1 of 1.