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A 5-year longitudinal study of the relationship between the wish to be thinner, lifestyle behaviours and disturbed eating in 9-20-year old girls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99387
Source
Eur Eat Disord Rev. 2010 May;18(3):207-19
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Josefin Westerberg-Jacobson
Birgitta Edlund
Ata Ghaderi
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Uppsala University, BMC, Husargatan, Uppsala, Sweden. josefin.westerberg-jacobson@pubcare.uu.se
Source
Eur Eat Disord Rev. 2010 May;18(3):207-19
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body Image
Body mass index
Child
Diet, Reducing - psychology
Eating Disorders - prevention & control - psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Life Style
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sedentary lifestyle
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this 5-year longitudinal study of 593 girls (9-20-year-old) was to examine whether the internalization of the thinness ideal in terms of 'a wish to be thinner' might be related to lifestyle factors and longitudinally increase the risk of disturbed eating over time. Results showed that a wish to be thinner was related to lifestyle factors, eating attitudes and body mass index (BMI) longitudinally. Girls who wished to be thinner dieted more often, thought that they would be more popular if they were thinner, skipped meals, were eating breakfast more often alone and had a higher BMI compared to the girls without such a wish. Girls who wished to be thinner were 4 times more likely to develop disturbed eating attitudes over a 5-year period. These findings point to the importance of helping adolescents to establish regular eating habits, to avoid unhealthy dieting practices and to prevent sedentary behaviours that might lead to overweight and or obesity in early childhood.
PubMed ID
20443204 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of self-reported body weight compared to measured body weight. A population survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235826
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1987;15(3):191-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
L. Jalkanen
J. Tuomilehto
A. Tanskanen
P. Puska
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1987;15(3):191-8
Date
1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Awareness
Blood pressure
Body Weight
Diet, Reducing - psychology
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors
Truth Disclosure
Abstract
In 1977, in the evaluation of the prevention programme for cardiovascular diseases, 11,880 persons in Eastern Finland were asked to report their own weight on a questionnaire. Each participant was weighted during the following clinical examination. The data of the self-reported body weight were analysed according to sex, age, measured weight and body-mass index (BMI). The results showed that older people underestimated their weight to a greater extent than did younger people of both sexes. The error between measured and self-reported weight was greater in heavier subjects than in thinner individuals. In both sexes weight estimate error (measured weight minus self-reported weight) correlated more strongly with high BMI than with measured weight. Associations between weight estimate error and other variables were studied using a multiple regression model. Men whose annual family income was low were more likely to underestimate their weight than the men with a high annual income. In general, women reported their weight more correctly than men did. Older women were more likely to report their weight less than younger women, whereas women who visited their doctor frequently or who had higher annual family incomes were more aware of their actual body weight than those who had few doctor's consultations or whose family income was low. In men 5.2% and in women 8.3% of the variation in the weight estimate error was explained by the regression model.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
3616534 View in PubMed
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Adherence of pregnant women to Nordic dietary guidelines in relation to postpartum weight retention: results from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256846
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:75
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Anne von Ruesten
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Margaretha Haugen
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Kirsten Mehlig
Anna Winkvist
Lauren Lissner
Author Affiliation
Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. Anne.Lise.Brantsaeter@fhi.no.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:75
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body Weight
Diet Surveys
Diet, Reducing - psychology
Female
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Nutrition Policy
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Postpartum Period - psychology
Pregnancy
Weight Gain
Young Adult
Abstract
Pregnancy is a major life event for women and often connected with changes in diet and lifestyle and natural gestational weight gain. However, excessive weight gain during pregnancy may lead to postpartum weight retention and add to the burden of increasing obesity prevalence. Therefore, it is of interest to examine whether adherence to nutrient recommendations or food-based guidelines is associated with postpartum weight retention 6 months after birth.
This analysis is based on data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. Diet during the first 4-5 months of pregnancy was assessed by a food-frequency questionnaire and maternal weight before pregnancy as well as in the postpartum period was assessed by questionnaires. Two Healthy Eating Index (HEI) scores were applied to measure compliance with either the official Norwegian food-based guidelines (HEI-NFG) or the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations (HEI-NNR) during pregnancy. The considered outcome, i.e. weight retention 6 months after birth, was modelled in two ways: continuously (in kg) and categorically (risk of substantial postpartum weight retention, i.e. =?5% gain to pre-pregnancy weight). Associations between the HEI-NFG and HEI-NNR score with postpartum weight retention on the continuous scale were estimated by linear regression models. Relationships of both HEI scores with the categorical outcome variable were evaluated using logistic regression.
In the continuous model without adjustment for gestational weight gain (GWG), the HEI-NFG score but not the HEI-NNR score was inversely related to postpartum weight retention. However, after additional adjustment for GWG as potential intermediate the HEI-NFG score was marginally inversely and the HEI-NNR score was inversely associated with postpartum weight retention. In the categorical model, both HEI scores were inversely related with risk of substantial postpartum weight retention, independent of adjustment for GWG.
Higher adherence to either the official Norwegian food guidelines or possibly also to Nordic Nutrition Recommendations during pregnancy appears to be associated with lower postpartum weight retention.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24456804 View in PubMed
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Adipose tissue morphology predicts improved insulin sensitivity following moderate or pronounced weight loss.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272781
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2015 Jun;39(6):893-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
D. Eriksson-Hogling
D P Andersson
J. Bäckdahl
J. Hoffstedt
S. Rössner
A. Thorell
E. Arner
P. Arner
M. Rydén
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2015 Jun;39(6):893-8
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipocytes - metabolism - pathology
Adipose Tissue, White - metabolism - pathology
Adult
Bariatric Surgery
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Body mass index
Cell Enlargement
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - etiology - metabolism - prevention & control
Diet, Reducing
Female
Humans
Inflammation - etiology - metabolism
Male
Obesity - complications - metabolism - pathology - surgery
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Sweden
Weight Loss
Abstract
Cross-sectional studies show that white adipose tissue hypertrophy (few, large adipocytes), in contrast to hyperplasia (many, small adipocytes), associates with insulin resistance and increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. We investigated if baseline adipose cellularity could predict improvements in insulin sensitivity following weight loss.
Plasma samples and subcutaneous abdominal adipose biopsies were examined in 100 overweight or obese individuals before and 10 weeks after a hypocaloric diet (7±3% weight loss) and in 61 obese subjects before and 2 years after gastric by-pass surgery (33±9% weight loss). The degree of adipose tissue hypertrophy or hyperplasia (termed the morphology value) in each individual was calculated on the basis of the relationship between fat cell volume and total fat mass. Insulin sensitivity was determined by homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMAIR).
In both cohorts at baseline, subjects with hypertrophy displayed significantly higher fasting plasma insulin and HOMAIR values than subjects with hyperplasia (P
PubMed ID
25666530 View in PubMed
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Age-related telomere shortening occurs in lens epithelium from old rats and is slowed by caloric restriction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50817
Source
Exp Eye Res. 2001 Aug;73(2):221-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2001
Author
W R Pendergrass
P E Penn
J. Li
N S Wolf
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA.
Source
Exp Eye Res. 2001 Aug;73(2):221-8
Date
Aug-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - physiology
Animals
Cataract - etiology
Cells, Cultured
Diet, Reducing
Epithelial Cells - cytology
Fibroblasts - ultrastructure
Humans
In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence
Interphase - physiology
Lens, Crystalline - cytology
Metaphase - physiology
Nucleic Acid Probes
Rats
Reference Values
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sensitivity and specificity
Statistics, nonparametric
Telomere - ultrastructure
Abstract
We have investigated whether the average relative telomere length of lens epithelial cells (LECs) from brown Norway rats decreases with the age of the donor animal, and whether chronic caloric restriction (CR) of the rats delays the telomere shortening. Our previous studies have demonstrated that clonal proliferative potential of rodent LECs as well as the in vivo rate of DNA synthesis decreases with age and that this decrease is slowed by chronic lifelong caloric restriction (CR). In order to determine if telomeric shortening might be involved in this loss of proliferative potential, we examined relative telomeric lengths in young, old ad lib fed (AL), and old calorically restricted (CR) brown Norway rats. We used fluorescence in situ hybridization with a peptide nucleic acid probe (PNA) complementary to the telomeric repeat sequence to quantitate relative telomere lengths in LECs in lens sections (TELO-FISH). Control experiments demonstrated that the PNA probe binding was restricted almost entirely to the terminal portions of the rat chromosomes with less than 5% bound at interstitial sites in typical metaphase spreads. The relative telomere lengths of interphase human fibroblast standards, as determined by TELO-FISH, were in good agreement with terminal restriction fragment analyses of the same standards and with literature values for rat cells. The average telomere lengths of interphase nuclei in the old AL rat LECs were found to be 21% shorter than paired young AL controls (P
PubMed ID
11446772 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 May 8;93(19):1819
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-8-1996
Author
S. Rössner
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 May 8;93(19):1819
Date
May-8-1996
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Diet, Reducing
Humans
PubMed ID
8667809 View in PubMed
Less detail

An observational study of slimming behavior in Denmark in 1992 and 1998.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49794
Source
Obes Res. 2002 Sep;10(9):911-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Hanne Bendixen
Jesper Madsen
Dorthe Bay-Hansen
Ulrik Boesen
Lars F Ovesen
Else Marie Bartels
Arne Astrup
Author Affiliation
Research Department of Human Nutrition, the Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Rolighedsvej 30, DK-1958 Frederiksberg C, Denmark. hb@kvl.dk
Source
Obes Res. 2002 Sep;10(9):911-22
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Obesity Agents - therapeutic use
Body mass index
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet, Reducing
Exercise
Female
Food, Formulated
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology - therapy
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Sex Characteristics
Weight Loss
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To elucidate how frequent weight-loss attempts are made, the methods used to achieve weight loss, and the extent to which the outcome is positive. RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES: Two independent interviews were conducted in 1992 and in 1998, each with 1200 randomly selected adult subjects. Each survey was designed to ensure an equal distribution of age, gender, and geographical regions in Denmark. RESULTS: The proportion of subjects having attempted weight loss did not change from 1992 to 1998, although the prevalence of overweight and obesity increased from 1992 (overweight, 30%; obesity, 6%) to 1998 (overweight, 35%; obesity, 8%). Almost twice as many women (61%) than men (32%) had attempted weight loss (p 50 years (39%) (p 50 years. Changes in habitual diet and increased physical activity are the most prevalent modes of slimming, whereas the use of over-the-counter diet pills or meal replacements has decreased from 1992 to 1998. This development may have a positive impact on future body- weight-management strategies.
PubMed ID
12226140 View in PubMed
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Anthropometric and metabolic improvements in human type 2 diabetes after introduction of an Okinawan-based Nordic diet are not associated with changes in microbial diversity or SCFA concentrations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295898
Source
Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2018 Sep; 69(6):729-740
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2018
Author
Fang Huang
Clara Nilholm
Bodil Roth
Caroline Linninge
Peter Höglund
Margareta Nyman
Bodil Ohlsson
Author Affiliation
a Food for Health Science Centre , Lund University , Lund , Sweden.
Source
Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2018 Sep; 69(6):729-740
Date
Sep-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diet therapy - microbiology
Diet - classification
Diet, Reducing
Dietary Fiber
Fatty Acids, Volatile - blood
Feces - microbiology
Female
Gastrointestinal Microbiome
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The Okinawan-based Nordic (O-BN) diet improves anthropometry and metabolism in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. The aim of this study was to study mechanisms behind improvements by examining Enterobacteriaceae abundance, microbial diversity, and concentrations of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). A secondary aim was exploring if metformin treatment affects microbiota or SCFAs. Thirty T2DM patients received the O-BN diet for 12 weeks. Faecal and blood samples were collected at baseline, 12 and 28 weeks. Although patients experienced weight loss and improved metabolic parameters, there were no significant changes in Enterobacteriaceae abundance or microbial diversity. Patients on metformin displayed higher Enterobacteriaceae abundance throughout the study (p?=?.008, p?=?.038, and p?=?.001, respectively). Isovaleric acid was decreased after 12 weeks (p?=?.018). Butyric acid was decreased at follow-up (p?=?.007). Improved anthropometry and metabolism in T2DM after introduction of the O-BN diet is not associated with changes in Enterobacteriaceae abundance, microbial diversity or SCFA concentrations.
PubMed ID
29199483 View in PubMed
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Anthropometric, metabolic, psychosocial and dietary factors associated with dropout in overweight and obese postmenopausal women engaged in a 6-month weight loss programme: a MONET study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147225
Source
Br J Nutr. 2010 Apr;103(8):1230-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Virginie Messier
Jessy Hayek
Antony D Karelis
Lyne Messier
Eric Doucet
Denis Prud'homme
Rémi Rabasa-Lhoret
Irene Strychar
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada. virginie.messier@ircm.qc.ca
Source
Br J Nutr. 2010 Apr;103(8):1230-5
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diet, Reducing
Female
Ghrelin - blood
Humans
Insulin - blood
Leptin - blood
Life Style
Middle Aged
Obesity - rehabilitation
Ontario
Overweight - psychology - rehabilitation
Postmenopause
Resistance Training - methods
Sedentary lifestyle
Self Concept
Abstract
The objective of the present study was to examine anthropometric, metabolic, psychosocial and dietary factors associated with dropout in a 6-month weight loss intervention aimed at reducing body weight by 10 %. The study sample included 137 sedentary, overweight and obese postmenopausal women, participating in a weight loss intervention that consisted of either energy restriction (ER) or ER with resistance training (ER+RT). Anthropometric (BMI, percent lean body mass, percent fat mass, visceral adipose tissue and waist circumference), metabolic (total energy expenditure, RMR, insulin sensitivity and fasting plasma levels of leptin and ghrelin), psychosocial (body esteem, self-esteem, stress, dietary restraint, disinhibition, hunger, quality of life, self-efficacy, perceived benefits for controlling weight and perceived risk) and dietary (3-d food record) variables were measured. Thirty subjects out of 137 dropped out of the weight loss programme (22 %), with no significant differences in dropout rates between those in the ER and the ER+RT groups. Overall, amount of weight loss was significantly lower in dropouts than in completers ( - 1.7 (sd 3.5) v. - 5.6 (sd 4.3) kg, P
PubMed ID
19930768 View in PubMed
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168 records – page 1 of 17.