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Effect of Mediterranean diet with and without weight loss on apolipoprotein B100 metabolism in men with metabolic syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106012
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2014 Feb;34(2):433-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Caroline Richard
Patrick Couture
Esther M M Ooi
André J Tremblay
Sophie Desroches
Amélie Charest
Alice H Lichtenstein
Benoît Lamarche
Author Affiliation
From the Institute of Nutrition and Functional Foods, Laval University, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada (C.R., P.C., A.J.T., S.D., A.C., B.L.); Metabolic Research Centre, School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia (E.M.M.O.); and Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory, Tufts University, Boston, MA (A.H.L.).
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2014 Feb;34(2):433-8
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Apolipoprotein B-100 - blood
Biological Markers - blood
Diet, Mediterranean
Energy intake
Humans
Kinetics
Lipoproteins, HDL - blood
Lipoproteins, LDL - blood
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood - diagnosis - diet therapy
Middle Aged
Models, Biological
Particle Size
Quebec
Treatment Outcome
Weight Loss
Young Adult
Abstract
To assess the effect of a Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) with and without weight loss (WL) on apolipoprotein B100 (apoB100) metabolism in men with metabolic syndrome.
The diet of 19 men with metabolic syndrome (age, 24-62 years) was first standardized to a North American isoenergetic control diet for 5 weeks, followed by an isoenergetic MedDiet for an additional 5 weeks under full-feeding conditions (MedDiet-WL). Participants next underwent a 20-week supervised WL program under free-living conditions (-10.2 ± 2.9% body weight; P
PubMed ID
24265415 View in PubMed
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Effect of the Mediterranean diet with and without weight loss on surrogate markers of cholesterol homeostasis in men with the metabolic syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132707
Source
Br J Nutr. 2012 Mar;107(5):705-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Caroline Richard
Patrick Couture
Sophie Desroches
Suzanne Benjannet
Nabil G Seidah
Alice H Lichtenstein
Benoît Lamarche
Author Affiliation
Institute of Nutraceuticals and Functional Foods, Laval University, 2440, Boulevard Hochelaga, Quebec, QC, Canada G1V 0A6.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2012 Mar;107(5):705-11
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
Body mass index
Cholesterol - blood - metabolism
Cholesterol, LDL - blood - metabolism
Diet, Mediterranean
Diet, Reducing
Humans
Hypercholesterolemia - etiology - prevention & control
Isomerism
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood - diet therapy - metabolism - physiopathology
Middle Aged
Overweight - physiopathology
Phytosterols - blood
Proprotein Convertases - blood
Quebec
Serine Endopeptidases - blood
Weight Loss
Young Adult
Abstract
The mechanisms implicated in the LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C)-lowering effects of the Mediterranean-type diet (MedDiet) are unknown. The present study assessed the impact of the MedDiet consumed under controlled feeding conditions, with and without weight loss, on surrogate markers of cholesterol absorption, synthesis and clearance using plasma phytosterols, lathosterol and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin-9 (PCSK9) concentrations, respectively, in men with the metabolic syndrome. The subjects' diet (n 19, 24-62 years) was first standardised to a baseline North American control diet (5 weeks) followed by a MedDiet (5 weeks), both under weight-maintaining isoenergetic feeding conditions. The participants then underwent a 20-week free-living energy restriction period (10 (sd 3) % reduction in body weight, P 
PubMed ID
21787450 View in PubMed
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