Skip header and navigation

2 records – page 1 of 1.

Association between a Mediterranean-type diet and risk of preterm birth among Danish women: a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87329
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2008;87(3):325-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Mikkelsen Tina B
Osterdal Marie Louise
Knudsen Vibeke K
Haugen Margaretha
Meltzer Helle M
Bakketeig Leiv
Olsen Sjurdur F
Author Affiliation
Maternal Nutrition Group, Danish Epidemiology Science Centre, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen S, Denmark. tbm@forskningskonsulent.dk
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2008;87(3):325-30
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet, Mediterranean
Female
Humans
Maternal Nutrition Physiology
Pregnancy
Premature Birth - epidemiology - prevention & control
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Thus far, few factors with a causal relation to preterm birth have been identified. Many studies have focused on the woman's diet, but most have been discouraging. The aim of the present study was to examine if maternal intake of a Mediterranean-type diet (MD) is associated with reduced risk of preterm birth. METHODS: The Danish National Birth Cohort assessed diet in mid-pregnancy by food frequency questionnaires (FFQ). Women consuming MD were those who ate fish twice a week or more, used olive or rape seed oil, consumed 5+ fruits and vegetables a day, ate meat (other than poultry and fish) at most twice a week, and drank at most 2 cups of coffee a day. RESULTS: Of 35,530 non-smoking women, 1,137 (3.2%) fulfilled all MD criteria, and 540 (1.5%) none. Odds ratios for preterm birth and early preterm birth were 0.61 (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.35-1.05) and 0.28 (0.11-0.76), respectively, in MD women compared to women fulfilling none of the MD criteria. CONCLUSION: Shifting towards a MD during pregnancy may reduce the risk of early delivery in Danish women.
PubMed ID
18307073 View in PubMed
Less detail

Mediterranean-type diet and risk of preterm birth among women in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa): a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87330
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2008;87(3):319-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Haugen Margaretha
Meltzer Helle Margrete
Brantsaeter Anne Lise
Mikkelsen Tina
Osterdal Marie Louise
Alexander Jan
Olsen Sjurdur F
Bakketeig Leiv
Author Affiliation
Division of Environmental Medicine, Department of Food Toxicology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Nydalen, Norway. margaretha.haugen@fhi.no
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2008;87(3):319-24
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Diet, Mediterranean
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Nutrition Physiology
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Premature Birth - epidemiology - prevention & control
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Mediterranean diet has been shown to reduce the incidence of preterm birth. We wanted to investigate whether a Mediterranean-type diet (MD) could be associated with a lower risk of preterm birth in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa). METHODS: The data collection was conducted as part of MoBa at the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. In MoBa, women answer a Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) at week 18-22 of pregnancy. The MD criteria were intake of fish > or =2 times a week, fruit and vegetables > or =5 times a day, use of olive/canola oil, red meat intake
PubMed ID
18307072 View in PubMed
Less detail