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Adherence to the healthy Nordic diet is associated with weight change during 7 years of follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303010
Source
Br J Nutr. 2018 07; 120(1):101-110
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-2018
Author
Noora Kanerva
Kennet Harald
Satu Männistö
Niina E Kaartinen
Mirkka Maukonen
Ari Haukkala
Pekka Jousilahti
Author Affiliation
1Department of Public Health Solutions,National Institute for Health and Welfare,PO Box 30,27100 Helsinki,Finland.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2018 07; 120(1):101-110
Date
07-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anthropometry
Body mass index
Body Weight
Diet
Diet, Healthy
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Life Style
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity
Overweight - prevention & control - therapy
Prospective Studies
Surveys and Questionnaires
Urban Population
Waist Circumference
Abstract
Studies indicate that the healthy Nordic diet may improve heart health, but its relation to weight change is less clear. We studied the association between the adherence to the healthy Nordic diet and long-term changes in weight, BMI and waist circumference. Furthermore, the agreement between self-reported and measured body anthropometrics was examined. The population-based DIetary, Lifestyle and Genetic Determinants of Obesity and Metabolic syndrome Study in 2007 included 5024 Finns aged 25-75 years. The follow-up was conducted in 2014 (n 3735). One-third of the participants were invited to a health examination. The rest were sent measuring tape and written instructions along with questionnaires. The Baltic Sea Diet Score (BSDS) was used to measure adherence to the healthy Nordic diet. Association of the baseline BSDS and changes in BSDS during the follow-up with changes in body anthropometrics were examined using linear regression analysis. The agreement between self-reported and nurse-measured anthropometrics was determined with Bland-Altman analysis. Intra-class correlation coefficients between self-reported and nurse-measured anthropometrics exceeded 0·95. The baseline BSDS associated with lower weight (ß=-0·056, P=0·043) and BMI (ß=-0·021, P=0·031) over the follow-up. This association was especially evident among those who had increased their BSDS. In conclusion, both high initial and improved adherence to the healthy Nordic diet may promote long-term weight maintenance. The self-reported/measured anthropometrics were shown to have high agreement with nurse-measured values which adds the credibility of our results.
PubMed ID
29936927 View in PubMed
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Effects of 1 y of free school fruit on intake of fruits, vegetables, and unhealthy snacks: 14 y later.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302987
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2018 12 01; 108(6):1309-1315
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-01-2018
Author
Tonje Holte Stea
Ingrid Marie Hovdenak
Jannike Rønnestad
Kjersti Rennestraum
Frøydis Nordgård Vik
Knut-Inge Klepp
Elling Bere
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Sport, and Nutrition, University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway.
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2018 12 01; 108(6):1309-1315
Date
12-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Child
Cohort Studies
Diet
Diet Records
Diet, Healthy
Educational Status
Feeding Behavior
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Food Services
Fruit
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Male
Norway
School Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Snacks
Vegetables
Abstract
There are not many studies evaluating the long-term effects of fruit and vegetable interventions.
We examined the effects of 1 y of free fruit in elementary school on long-term consumption of fruit, vegetables, and unhealthy snacks, according to sex and educational attainment, 14 y after the intervention period.
In 2001, the baseline survey of the longitudinal cohort, Fruits and Vegetables Make the Marks (FVMM), included 1950 children (mean age: 11.8 y) attending 38 randomly drawn elementary schools from 2 counties in Norway. In the following 10 mo, 9 schools served as intervention schools by participating in the Norwegian School Fruit Program for free, whereas 29 schools served as control schools. A follow-up survey conducted in 2016 included 982 participants (50%) from the original study sample (mean age: 26.5 y). The consumption of fruit and vegetables was measured by a 24-h recall (portions per day), and the consumption of unhealthy snacks was measured by food-frequency questions (portions per week). Linear mixed models were performed to test possible intervention effects on the consumption of fruit, vegetables, and unhealthy snacks 14 y after the intervention period.
No overall intervention effects after 14 y due to the free-fruit scheme on the consumption of fruit, vegetables, and unhealthy snacks were observed, but significant interactions showed a sustained higher frequency of fruit consumption among females in the intervention group compared with the control group [mean difference (MD): 0.38 portions/d; P = 0.023] and that this effect was only significant among less-educated females (MD: 0.73 portions/d; P = 0.043). No significant long-term intervention effects were observed in the consumption of fruit among highly educated females and males nor in the consumption of vegetables or unhealthy snacks.
Results from the present study indicate that receiving free fruit at school for 1 y may have positive long-term effects for females without higher education.
Notes
CommentIn: Am J Clin Nutr. 2019 Jan 1;109(1):5-6 PMID 30624574
PubMed ID
30339182 View in PubMed
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Periodontal condition in relation to the adherence to nutrient recommendations in daily smokers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303042
Source
J Clin Periodontol. 2018 06; 45(6):636-649
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-2018
Author
Leena M Jauhiainen
Anna L Suominen
Satu Männistö
Matti Knuuttila
Pekka V Ylöstalo
Author Affiliation
Institute of Dentistry, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
J Clin Periodontol. 2018 06; 45(6):636-649
Date
06-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet, Healthy
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oral Hygiene
Periodontal Diseases - diet therapy
Smokers
Surveys and Questionnaires
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To examine whether a healthy diet based on nutrient recommendations is associated with periodontal condition in smokers.
Daily smokers from the cross-sectional Health 2000 Survey (BRIF 8901) in Finland were analysed in two age groups (30-49 and 50-79 years, n = 704 and 267) and according to the level of oral hygiene. Periodontal condition was measured as the number of sextants with gingival bleeding and teeth with =4 mm deepened periodontal pockets. Information on nutrition was collected by a validated food frequency questionnaire and measured using the Baltic Sea Diet Score (BSDS) and the Recommended Finnish Diet Score (RFDS).
In the total study population, no association between the scores and periodontal condition was observed. Among 30- to 49-year-old participants with good oral hygiene, diet scores associated inversely with the number of teeth with deepened periodontal pockets (p = .078 (BSDS) and p = .027 (RFDS)).
In a representative sample of Finnish adults who smoke, a healthy diet was not associated with periodontal condition. Among a younger age group with good oral hygiene, a healthy diet associated with better periodontal condition. Age and oral hygiene appeared to modify the association between diet and periodontal condition.
PubMed ID
29418017 View in PubMed
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Plasma metabolites associated with healthy Nordic dietary indexes and risk of type 2 diabetes-a nested case-control study in a Swedish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302632
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2018 09 01; 108(3):564-575
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-01-2018
Author
Lin Shi
Carl Brunius
Ingegerd Johansson
Ingvar A Bergdahl
Bernt Lindahl
Kati Hanhineva
Rikard Landberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2018 09 01; 108(3):564-575
Date
09-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Biomarkers - blood
Case-Control Studies
Chromatography, Liquid - methods
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood
Diet
Diet, Healthy
Fast Foods - adverse effects
Female
Fruit
Humans
Male
Mass Spectrometry - methods
Metabolomics - methods
Middle Aged
Nutrition Policy
Prospective Studies
Reproducibility of Results
Risk factors
Sweden
Vegetables
Whole Grains
Abstract
Epidemiologic evidence on the association of a healthy Nordic diet and future type 2 diabetes (T2D) is limited. Exploring metabolites as biomarkers of healthy Nordic dietary patterns may facilitate investigation of associations between such patterns and T2D.
We aimed to identify metabolites related to a priori-defined healthy Nordic dietary indexes, the Baltic Sea Diet Score (BSDS) and Healthy Nordic Food Index (HNFI), and evaluate associations with the T2D risk in a case-control study nested in a Swedish population-based prospective cohort.
Plasma samples from 421 case-control pairs at baseline and samples from a subset of 151 healthy controls at a 10-y follow-up were analyzed with the use of untargeted liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry metabolomics. Index-related metabolites were identified through the use of random forest modelling followed by partial correlation analysis adjustment for lifestyle confounders. Metabolite patterns were derived via principal component analysis (PCA). ORs of T2D were estimated via conditional logistic regression. Reproducibility of metabolites was assessed by intraclass correlation (ICC) in healthy controls. Associations were also assessed for 10 metabolites previously identified as linking a healthy Nordic diet with T2D.
In total, 31 metabolites were associated with BSDS and/or HNFI (-0.19 = r = 0.21, 0.10 = ICC = 0.59). Two PCs were determined from index-related metabolites: PC1 strongly correlated to the indexes (r = 0.27 for BSDS, r = 0.25 for HNFI, ICC = 0.45) but showed no association with T2D risk. PC2 was weakly associated with the indexes, but more strongly with foods not part of the indexes, e.g., pizza, sausages, and hamburgers. PC2 was also significantly associated with T2D risk. Predefined metabolites were confirmed to be reflective of consumption of whole grains, fish, or vegetables, but not related to T2D risk.
Our study did not support an association between healthy Nordic dietary indexes and T2D. However, foods such as hamburger, sausage, and pizza not covered by the indexes appeared to be more important for T2D risk in the current population.
PubMed ID
30060042 View in PubMed
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