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Analysis of caries-related factors in infants and toddlers living in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34842
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1996 Apr;54(2):131-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1996
Author
L K Wendt
A L Hallonsten
G. Koch
D. Birkhed
Author Affiliation
Department of Preventive Dental Care, County of Jönköping, Norrahammar, Sweden.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1996 Apr;54(2):131-7
Date
Apr-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chi-Square Distribution
Child Behavior
Child, Preschool
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Diet, Cariogenic
Food Habits
Humans
Infant
Logistic Models
Oral Hygiene
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Saliva - microbiology
Streptococcus mutans - isolation & purification
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The aims of this study were 1) to investigate whether oral hygiene and dietary habits established at 1 year of age are maintained at 2 years of age and 2) to analyze caries-related factors with regard to oral health between the age of 1 and 3 years by using the salutogenic theory-that is, focusing on behavioral factors that do not result in impairment of health. Altogether 289 children were examined at 1, 2, and 3 years of age, and their parents were interviewed about the children's oral hygiene and dietary habits at 1 and 2 years of age. The result shows that caries-related habits, such as oral hygiene and dietary habits, established during infancy are maintained throughout early childhood. The principles of the salutogenic theory were found to be applicable when studying caries-related habits and oral health. Thus, if a dietary risk behavior is established at 1 year of age, the chance of remaining caries-free until 3 years of age is highest if good oral hygiene habits, including the use of fluoride toothpaste, are present at 2 years of age. We therefore conclude that comprehensive knowledge of a child's future dental health can be obtained by using chairside information-that is, interview of the parents and clinical examination of the children.
PubMed ID
8739147 View in PubMed
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An inquiry into the effects of health related behaviour on dental health among young Asian children resident in a fluoridated city in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227862
Source
Community Dent Health. 1990 Dec;7(4):413-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1990
Author
S A Williams
J A Hargreaves
Author Affiliation
Department of Child Dental Health, University of Leeds, UK.
Source
Community Dent Health. 1990 Dec;7(4):413-20
Date
Dec-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta - epidemiology
Asia, Southeastern - ethnology
Bottle Feeding
Breast Feeding
Chi-Square Distribution
Child, Preschool
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology
Diet, Cariogenic
Dietary Carbohydrates - adverse effects
England - epidemiology
Ethnic Groups
Female
Fluoridation
Humans
Infant
Interviews as Topic
Male
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
In low-fluoride areas, infant feeding practices have been implicated in the aetiology of extensive caries found in young Asian children. The purpose of this study was to compare the findings in low-fluoride Leeds, UK with fluoridated Edmonton, in Canada. A multilingual interpreter interviewed Asian parents, and their children aged 2 to 5 years were then given a dental examination. From the initial sample contacted by post, a 72 per cent response rate was achieved. Of the 72 parents interviewed, three-quarters reported that the child was initially breast fed, 11 for over 12 months. The majority of children continued bottle feeding beyond 24 months of age, and one-third drank sweetened milk. Two-thirds of the sample were caries free. The continued use of a feeding bottle per se was not associated with caries experience, but caries was more likely to occur if sugar, honey or cereal were added to the drink. A positive association was found between caries experience and sustained breast feeding beyond 12 months of age. Social variables, including father's occupation and mother's ability to speak English were not related to caries experience. The results confirm that, as in the UK, South Asian parents in Canada provide feeding bottles for their children's drinks well beyond infancy. Nevertheless, in a fluoridated city, bottle-feeding practices were not associated with caries experience unless drinks were sweetened. However, prolonged breast feeding was found to be harmful to dental health. The role of fluoride ingestion in relation to these feeding practices is discussed.
PubMed ID
2292072 View in PubMed
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Background factors of enamel focal demineralization in groups of Finnish and Russian children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227278
Source
J Clin Pediatr Dent. 1991;15(3):174-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
V. Nyyssonen
E. Honkala
E V Borovsky
T A Smirnova
Author Affiliation
Department of Community dentistry, University of Kuopio, Finland.
Source
J Clin Pediatr Dent. 1991;15(3):174-8
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carbonated Beverages - adverse effects
Child
Dental Caries - epidemiology - etiology
Diet, Cariogenic
Dietary Carbohydrates - adverse effects
Educational Status
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Questionnaires
Toothbrushing
USSR - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to analyze the occurrence of EFD lesions in relation to some background factors in Finnish and Soviet children. Children aged 7, 9 and 12 years (n = 1187) were examined clinically in Helsinki, Kuopio (Finland), Moscow and Leningrad (USSR). A questionnaire sent to the parents was used to collect data on toothbrushing frequency, use of sweets, cakes, soft drinks, sugar-sweetened tea/coffee and mother's education. In addition to bivariate analysis, log-linear regression models were used for comparing the simultaneous association in two ethnic groups. In general, the Finnish children had more EFD lesions than the Soviet children did. Among the Finns no consistent associations were found between the number of EFD lesions and the use of different sugar products or differences in toothbrushing habits. The number of EFD lesions decreased consistently according to mother's education with the Finnish children, but not with the Soviet children. The final multivariate model for Finnish children included age, toothbrushing frequency, place of residence (Kuopio) and use of soft drinks. The respective model for the Soviet children included age and place of residence (Leningrad). Evidently, the demineralization process or tooth resistance differs in these two ethnic groups.
PubMed ID
1878328 View in PubMed
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Between-meal eating, toothbrushing frequency and dental caries in 4-year-old children in the north of Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35297
Source
Int J Paediatr Dent. 1995 Jun;5(2):67-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1995
Author
C. Stecksen-Blicks
A K Holm
Author Affiliation
Department of Pedodontics, University of Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Int J Paediatr Dent. 1995 Jun;5(2):67-72
Date
Jun-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Beverages
Child, Preschool
DMF Index
Dental Caries - etiology
Diet, Cariogenic
Feeding Behavior
Food
Humans
Ice Cream
Parents
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Sweetening Agents
Toothbrushing - utilization
Abstract
Two hundred and forty-nine 4-year-old children were examined for dental caries, and data were collected on frequency of toothbrushing, use of fluorides, and intake of nine different snack products. Dental caries experience of children who brushed once or twice daily with parental help was significantly lower than that of children who brushed irregularly. The intake of snacks was high. Buns and cakes, ice cream, and sweet beverages were consumed more often than sweets. Children who had high snack intakes and brushed irregularly had significantly higher caries experience than those with low snack intakes and regular toothbrushing. Therefore irregular toothbrushing was shown to potentiate the impact of frequent snacking.
PubMed ID
7547816 View in PubMed
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[Caries in 2-3 year old children in relation to feeding habits and nationality]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36834
Source
Tandlaegernes Tidsskr. 1992 Feb;(2):44-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1992
Author
L A Nielsen
L. Esmark
Author Affiliation
Det Sundhedsvidenskabelige Fakultet, Københavns Universitet.
Source
Tandlaegernes Tidsskr. 1992 Feb;(2):44-9
Date
Feb-1992
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Dental Caries - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology
Diet, Cariogenic
Feeding Behavior
Humans
Infant
Morocco - ethnology
Pakistan - ethnology
Turkey - ethnology
Yugoslavia - ethnology
PubMed ID
1449738 View in PubMed
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Caries in adolescence - influence from early childhood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130230
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2012 Apr;40(2):125-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
A. Alm
L K Wendt
G. Koch
D. Birkhed
M. Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatric Dentistry, Kärnsjukhuset, Skövde, Sweden. anita.alm@vgregion.se
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2012 Apr;40(2):125-33
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Child
Child, Preschool
Dental Caries - epidemiology - etiology
Diet, Cariogenic - statistics & numerical data
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Infant
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Odds Ratio
Oral Health - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To analyse the relationship between caries determinants in early childhood and caries prevalence in proximal surfaces in adolescents at the age of 15 years.
The present longitudinal study is part of a series of surveys of oral health in 671 children followed from 1 to 15 years of age. Data were selected from examinations, interviews and questionnaires at 1, 3 and 6 years and bitewing radiographs at 15 years of age. Uni- and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to identify caries-related determinants. The outcome variable was carious lesions and fillings (DFa) in approximal tooth surfaces at 15 years of age. Statistical comparisons were made between caries-free teenagers, DFa = 0 and teenagers with DFa > 0, DFa = 4 and DFa = 8, respectively.
In the final logistic regression analyses, caries experience at 6 years and mother's self-estimation of her oral health care as being less good to poor remained statistically significant and were related to caries in all three caries groups (i.e. DF > 0, =4 and =8) at 15 years of age. The consumption of sweets at 1 year remained statistically significant, with a caries experience of DF = 4 and = 8. The variables 'parents born abroad' and female gender were statistically significantly associated with DFa = 4 and DFa = 8, respectively. Furthermore, infrequent toothbrushing habits at 3 years of age and failure to attend the examination at 1 year were statistically significantly associated with caries at 15 years in the univariable analyses.
Early caries experience, consumption of sweets at an early age and mother's self-estimation of her oral health care as being less good to poor are associated with approximal caries in adolescents. The study indicates that caries determinants identified during early childhood have a strong impact on approximal caries in adolescence.
PubMed ID
22022978 View in PubMed
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Caries in five-year-old children and associations with family-related factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198876
Source
J Dent Res. 2000 Mar;79(3):875-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
M L Mattila
P. Rautava
M. Sillanpää
P. Paunio
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Child Neurology, University of Turku, Public Health Center, Finland.
Source
J Dent Res. 2000 Mar;79(3):875-81
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chi-Square Distribution
Child, Preschool
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Diet, Cariogenic
Educational Status
Family Health
Fathers
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Marital status
Maternal Health Services - utilization
Mothers
Oral Hygiene - utilization
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Sampling Studies
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
It is generally understood that the teeth of pre-school-aged children are healthy, but the improvement in the dmft index has halted in the industrialized countries. Those few children who have caries have more of it than before. Little is known of the family-related factors which are associated with this polarization of caries. A representative population-based sample consisted of 1443 mothers expecting their first child. The children were followed at well-baby clinics and public dental health clinics for over five years. The objective was to study the prevalence of dental caries and its predictors in five-year-old children and to assess children's own dental health habits and the meaning of family-related factors in dental health. The findings were based on questionnaire data from parents and on clinical dental examinations of the five-year-old children as completed by 101 public health dentists. In firstborn five-year-old children, dental health was found to be good in 72%, fair in 20%, and poor in 8% of the cases. The final multivariate analysis illustrated that the dmft index > 0 was independently associated with the mother's irregular toothbrushing (OR 2.2; 95% CI 1.4-3.5), annual occurrence of several carious teeth in the father (OR 2.6; 95% CI 1.9-3.6), daily sugar consumption at the age of 18 months (OR 2.4; 95% CI 1.4-4.1), occurrence of child's headaches (OR 3.7; 95% CI 1.5-8.8), parents' cohabitation (OR 3.3; 95% CI 1.5-7.6), rural domicile (OR 2.4; 95% CI 1.2-4.5), and mother's young age (OR 5.0; 95% CI 1.3-19.8). The findings indicated that attention should be paid not only to the child's dental health care but also to that of the whole family. Parents should be supported in their upbringing efforts and encouraged to improve their children's dental health habits. In everyday life, parents function as role models for their children, and therefore, parents' own dental hygiene habits are very meaningful.
PubMed ID
10765963 View in PubMed
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Caries risk profiles of 12-13-year-old children in Laos and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29693
Source
Oral Health Prev Dent. 2005;3(1):15-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
G L Tayanin
G Hänsel Petersson
D. Bratthall
Author Affiliation
WHO Collaborating Centre, Department of Cariology, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Sweden.
Source
Oral Health Prev Dent. 2005;3(1):15-23
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Analysis of Variance
Cariostatic Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Comparative Study
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Diet, Cariogenic
Female
Fluorides - therapeutic use
Humans
Lactobacillus - isolation & purification
Laos - epidemiology
Male
Oral Hygiene Index
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Saliva - microbiology - physiology
Software
Statistics, nonparametric
Streptococcus mutans - isolation & purification
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
PURPOSE: To analyse caries risk factors of 12-13-year-old children living in Laos, using the computer program Cariogram to illustrate the caries risk profile. In addition, to compare the results with a study performed in Sweden. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred Laotian and 392 Swedish children were included. Interviews were performed to obtain information on diet intake and fluoride use. Saliva was analysed for mutans streptococci, lactobacilli and secretion rate/buffering capacity. Oral hygiene was assessed using the Silness and Löe criteria. Caries prevalence was recorded according to WHO. The data were entered into the Cariogram to determine each child's caries risk, expressed as 'the chance of avoiding caries'. The children were divided into five risk groups. RESULTS: Mean DMFT level of the Laotian children was 4.61 +/- 2.95 and 1.38 +/- 1.97 in the Swedish group. For the risk factors plaque amount, frequency of food intake, saliva secretion rate, buffering capacity and fluoride, the Laotian children had significantly less favourable values compared to the Swedes. Only 6% of Laotian children belonged to the Cariogram low risk group versus 40% of the Swedish children. The mean DMFT for the five Cariogram groups was (from low to high risk) 0.00, 3.00, 3.56, 5.66, 6.11 for the Lao children and 0.31, 1.39, 2.56, 3.03, 2.91 for the Swedish ones. The mean chance of avoiding caries was 37.3% for the Laotians and 69.2% for the Swedish children (p
PubMed ID
15921333 View in PubMed
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Cariogram--a multifactorial risk assessment model for a multifactorial disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29614
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2005 Aug;33(4):256-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
Douglas Bratthall
Gunnel Hänsel Petersson
Author Affiliation
Department of Cariology, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden. douglas.bratthall@od.mah.se
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2005 Aug;33(4):256-64
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Algorithms
Child
Computer simulation
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology - etiology
Dental Caries Susceptibility
Dental Plaque - microbiology
Diet, Cariogenic
Humans
Lactobacillus - isolation & purification
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Models, Biological
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sensitivity and specificity
Socioeconomic Factors
Streptococcus mutans - isolation & purification
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This paper reviews some common methods for the assessment of caries risk. It also describes a new way of illustrating the caries risk profile of an individual, the Cariogram. Past caries experience and socioeconomic factors are often used for prediction of caries. As prediction models, the methods are simple, inexpensive and fast. However, they are not risk models, as they do not specify which particular risk factors are operating. Various biological factors can be used for risk assessment. Common ones are bacteria, diet and host factors. Taken separately, these biological factors often have limited predictive values. Socioeconomic factors often have a heavy impact on the biological factors as they can explain why an individual, for example, has a cariogenic diet or neglects oral hygiene. The biological factors are the immediate cause of the cavities. Caries experience is an illustration of how the host copes up with the biological activity. To facilitate the interpretation of biological data, the Cariogram was developed. It is a computer program showing a graphical picture that illustrates a possible overall caries risk scenario. The program contains an algorithm that presents a 'weighted' analysis of the input data, mainly biological factors. It expresses as to what extent different etiological factors of caries affect caries risk. The Cariogram identifies the caries risk factors for the individual and provides examples of preventive and treatment strategies to the clinician.
PubMed ID
16008632 View in PubMed
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Causes, treatment and prevention of early childhood caries: a microbiologic perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4789
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2003 May;69(5):304-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
Robert J Berkowitz
Author Affiliation
Eastman Department of Dentistry, School of Medicine and Dentistry, Eastman Dental Center, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14620, USA. Robert_Berkowitz@urmc.Rochester.edu
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2003 May;69(5):304-7
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Infective Agents, Local - therapeutic use
Bottle Feeding - adverse effects
Child, Preschool
Dental Caries - economics - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Diet, Cariogenic
Disease Transmission, Vertical
Early Intervention (Education)
Guidelines
Health Education, Dental
Hispanic Americans
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Mothers
Povidone-Iodine - therapeutic use
Prevalence
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Streptococcal Infections - transmission
Streptococcus mutans - pathogenicity
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Early childhood caries (ECC) is a virulent form of dental caries that can destroy the primary dentition of toddlers and preschool children. It occurs worldwide, afflicting predominantly disadvantaged children. High-risk North American populations include Hispanic and Native American children, as well as children enrolled in Head Start, a federally funded program for preschool children living in poverty. The prevalence of EEC among these children ranges from 11% to 72%. ECC is an infectious disease, and Streptococcus mutans is the most likely causative agent; diet also plays a critical role in the acquisition and clinical expression of this infection. Early acquisition of S. mutans is a key event in the natural history of the disease. Acquisition may occur via vertical or horizontal transmission. Primary oral colonization by S. mutans coupled with caries-promoting feeding behaviours results in accumulation of these organisms to levels exceeding 30% of the total cultivable plaque flora which in turn leads to rapid demineralization of tooth structure. Treatment of ECC is costly because the cooperative capacity of babies and preschool children usually necessitates the use of general anesthesia. Treatment usually consists of restoration or surgical removal of carious teeth along with recommendations regarding feeding habits. However, this approach has resulted in unacceptable clinical outcomes, and relapse rates of approximately 40% have been reported within the first year after dental surgery. Primary prevention of ECC has largely been restricted to counselling parents about caries-promoting feeding behaviours. This approach has also had minimal success. Newer strategies addressing the infectious component through use of topical antimicrobial therapy appear promising.
PubMed ID
12734024 View in PubMed
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67 records – page 1 of 7.