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A 2 year multidomain intervention of diet, exercise, cognitive training, and vascular risk monitoring versus control to prevent cognitive decline in at-risk elderly people (FINGER): a randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264224
Source
Lancet. 2015 Jun 6;385(9984):2255-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-6-2015
Author
Tiia Ngandu
Jenni Lehtisalo
Alina Solomon
Esko Levälahti
Satu Ahtiluoto
Riitta Antikainen
Lars Bäckman
Tuomo Hänninen
Antti Jula
Tiina Laatikainen
Jaana Lindström
Francesca Mangialasche
Teemu Paajanen
Satu Pajala
Markku Peltonen
Rainer Rauramaa
Anna Stigsdotter-Neely
Timo Strandberg
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Hilkka Soininen
Miia Kivipelto
Source
Lancet. 2015 Jun 6;385(9984):2255-63
Date
Jun-6-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cognition Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diet
Double-Blind Method
Exercise
Exercise Therapy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests
Risk assessment
Vascular Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Modifiable vascular and lifestyle-related risk factors have been associated with dementia risk in observational studies. In the Finnish Geriatric Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability (FINGER), a proof-of-concept randomised controlled trial, we aimed to assess a multidomain approach to prevent cognitive decline in at-risk elderly people from the general population.
In a double-blind randomised controlled trial we enrolled individuals aged 60-77 years recruited from previous national surveys. Inclusion criteria were CAIDE (Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Aging and Dementia) Dementia Risk Score of at least 6 points and cognition at mean level or slightly lower than expected for age. We randomly assigned participants in a 1:1 ratio to a 2 year multidomain intervention (diet, exercise, cognitive training, vascular risk monitoring), or a control group (general health advice). Computer-generated allocation was done in blocks of four (two individuals randomly allocated to each group) at each site. Group allocation was not actively disclosed to participants and outcome assessors were masked to group allocation. The primary outcome was change in cognition as measured through comprehensive neuropsychological test battery (NTB) Z score. Analysis was by modified intention to treat (all participants with at least one post-baseline observation). This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01041989.
Between Sept 7, 2009, and Nov 24, 2011, we screened 2654 individuals and randomly assigned 1260 to the intervention group (n=631) or control group (n=629). 591 (94%) participants in the intervention group and 599 (95%) in the control group had at least one post-baseline assessment and were included in the modified intention-to-treat analysis. Estimated mean change in NTB total Z score at 2 years was 0·20 (SE 0·02, SD 0·51) in the intervention group and 0·16 (0·01, 0·51) in the control group. Between-group difference in the change of NTB total score per year was 0·022 (95% CI 0·002-0·042, p=0·030). 153 (12%) individuals dropped out overall. Adverse events occurred in 46 (7%) participants in the intervention group compared with six (1%) participants in the control group; the most common adverse event was musculoskeletal pain (32 [5%] individuals for intervention vs no individuals for control).
Findings from this large, long-term, randomised controlled trial suggest that a multidomain intervention could improve or maintain cognitive functioning in at-risk elderly people from the general population.
Academy of Finland, La Carita Foundation, Alzheimer Association, Alzheimer's Research and Prevention Foundation, Juho Vainio Foundation, Novo Nordisk Foundation, Finnish Social Insurance Institution, Ministry of Education and Culture, Salama bint Hamdan Al Nahyan Foundation, Axa Research Fund, EVO funding for University Hospitals of Kuopio, Oulu, and Turku and for Seinäjoki Central Hospital and Oulu City Hospital, Swedish Research Council, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, and af Jochnick Foundation.
Notes
Comment In: Nat Rev Neurol. 2015 May;11(5):24825799934
PubMed ID
25771249 View in PubMed
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A 4-fold risk of metabolic syndrome in patients with schizophrenia: the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49604
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2005 May;66(5):559-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
Kaisa M Saari
Sari M Lindeman
Kaisa M Viilo
Matti K Isohanni
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
Liisa H Laurén
Markku J Savolainen
Hannu J Koponen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Oulu, PO Box 5000, 90014 Oulu, Finland. kaisa.saari@oulu.fi
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2005 May;66(5):559-63
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Diet Therapy
Exercise
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - epidemiology - prevention & control - therapy
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Weight Loss
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Schizophrenia is associated with a shortened life expectancy and increased somatic comorbidity with, e.g., cardiovascular disorders. One major risk factor for these disorders is the metabolic syndrome, which has been reported to have a higher frequency in schizophrenic patients. Our objective was to study the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in a population-based birth cohort. METHOD: The study sample consisted of 5613 members of the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort who participated in the field study from 1997 to 1998. Subjects were divided into 4 diagnostic categories (DSM-III-R): (1) schizophrenia (N = 31), (2) other functional psychoses (N = 22), (3) nonpsychotic disorders (N = 105), and (4) no psychiatric hospital treatment (N = 5455, comparison group). Subjects were assessed for the presence of metabolic syndrome according to the criteria of the National Cholesterol Education Program. RESULTS: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was higher in subjects with schizophrenia compared with the comparison group (19% vs. 6%, p = .010). The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in subjects with other psychoses was 5%. After controlling for sex, the results of logistic regression analysis showed that the risk of metabolic syndrome in schizophrenia was 3.7 (95% CI = 1.5 to 9.0). CONCLUSIONS: The high prevalence of metabolic syndrome in schizophrenia even at such a relatively young age underscores the need to select antipsychotic medications with no or little capability to induce metabolic side effects. Also, developing comprehensive efforts directed at controlling weight and diet and improving physical activity are needed.
PubMed ID
15889940 View in PubMed
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4-Nonylphenol and bisphenol A in Swedish food and exposure in Swedish nursing women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125631
Source
Environ Int. 2012 Aug;43:21-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Irina Gyllenhammar
Anders Glynn
Per Ola Darnerud
Sanna Lignell
Rob van Delft
Marie Aune
Author Affiliation
National Food Agency, P.O. Box 622, 75126 Uppsala, Sweden. irina.gyllenhammar@slv.se
Source
Environ Int. 2012 Aug;43:21-8
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Benzhydryl Compounds
Breast Feeding - statistics & numerical data
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Endocrine Disruptors - analysis - blood - metabolism
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - blood - metabolism
Female
Food analysis
Food Contamination - statistics & numerical data
Fruit - chemistry
Humans
Maternal Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Meat - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Phenols - analysis - blood - metabolism
Sweden
Vegetables - chemistry
Young Adult
Abstract
4-Nonylphenol (NP) and bisphenol A (BPA) are phenolic substances used in high volumes by the industry. Studies on cells and in experimental animals have shown that both these compounds can be classified as estrogenic hormone disrupters. Information about the exposure of humans to NP and BPA is still scarce, especially regarding levels in human blood. The first aim of this study was to investigate possible sources of NP and BPA exposure from food, by analyzing the levels of NP and BPA from a Swedish food market basket, based on the Swedish per capita food consumption. A second aim was to investigate blood serum levels of NP and BPA, as well as NP-ethoxylates, among young women in Sweden (n=100). Moreover, associations between food consumption and blood NP and BPA levels were studied. In food, NP was to some extent found at levels above limit of quantification (LOQ 20 ng/g fresh weight) in fruits, cereal products, vegetables, and potatoes. BPA levels above LOQ (2 ng/g fresh weight) were found in fish, meats, potatoes, and dairy products. The estimated mean intakes per capita were (medium bound) 27 µg NP/day and 3.9 µg BPA/day, showing that food is a source of BPA and NP in the general Swedish population. In blood serum, free NP above limit of detection (LOD 0.5 ng/g) was detected in 46% of the study participants while detectable levels of total NP (LOD 0.8 ng/g) were observed in 43%. The corresponding percentages for BPA were 25% and 22%, respectively. The results indicate that there is a continuous source of exposure to NP and BPA that is high enough for free NP and BPA to be detected in some consumers. Among the participants with quantifiable levels of free and total NP (n=38), 85% (median, range: 38-112%) of the NP was present as free NP. For BPA 76% (49-109%) was detected as free BPA (n=15). All women had levels of ethoxylates of NP below LOD (0.1-0.7 ng/g). A significantly higher total consumption of fruits and vegetables was reported in questionnaires by participants with NP levels at or above LOD than among women with levels below LOD. This result is supporting the market basket results of relatively high NP levels in these types of food.
PubMed ID
22466019 View in PubMed
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[4 weeks in Vindeln teaches patients to eat, live and get good exercise. Interview by Anita Widén.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50401
Source
Vardfacket. 1984 Mar 8;8(5):8-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-8-1984

A 5-year longitudinal study of the relationship between the wish to be thinner, lifestyle behaviours and disturbed eating in 9-20-year old girls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99387
Source
Eur Eat Disord Rev. 2010 May;18(3):207-19
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Josefin Westerberg-Jacobson
Birgitta Edlund
Ata Ghaderi
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Uppsala University, BMC, Husargatan, Uppsala, Sweden. josefin.westerberg-jacobson@pubcare.uu.se
Source
Eur Eat Disord Rev. 2010 May;18(3):207-19
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body Image
Body mass index
Child
Diet, Reducing - psychology
Eating Disorders - prevention & control - psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Life Style
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sedentary lifestyle
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this 5-year longitudinal study of 593 girls (9-20-year-old) was to examine whether the internalization of the thinness ideal in terms of 'a wish to be thinner' might be related to lifestyle factors and longitudinally increase the risk of disturbed eating over time. Results showed that a wish to be thinner was related to lifestyle factors, eating attitudes and body mass index (BMI) longitudinally. Girls who wished to be thinner dieted more often, thought that they would be more popular if they were thinner, skipped meals, were eating breakfast more often alone and had a higher BMI compared to the girls without such a wish. Girls who wished to be thinner were 4 times more likely to develop disturbed eating attitudes over a 5-year period. These findings point to the importance of helping adolescents to establish regular eating habits, to avoid unhealthy dieting practices and to prevent sedentary behaviours that might lead to overweight and or obesity in early childhood.
PubMed ID
20443204 View in PubMed
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13C evidence for dietary habits of prehistoric man in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62404
Source
Nature. 1981 Jul 23;292(5821):332-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-23-1981
Author
H. Tauber
Source
Nature. 1981 Jul 23;292(5821):332-3
Date
Jul-23-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bone and Bones - analysis
Carbon Isotopes
Collagen - analysis
Denmark
Diet
History, Ancient
History, Medieval
PubMed ID
7019718 View in PubMed
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A 24-week dietary and physical activity lifestyle intervention reduces hepatic insulin resistance in the obese with chronic hepatitis C.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117638
Source
Liver Int. 2013 Mar;33(3):410-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Venessa Pattullo
Andres Duarte-Rojo
Wael Soliman
Florencia Vargas-Vorackova
Sanjeev Sockalingam
Ivan G Fantus
Johane Allard
Jenny Heathcote
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
Liver Int. 2013 Mar;33(3):410-9
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropometry
Basal Metabolism
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Exercise Therapy - methods
Female
Hepatitis C, Chronic - complications - pathology
Humans
Insulin Resistance - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity - physiology
Obesity - complications - diet therapy - therapy
Ontario
Prospective Studies
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
Obesity- and virus-mediated insulin resistance (IR) are associated with adverse hepatic and metabolic outcomes in chronic hepatitis C (CHC). This study evaluates the tolerability and effects of a dietary and physical activity (PA) intervention in obese patients with insulin-resistant CHC.
Obese patients (body mass index, BMI =30 kg/m(2) ) with CHC were recruited prospectively. Non-diabetic patients with IR (homeostasis model assessment of IR, HOMA-IR >2.0) proceeded to a 24-week lifestyle intervention comprising pedometer monitored increase in PA (=10 000 steps/day) and an individualised dietary plan.
Ten non-cirrhotic and six cirrhotic patients [age 52 ± 8.5 years, BMI 35.9 (31.46-38.21)kg/m(2) ] were recruited, of whom all 16 (100%) completed the 24-week protocol. Increase in PA from 6853 (2440-9533) to 10 697 (7959-13566) steps/day (P = 0.001) and reduction in caloric intake from 2263 (1805.4-2697.0) to 1281 (1099.5-1856.3) kcal/day (equivalent to reduction of median 33% (25.3-49.8%), P
PubMed ID
23278982 View in PubMed
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25-Hydroxyvitamin D in Canadian adults: biological, environmental, and behavioral correlates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141385
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2011 May;22(5):1389-99
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
L S Greene-Finestone
C. Berger
M. de Groh
D A Hanley
N. Hidiroglou
K. Sarafin
S. Poliquin
J. Krieger
J B Richards
D. Goltzman
Author Affiliation
Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. linda.greene-finestone@phac-aspc.gc.ca
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2011 May;22(5):1389-99
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Body mass index
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Dietary Supplements
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications - epidemiology
Seasons
Sex Distribution
Skin Pigmentation - physiology
Sunlight
Vitamin D - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
We assessed vitamin D status and its correlates in the population-based Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos). Results showed that serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels
PubMed ID
20730415 View in PubMed
Less detail

25(OH)D levels in trained versus sedentary university students at 64° north.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290407
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1314414
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
2017
Author
Scott P Jerome
Kendra D Sticka
Theresia M Schnurr
Sally J Mangum
Arleigh J Reynolds
Kriya L Dunlap
Author Affiliation
a Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry , University of Alaska Fairbanks , Fairbanks , AK , USA.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1314414
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Arctic Regions
Athletes - statistics & numerical data
Body Weights and Measures
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Dietary Supplements
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Humans
Male
Metabolic Equivalent
Sedentary lifestyle
Students
Sunlight
Universities
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) deficiency is associated with compromised bone mineralisation, fatigue, suppressed immune function and unsatisfactory skeletal muscle recovery. We investigated the risk of 25(OH)D insufficiency or deficiency in endurance athletes compared to sedentary non-athletes living at 64° north.
University student-athletes (TS) and sedentary students (SS) volunteered to participate in this study. TS engaged in regular exercise while SS exercised no more than 20 minutes/week. Metabolic Equivalent of Task (MET) scores for participants were determined. Vitamin D intake was assessed using the National Cancer Institute's 24-hour food recall (ASA24). Fasting plasma 25(OH)D levels were quantified via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.
TS reported higher activity levels than SS as assessed with MET-minutes/week and ranking of physical activity levels (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
28452288 View in PubMed
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85-year-olds in Denmark. The socio-psychological conditions and general health and disorders in a representative group of 85-year-old Danes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62157
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1992 Jun;39(3):207-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1992
Author
J. Ingerslev
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine C, Glostrup Hospital Faculty of Medicine.
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1992 Jun;39(3):207-11
Date
Jun-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Comparative Study
Denmark
Diet
Female
Health status
Humans
Life Style
Male
Mental health
Morbidity
Oral Health
Psychology, Social
Quality of Life
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
A population of persons born in 1897 and resident in Glostrup and eight surrounding municipalities was investigated when these persons were 70, 80 and 85 years old. Some of the results are mentioned from the cross-sectional, epidemiological survey on the socio-psychological conditions and general health and disorders in this representative population which includes almost 2% of the Danish 85-year-olds. The examination programme was extensive, and of data rather comprehensive. The aim of this article is to make known some of the information, observations and results of several tests performed, including 56 different laboratory tests and nutritional analyses. It is worth mentioning that about three fourths of the 85-year-olds were self-reliant and contended with their actual life and lifestyle. Nevertheless suggestions or recommendations for interventions were given to 85% of the participants as well as the general practitioners. The data have already formed the basis of several frames of references.
PubMed ID
1638877 View in PubMed
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6113 records – page 1 of 612.