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82 records – page 1 of 9.

[4 years after Chernobyl: medical repercussions]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25355
Source
Bull Cancer. 1990;77(5):419-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
D. Hubert
Source
Bull Cancer. 1990;77(5):419-28
Date
1990
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Abortion, Habitual - epidemiology
Blood Cell Count
Bone Marrow Transplantation
Decontamination - methods
Diarrhea - etiology
English Abstract
Europe
Female
Humans
Male
Nuclear Reactors
Pregnancy
Prognosis
Psychophysiologic Disorders - etiology
Pulmonary Fibrosis - etiology
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Injuries - complications - epidemiology - therapy
Skin - radiation effects
Triage
Ukraine
Abstract
The nuclear accident at Chernobyl accounted for an acute radiation syndrome in 237 persons on the site. Triage was the initial problem and was carried out according to clinical and biological criteria; evaluating the doses received was based on these criteria. Thirty one persons died and only 1 survived a dose higher than 6 Gy. Skin radiation burns which were due to inadequate decontamination, greatly worsened prognosis. The results of 13 bone marrow transplantations were disappointing, with only 2 survivors. Some time after the accident, these severely irradiated patients are mainly suffering from psychosomatic disorders, in the USSR, some areas have been significantly contaminated and several measures were taken to mitigate the impact on population: evacuating 135,000 persons, distributing prophylactic iodine, establishing standards and controls on foodstuff. Radiation phobia syndrome which developed in many persons, is the only sanitary effect noticed up to now. Finally, in Europe, there was only an increase in induced abortions and this was totally unwarranted. If we consider the risk of radiation induced cancer, an effect might not be demonstrated.
PubMed ID
2205311 View in PubMed
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[A case from general practice (10): Acute diarrhea during foreign travel].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220873
Source
Z Arztl Fortbild (Jena). 1993 Jun 12;87(6):523-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-12-1993
Author
H. Berndt
Author Affiliation
Klinik für Innere Medizin (Charité), Humboldt-Universität, Berlin.
Source
Z Arztl Fortbild (Jena). 1993 Jun 12;87(6):523-4
Date
Jun-12-1993
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diagnosis, Differential
Diarrhea - etiology
Duodenal Ulcer - complications - diagnosis
Humans
Male
Moscow
Peptic Ulcer Hemorrhage - complications - diagnosis
Travel
PubMed ID
8333219 View in PubMed
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Advanced cancer patients' self-assessed physical and emotional problems on admission and discharge from hospital general wards--a questionnaire study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125804
Source
Eur J Cancer Care (Engl). 2012 Sep;21(5):667-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
L. Soelver
B. Oestergaard
S. Rydahl-Hansen
L. Wagner
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery K, Bispebjerg Hospital, Bispebjeg Bakke 23, Copenhagen, Denmark. lsoe0012@bbh.regionh.dk
Source
Eur J Cancer Care (Engl). 2012 Sep;21(5):667-76
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark
Diarrhea - etiology - therapy
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, General - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - complications - psychology - therapy
Pain - etiology
Pain Management - standards
Palliative Care - standards
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Stress, Psychological - etiology - therapy
Terminally ill
Abstract
Most cancer patients receiving life-prolonging or palliative treatment are offered non-specialist palliative services. There is a lack of knowledge about their problem profile. The aim of this article is to describe the incidence of patient-reported physical and emotional problems on admission and discharge from general hospital wards and health staff's reported intervention. A prospective study was undertaken over 12 months, where advanced cancer patients completed a patient questionnaire, EORTC QLQ C15-PAL, on admission (n= 97) and discharge (n= 46). The incidences of the problems were dichotomised in intensity categories. The average number of 'clinically relevant problems' on admission was 5 (SD 2) and on discharge 4 (SD 2). A Wilcoxon signed rank test showed significant change in mean score for six out of nine problem areas, but the majority of the patients did not move to the lower intensity category. The highest concurrence was between patient-reported problems and reported intervention for physical function, pain, constipation and loss of appetite. Palliative cancer patients' self-reported problem profile on admission and discharge from hospital has not previously been described and the results indicate a need to focus on improvements to palliative services and for a special service for pain and constipation that could prevent some admissions.
PubMed ID
22452383 View in PubMed
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Aging with a spinal cord injury: factors associated with the need for more help with activities of daily living.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178069
Source
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2004 Oct;85(10):1567-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Nathania R Liem
Mary Ann McColl
Will King
Karen M Smith
Author Affiliation
Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada. n_liem@tricolour.queensu.ca
Source
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2004 Oct;85(10):1567-77
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Age Factors
Aging - physiology
Canada
Constipation - etiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diarrhea - etiology
England
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Pressure Ulcer - etiology
Sampling Studies
Sex Factors
Spinal Cord Injuries - complications - physiopathology - rehabilitation
Time Factors
United States
Abstract
To determine (1) the frequency of the need for more help with activities of daily living (ADLs), (2) the frequency of medical complications, and (3) the association between medical, injury-related, and sociodemographic factors and the need for more help with ADLs among those aging with spinal cord injury (SCI).
Cross-sectional survey.
General community, international.
Volunteers (N=352) with SCI for more than 20 years.
Not applicable.
The need for more help with ADLs.
The need for more help with ADLs during the last 3 years was reported by 32.1% of participants. At least 1 medical complication was reported by 85%. Constipation (47.9%), diarrhea/bowel accidents (41.8%), and pressure ulcers (38.7%) were common. Constipation, pressure ulcers, female gender, and years postinjury were associated with needing more help with ADLs. Constipation and pressure ulcers were associated with a 97% and a 76% increase, respectively, in the likelihood of needing more help with ADLs during a 3-year time period. Female gender was associated with a 96% increased odds of needing more help with ADLs. There was a 42% increased odds of needing more help with ADLs per decade after SCI.
People aging with SCI are vulnerable to medical complications, and additional help is required to function. Knowledge of the effect of these factors, particularly the tetrad of constipation, pressure ulcers, female gender, and number of years postinjury, should increase awareness that more help with ADLs may be needed over time.
PubMed ID
15468013 View in PubMed
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Antimicrobial agents and Clostridium difficile in acute enteric disease: epidemiological data from Sweden, 1980-1982.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature39599
Source
J Infect Dis. 1985 Mar;151(3):476-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1985
Author
B. Aronsson
R. Möllby
C E Nord
Source
J Infect Dis. 1985 Mar;151(3):476-81
Date
Mar-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - adverse effects
Bacterial Proteins
Bacterial Toxins - analysis
Carrier State - epidemiology
Cephalosporins - adverse effects
Child
Clostridium - isolation & purification
Clostridium Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Diarrhea - etiology - microbiology
Enterocolitis, Pseudomembranous - microbiology
Feces - microbiology
Female
Humans
Macrolides
Male
Middle Aged
Penicillins - adverse effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Sweden
Abstract
The carrier rate of Clostridium difficile in an adult Swedish population was found to be 11 (1.9%) of 594. All isolates were toxigenic in vitro, but no healthy individual harbored free cytotoxin in stool. Of 398 patients with acute diarrhea not associated with antibiotic use, cytotoxin was found in stool filtrates of four (1%). In 4,793 patients with antibiotic-associated diarrhea from all parts of Sweden during 1980-1982, C. difficile cytotoxin was demonstrated in 873 (18%). The tissue culture assay was found to be more specific than cultivation for the bacterium. By weighted analysis, in the age group greater than 70 years more women than men were infected. In the age group 21-50 years there was an even greater preponderance of infection in women than in men. Cephalosporins and lincosamides were 10-70 times more often implicated in C. difficile colitis than were narrow-spectrum penicillins.
PubMed ID
3973405 View in PubMed
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Arctic trichinosis presenting as prolonged diarrhea.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2577
Source
Gastoenterology. 1986 Oct; 91(4):938-946.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1986
Author
J. Viallet
J D MacLean
C A Goresky
M. Staudt
G. Routhier
C. Law
Author Affiliation
McGill University
Source
Gastoenterology. 1986 Oct; 91(4):938-946.
Date
1986
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Salluit
Trichinosis
Diet, traditional
Epidemics
Trichinella spiralis
Adult
Animals
Arctic Regions
Diarrhea - etiology
Disease Outbreaks - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Inuits
Male
Meat
Middle Aged
Pinnipedia - parasitology
Time Factors
Trichinellosis - complications - epidemiology - transmission
Walruses - parasitology
Abstract
We describe an outbreak of trichinosis after the consumption of raw walrus meat in 10 Inuit inhabitants of a northern community. During the presentation of the illness, diarrhea was found in all subjects and was the dominant symptom in 8 of the 10 cases. Myalgia (60%) and muscle weakness (50%) were much less prominent complaints. The diarrhea was characteristically prolonged, lasting up to 14 wk (average 5.8 wk), as opposed to comparatively short episodes of myalgia (average 5.4 days) and muscle weakness (average 4.5 days). Prolonged diarrhea with little or no muscle symptomatology in an epidemic form represents a previously unrecognized clinical presentation of trichinosis. It remains to be determined whether this new clinical presentation is related to variant biological behavior of arctic Trichinella, to previous exposure to the parasite, or to other factors.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2121.
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Bowel function among people 75+ reporting faecal incontinence in relation to help seeking, dependency and quality of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78574
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2007 Mar;16(3):458-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Stenzelius Karin
Westergren Albert
Hallberg Ingalill R
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Lund University and Department of Urology, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2007 Mar;16(3):458-68
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Constipation - etiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diarrhea - etiology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Fecal Incontinence - complications - prevention & control - psychology
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Needs Assessment
Nursing Assessment
Nursing Methodology Research
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Sweden
Abstract
AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The aim was to compare faecal incontinence and related bowel symptoms among men and women and being dependent or not (aged >or=75 years) and furthermore to identify which bowel symptoms predicted help seeking, dependency and low quality of life (QoL). BACKGROUND: Faecal incontinence (FI) in old age is a common condition and influences daily life to a great extent, although few actually seek medical help. METHODS: A total of 248 people with reported difficulties controlling faeces answered a postal questionnaire or were interviewed with questions about FI-related bowel symptoms. A factor analysis resulted in four areas of bowel symptoms and was used in logistic regression with help seeking, dependency and low QoL as dependent variables. RESULTS: Of all the subjects, 56.4% had leakage, 54.7% did not reach the toilet in time, 55.6% had incomplete emptying, 27.9% had hard stool, 36.8% bother from moisture from the anus, 32.2% could not withstand urgency for five minutes and 17% had red skin or wounds in the genital region. Women and those dependent were most affected. Totally 40.8% had sought help and 30.1% used protective aids. Leakage, discomfort, consistency and contractibility symptoms were the categories of bowel symptoms related to FI. Discomfort predicted help seeking (OR 3.0), dependency (OR 1.5) and physical QoL (OR 1.7). Leakage predicted help seeking (OR 1.9) but not dependency and QoL. CONCLUSIONS: Overall bowel function was disturbed among those with FI and unmet needs seem problematic especially for women and those needing help in Activities of Daily Living (ADL). Encouragement to seek and get medical help and to use protective aids may improve the very low quality of life in this group. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Older people with FI should be asked about, assessed for and examined for overall bowel function to get adequate treatment and be encouraged to use protection.
PubMed ID
17335521 View in PubMed
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Campylobacter enterocolitis in a neonatal nursery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240430
Source
J Infect Dis. 1984 Jun;149(6):874-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1984
Author
M A Karmali
B. Norrish
H. Lior
B. Heyes
A. Monteath
H. Montgomery
Source
J Infect Dis. 1984 Jun;149(6):874-7
Date
Jun-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Campylobacter Infections - genetics - transmission
Campylobacter fetus - classification - isolation & purification
Canada
Cross Infection
Diarrhea - etiology - genetics
Enterocolitis, Pseudomembranous - etiology
Feces - microbiology
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Labor, Obstetric
Male
Nurseries, Hospital
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious
Serotyping
Abstract
During a five-day period, four neonates in a neonatal nursery developed Campylobacter entercolitis. Investigations suggested that cross-infection or common-source infection were unlikely and that the neonates acquired their infection during delivery from their respective mothers, three of whom were also found to harbour Campylobacter jejuni in their stools. This suggestion was confirmed with use of the Lior serotyping system in a blind fashion. Each neonate was infected with a different serotype, and each of the three culture-positive mothers had the same serotype as her neonate. Examination of multiple colonies from the stools of five individuals showed that each was likely to have been infected by only one serotype. The presenting clinical features in the four neonates provides further evidence that neonatal Campylobacter entercolitis typically manifests as a benign, self-limited, nonfebrile, diarrheal illness with bloody stools.
PubMed ID
6736679 View in PubMed
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Childhood diarrhoea in Danish day care centres could be associated with infant colic, low birthweight and antibiotics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276818
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2016 Jan;105(1):90-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Betina Hebbelstrup Jensen
Dennis Röser
Bente Utoft Andreassen
Katharina E P Olsen
Henrik Vedel Nielsen
Bent Bjørn Roldgaard
Susanne Schjørring
Hengameh Chloé Mirsepasi-Lauridsen
Steffen L Jørgensen
Esben Munk Mortensen
Andreas Munk Petersen
Karen Angeliki Krogfelt
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2016 Jan;105(1):90-5
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - adverse effects
Child Day Care Centers
Child, Preschool
Colic - complications
Denmark
Diarrhea - etiology
Diarrhea, Infantile - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Male
Odds Ratio
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Diarrhoea is very common in children attending day care centres. The aim of this study was to examine certain predisposing risk factors for an association with diarrhoea, including foreign travel, treatment with antibiotics, having household pets, infant colic, bottle feeding, using a pacifier and low birthweight.
A dynamic one-year follow-up cohort study comprising 179 children from 36 day care centres was conducted from September 2009 to July 2013 in Copenhagen, Denmark. Questionnaires were sent to the children's parents or legal guardians every two months for a year, requesting information on gastrointestinal symptoms and exposure. A logistic regression was performed to identify the odds ratios of different risk factors for diarrhoea.
The odds ratios for diarrhoea were 1.97 (0.93-4.20) for children with a history of infant colic, 1.91 (0.90-4.04) for low birthweight children and 1.45 (0.74-2.82) for children who had used antibiotics. Having a pet in the household had a possible protective effect towards diarrhoeal events, with an odds ratio of 0.47 (0.20-1.09).
A history of infant colic, low birthweight, and to a lesser extent antibiotic use, possibly increased the risk of diarrhoea in Danish children in day care centres.
Notes
Comment In: Acta Paediatr. 2016 Jan;105(1):13-426725576
PubMed ID
26355526 View in PubMed
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Clinical and epidemiological features of acute infantile gastroenteritis associated with human rotavirus subgroups 1 and 2.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature39283
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1986 Mar;23(3):551-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1986
Author
I. Uhnoo
L. Svensson
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1986 Mar;23(3):551-5
Date
Mar-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Child
Child, Preschool
Diarrhea - etiology
Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel
Female
Fever - etiology
Gastroenteritis - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Prospective Studies
RNA, Viral - analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rotavirus - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Rotavirus Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Seasons
Sex Factors
Sweden
Vomiting - etiology
Abstract
During a prospective 1-year study rotavirus isolates from 169 children with gastroenteritis were investigated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A total of 118 (70%) of the strains analyzed contained sufficient viral nucleic acid to give visible electrophoretic patterns; 36% were identified as strains belonging to subgroup 1 (short patterns), and 64% were identified as strains belonging to subgroup 2 (long patterns). The two subgroups cocirculated at equal frequencies during the first 7 months of the year, after which subgroup 1 rotavirus completely disappeared. Subgroup 2 rotavirus occurred throughout the year. No significant differences between the subgroups in relation to age or sex distribution were observed. Fever and temperatures exceeding 39 degrees C were significantly more frequent in children who shed rotavirus subgroup 1. Diarrhea and vomiting occurred at similar rates in both groups of patients, but were more pronounced in children who shed rotavirus subgroup 2. One of three dominant electropherotypic variants of subgroup 2 rotavirus was found to be associated with more intense symptoms, higher rates of hospitalization, and a significantly higher frequency of respiratory symptoms; the clinical picture may indicate that this rotavirus electropherotype has higher virulence.
PubMed ID
3007567 View in PubMed
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82 records – page 1 of 9.