Skip header and navigation

Refine By

636 records – page 1 of 64.

[4 years after Chernobyl: medical repercussions]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25355
Source
Bull Cancer. 1990;77(5):419-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
D. Hubert
Source
Bull Cancer. 1990;77(5):419-28
Date
1990
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Abortion, Habitual - epidemiology
Blood Cell Count
Bone Marrow Transplantation
Decontamination - methods
Diarrhea - etiology
English Abstract
Europe
Female
Humans
Male
Nuclear Reactors
Pregnancy
Prognosis
Psychophysiologic Disorders - etiology
Pulmonary Fibrosis - etiology
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Injuries - complications - epidemiology - therapy
Skin - radiation effects
Triage
Ukraine
Abstract
The nuclear accident at Chernobyl accounted for an acute radiation syndrome in 237 persons on the site. Triage was the initial problem and was carried out according to clinical and biological criteria; evaluating the doses received was based on these criteria. Thirty one persons died and only 1 survived a dose higher than 6 Gy. Skin radiation burns which were due to inadequate decontamination, greatly worsened prognosis. The results of 13 bone marrow transplantations were disappointing, with only 2 survivors. Some time after the accident, these severely irradiated patients are mainly suffering from psychosomatic disorders, in the USSR, some areas have been significantly contaminated and several measures were taken to mitigate the impact on population: evacuating 135,000 persons, distributing prophylactic iodine, establishing standards and controls on foodstuff. Radiation phobia syndrome which developed in many persons, is the only sanitary effect noticed up to now. Finally, in Europe, there was only an increase in induced abortions and this was totally unwarranted. If we consider the risk of radiation induced cancer, an effect might not be demonstrated.
PubMed ID
2205311 View in PubMed
Less detail

50 Years Ago in The Journal of Pediatrics: Enteric Disease Due to Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli in Hospitalized Infants in Kotzebue, Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260001
Source
J Pediatr. 2015 Feb;166(2):268
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015

2007 Canadian Association of Gastroenterology Educational Needs Assessment Report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160713
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2007 Aug;21(8):519-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007

Abdominal symptoms among sewage workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10795
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 1998 May;48(4):251-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1998
Author
L. Friis
L. Agréus
C. Edling
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. Lennart.Friis@arbmed.uas.se
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 1998 May;48(4):251-3
Date
May-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diarrhea - epidemiology
Gastrointestinal Diseases - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nausea - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Peptic Ulcer - epidemiology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Sanitary Engineering
Sewage
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The objective of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the prevalence of abdominal symptoms and the abdominal medical history among sewage workers. 142 male sewage workers and 137 male referents in 11 Swedish municipalities were addressed with a questionnaire about abdominal symptoms, medical history, occupational history and life style factors. The sewage workers suffered less from nausea [adjusted odds ratio (adjOR) = 0.18, 95% confidence interval (Cl) 0.04-0.84] than the referents. There was no significant difference in the three months prevalence of diarrhoea (adjOR = 1.7, 95% Cl = 0.79-3.4), dyspepsia (adjOR = 0.85, 95% Cl = 0.49-1.5) or irritable bowel syndrome (adjOR = 1.4, 95% Cl = 0.53-3.5). The sewage workers were affected more often by peptic ulcers during their present jobs than the referents, although the increased risk was not significant (adjOR = 1.4, 95% Cl = 0.31-6.1). The odds ratios were adjusted for age, use of tobacco products and alcohol consumption. The conclusion of this study was that sewage workers are less affected by nausea than comparable referents.
PubMed ID
9800423 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A case from general practice (10): Acute diarrhea during foreign travel].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220873
Source
Z Arztl Fortbild (Jena). 1993 Jun 12;87(6):523-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-12-1993
Author
H. Berndt
Author Affiliation
Klinik für Innere Medizin (Charité), Humboldt-Universität, Berlin.
Source
Z Arztl Fortbild (Jena). 1993 Jun 12;87(6):523-4
Date
Jun-12-1993
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diagnosis, Differential
Diarrhea - etiology
Duodenal Ulcer - complications - diagnosis
Humans
Male
Moscow
Peptic Ulcer Hemorrhage - complications - diagnosis
Travel
PubMed ID
8333219 View in PubMed
Less detail

The acceptance of rice powder and glucose oral solutions in Swedish hospitalized children with acute diarrhoea.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35809
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1994 May;83(5):547
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1994
Source
Journal of Pediatrics. 1981 Aug; 99(2):211-214.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1981
Author
Kaplan, B.S.
Vitullo, B.
Author Affiliation
Montreal Children's Hospital
Source
Journal of Pediatrics. 1981 Aug; 99(2):211-214.
Date
1981
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Electrolytes
Acid-base metabolism
Diet, general
Acquired chloride diarrhea
Alkalosis - complications
Chlorides - metabolism
Diarrhea, Infantile - complications - metabolism
Feces - analysis
Humans
Infant
Inuits
Potassium - metabolism
Sodium - metabolism
Abstract
Seven patients with intractable diarrhea were found to be excreting large quantities of chloride in the stool, associated with metabolic alkalosis, hyponatremia, hypokalemia, hypochloremia, and the excretion of chloride-free urine. They appear to have had an acquired, transient form of chloride diarrhea. We speculate that the diarrhea may have been perpetuated, in part, by fecal loss of chloride.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2573.
Less detail

Acute diarrhoea in adults: aetiology, clinical appearance and therapeutic aspects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73988
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1988;20(3):303-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
B. Svanteson
A. Thorén
B. Castor
G. Barkenius
U. Bergdahl
B. Tufvesson
H B Hansson
R. Möllby
I. Juhlin
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, University of Lund, General Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1988;20(3):303-14
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Campylobacter - isolation & purification
Diarrhea - complications - microbiology - therapy
Feces - microbiology
Female
Fever - etiology
Fluid Therapy
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Seasons
Sweden
Time Factors
Travel
Urban health
Vomiting - etiology
Abstract
A prospective study of acute diarrhoea was performed during 15 months 1981/1982 and included 731 patients and 240 controls. 43% had been infected abroad. A cluster of travellers with bacterial pathogens was diagnosed in July-August. The following pathogens were found: Campylobacter (18%), enterotoxigenic E. coli (6%), Salmonella spp. (5%), rotavirus (4%), Yersinia enterocolitica (3%), Giardia lamblia (3%), Shigella spp. (2%), Clostridium difficile (2%), enteroviruses (2%) and Entamoeba histolytica (less than 1%). More than 90% of the bacterial or parasitic enteropathogens were detected in the first stool sample. Only 10% of the patients needed hospital treatment and for 97% oral fluids were sufficient. The median duration of diarrhoea was 9 days. No fatal cases occurred and only 2 cases of chronic bowel disease were detected.
PubMed ID
3406670 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute gastroenteritis. Changing pattern of clinical features and management.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230275
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1989 Sep;78(5):685-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1989
Author
E. Isolauri
T. Jalonen
M. Mäki
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, University of Tampere, Finland.
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1989 Sep;78(5):685-91
Date
Sep-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Child, Preschool
Diarrhea - diagnosis
Diarrhea, Infantile - diagnosis
Finland
Fluid Therapy
Gastroenteritis - complications - diagnosis - therapy
Hospitalization
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Nutritional Status
Rotavirus Infections - complications - diagnosis - therapy
Water-Electrolyte Imbalance - etiology - therapy
Abstract
During seven epidemics of rotavirus from 1978 to 1987, 575 children younger than 3 years were admitted to hospital with acute gastroenteritis. The management before and during hospitalization, the status on admission and the outcome are reviewed. The mean age of the patients rose significantly during the study period, with the proportion younger than 12 months decreasing from 50 to 26%. Mild to moderate iso-osmolal dehydration was found in most cases, both hypernatraemia and hyponatraemia were rare. The home management had usually consisted of fasting except for "clear fluids". Oral rehydration and rapid feeding in hospital according to modern principles accelerated weight gain, shortened the duration of diarrhoea and the hospital stay and reduced the requirement for intravenous fluid therapy. This experience, together with the current rarity of acute gastroenteritis in young infants and of delay in recovery, suggests that oral rehydration and realimentation should be more extensively used in general practice.
PubMed ID
2596274 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute infectious diarrheal illness in a First Nations community in northern Manitoba, Canada: Epidemiology and the impact of water, sanitation, and housing

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256677
Source
Page 46 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
partnership with a First Nations (FN) Oji-Cree community in northern Manitoba in order to describe the epidemiology and infrastructure determinants of acute infectious diarrhea (AID), and also to build capacity within FN communities to engage in research in order to answer questions of importance to them
  1 document  
Author
Hayward P
Martin B
Hazelton P
Rubinstein E
Orr P
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia
Source
Page 46 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Illness
Water
Sanitation
Housing
First Nations
Canada
Diarrhea
Pathogens
Sewage
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral Presentations. Chapter 1. Public Health Perspectives.
Documents
Less detail

636 records – page 1 of 64.