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Acculturation and self-rated health among Arctic indigenous peoples: a population-based cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119199
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:948
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Bent-Martin Eliassen
Tonje Braaten
Marita Melhus
Ketil Lenert Hansen
Ann Ragnhild Broderstad
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Centre for Sami Health Research, University of Tromsø, Tromsø N-9037, Norway. bent-martin.eliassen@uit.no
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:948
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arctic Regions
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Population Groups - psychology
Qualitative Research
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Acculturation is for indigenous peoples related to the process of colonisation over centuries as well as the on-going social transition experienced in the Arctic today. Changing living conditions and lifestyle affect health in numerous ways in Arctic indigenous populations. Self-rated health (SRH) is a relevant variable in primary health care and in general public health assessments and monitoring. Exploring the relationship between acculturation and SRH in indigenous populations having experienced great societal and cultural change is thus of great importance.
The principal method in the Survey of Living Conditions in the Arctic (SLiCA) was standardised face-to-face interviews using a questionnaire. Very high overall participation rates of 83% were obtained in Greenland and Alaska, whilst a more conventional rate of 57% was achieved in Norway. Acculturation was conceptualised as certain traditional subsistence activities being of lesser importance for people's ethnic identity, and poorer spoken indigenous language ability (SILA). Acculturation was included in six separate gender- and country-specific ordinal logistic regressions to assess qualitative effects on SRH.
Multivariable analyses showed that acculturation significantly predicted poorer SRH in Greenland. An increased subsistence score gave an OR of 2.32 (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
23127197 View in PubMed
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Accumulated occupational class and self-rated health. Can information on previous experience of class further our understanding of the social gradient in health?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116203
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2013 Mar;81:26-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Sara Kjellsson
Author Affiliation
Swedish Institute for Social Research SOFI, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden. sara.kjellsson@sofi.su.se
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2013 Mar;81:26-33
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Female
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Occupations - classification
Sweden
Abstract
Previous research has shown a social gradient in health with better health for people in more advantaged positions in society. This research has mainly been on the relationship between current position and health, or social position in childhood and health, but less is known about the potential accumulative impact of positions held in adulthood. In this paper I use the economic activity histories from the Swedish Level of Living survey to examine the relationship between accumulated occupational class positions and health. Step-wise linear probability models are used to investigate how to best capture the potential association between class experience and self-rated health (SRH), and whether the effect of current class is modified when measures of accumulated class are included. I then further test the potentially lasting association between previous exposure to the health risk of working class by analysing only individuals currently in higher or intermediate level service class; the classes under least exposure. I find a positive association between accumulated experiences of working class and less than good SRH. Furthermore, even for employees currently in non-manual positions the risk for less than good SRH increases with each added year of previous experience within working class. This suggests that the social gradient can be both accumulative and lasting, and that more information on the mechanisms of health disparities can be found by taking detailed information on peoples' pasts into account. Although gender differences in health are not a focus in this paper, results also indicate that the influence of class experiences on health might differ between men and women.
PubMed ID
23422057 View in PubMed
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Adaptation and validation of the Cambridge pulmonary hypertension outcome review for Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119278
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2012 Dec;40(8):777-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Nedim Selimovic
Bengt Rundqvist
Ewa Kjörk
Johan Viriden
James Twiss
Stephen P McKenna
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. nedim.selimovic@vgregion.se
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2012 Dec;40(8):777-83
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adult
Aged
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Female
Humans
Hypertension, Pulmonary - physiopathology - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - methods
Psychometrics
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden
Translating
Young Adult
Abstract
The Cambridge pulmonary hypertension outcome review (CAMPHOR) is the first pulmonary hypertension-specific instrument for the assessment of the patient's perceived symptoms, activity limitations and quality of life (QoL).
To produce and validate a Swedish language version of the CAMPHOR.
Bilingual (n = 5) and lay panels (n = 5) were conducted to translate the CAMPHOR into Swedish. This new questionnaire was then field-tested with 14 patients and finally, it underwent psychometric evaluation by means of a postal validation study involving 38 patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH).
Few problems were experienced in translating the CAMPHOR into Swedish. The field-test participants found the scales relevant, comprehensible and easy to complete. Psychometric analyses showed that the Swedish adaptation was successful. The Swedish CAMPHOR scales had good internal consistency. Cronbach's alpha coefficients were 0.92 for the symptoms scale, 0.92 for activity limitations and 0.95 for the quality of life. Predicted correlations with the Nottingham Health Profile provided evidence of the construct validity of the scales. The Swedish scales also indicated known groups validity.
The Swedish version of the CAMPHOR is a reliable and valid measure of the impact of pulmonary hypertension on the lives of affected patients. It is recommended for use in clinical studies and routine practice in pulmonary hypertension patients.
PubMed ID
23117210 View in PubMed
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Addressing social inequality in aging by the Danish occupational social class measurement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104848
Source
J Aging Health. 2014 Feb;26(1):106-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Ulla Christensen
Rikke Krølner
Charlotte J Nilsson
Pernille W Lyngbye
Charlotte Ø Hougaard
Else Nygaard
Karsten Thielen
Bjørn E Holstein
Kirsten Avlund
Rikke Lund
Author Affiliation
University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Aging Health. 2014 Feb;26(1):106-27
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - physiology
Chronic Disease
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Female
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mobility Limitation
Occupations
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Social Class
Abstract
To present the Danish Occupational Social Class (DOSC) measurement as a measure of socioeconomic position (SEP) applicable in a late midlife population, and to analyze associations of this measure with three aging-related outcomes in midlife, adjusting for education.
Systematic coding procedures of the DOSC measurement were applied to 7,084 participants from the Copenhagen Aging and Midlife Biobank (CAMB) survey. We examined the association of this measure of SEP with chronic conditions, self-rated health, and mobility in logistic regression analyses, adjusting for school education in the final analysis.
The measure of SEP showed a strong social gradient along the social classes in terms of prevalence of chronic conditions, poor self-rated health, and mobility limitations. Adjusting for school education attenuated the association only to a minor degree.
The DOSC measure was associated with aging-related outcomes in a midlife Danish population, and is, thus, well suited for future epidemiological research on social inequalities in health and aging.
PubMed ID
24584263 View in PubMed
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Adolescent reserve capacity, socioeconomic status and school achievement as predictors of mortality in Finland - a longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291125
Source
BMC Public Health. 2017 12 28; 17(1):980
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-28-2017
Author
Paulyn Jean Acacio-Claro
Leena Kristiina Koivusilta
Judith Rafaelita Borja
Arja Hannele Rimpelä
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Sciences, Health Sciences, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. Claro.Paulyn.J@student.uta.fi.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2017 12 28; 17(1):980
Date
12-28-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Academic Success
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Behavior
Health Surveys
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mortality - trends
Social Class
Social Support
Abstract
Despite robust evidence on the inverse relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and mortality, deviations from expected results have been observed likely due to school achievement and psychosocial resources, termed as "reserve capacity." Since adolescence is a critical period in developing sound psychological and behavioural patterns and adolescent markers of SES were seldom used, we determine if family SES in adolescence predicts later mortality. We also study how reserve capacity (perceived health, health-promoting behaviour and social support) and school achievement modify this relationship and reduce the negative effects of low SES.
A longitudinal study was designed by linking baseline data on 12 to 18 year-old Finns in 1985-95 (N =?41,833) from the Adolescent Health and Lifestyle Surveys with register data on mortality and SES from Statistics Finland. Average follow-up time was 18.4 years with a total of 770,161 person-years. Cox regression models, stratified by sex, were fitted to determine the effects of variables measured during adolescence: family SES, reserve capacity and school achievement on mortality risk.
All reserve capacity dimensions significantly predicted mortality in boys. Perceived health and social support predicted that in girls. Adolescents with the lowest school achievement were more than twice at risk of dying compared to those with better school performance. Low SES increased the risk of death in boys (Hazard ratios: 1.6, 95% CI 1.1-2.4) but not in girls. Reserve capacity and school achievement weakened the effects of low SES on boys' risk of death.
High reserve capacity and good school achievement in adolescence significantly reduce the risk of mortality. In boys, these also mitigate the negative effect of low SES on mortality. These findings underscore the roles of reserve capacity and school achievement during adolescence as likely causal or modifying factors in SES-health inequalities.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29282033 View in PubMed
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Adolescent self-rated health predicts general practice attendance in adulthood: Results from the Young-HUNT1 survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298275
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2019 Feb; 47(1):37-44
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2019
Author
Øystein Hetlevik
Tina L Vie
Eivind Meland
Hans J Breidablik
David Jahanlu
Author Affiliation
1 Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2019 Feb; 47(1):37-44
Date
Feb-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Female
General Practice - statistics & numerical data
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Male
Norway
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Self-rated health (SRH) is a predictor of future health. However, the association between SRH in adolescence and health problems and health care utilization in adulthood has rarely been investigated. The aim of this study was to examine adolescent SRH as a predictor of general practitioner consultations in adulthood.
SRH was registered in the Young-HUNT1 survey in 1995-1997 ( N=8828, mean age 16 years, 88% participation rate). General practitioner consultations during 2006-2014 were obtained from a national claims database. The predictive value of adolescent SRH on general practitioner consultations in adulthood was analysed by regression models estimating the relative risks (RR) for the total number of consultations and consultations for psychological, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal or respiratory problems. Age, sex and baseline measures of chronic disease and health care attendance were used as the adjusting variables.
SRH was reported as 'very good' by 28.4%, 'good' by 60.6% and 'not good' by 11.0% of the respondents. The increases in consultation rates were 21% (RR 1.21, 95% CI 1.15-1.27) and 52% (RR 1.52, 95% CI 1.40-1.64) when comparing respondents with 'very good' SRH to those with 'good' and 'not good' SRH, respectively. We also demonstrated a dose-response association between adolescent SRH and general practitioner consultations for psychological, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal or respiratory problems.
SRH in adolescence is a predictor for general practitioner consultations in adult life. Previous research shows that SRH is influenced by factors such as well-being, health behaviour, functional status and body satisfaction. Intervention studies are needed to evaluate whether population-based and clinical interventions can improve SRH by improving these factors among adolescents.
PubMed ID
29708028 View in PubMed
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Among nonagenarians, congruence between self-rated and proxy-rated health was low but both predicted mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125866
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2012 May;65(5):553-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Merja Vuorisalmi
Tytti Sarkeala
Antti Hervonen
Marja Jylhä
Author Affiliation
Tampere School of Health Sciences, University of Tampere, Medisiinarinkatu 3, Tampere 33014, Finland. merja.vuorisalmi@uta.fi
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2012 May;65(5):553-9
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Finland
Health status
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Proxy
Abstract
The congruence between self-rated global health (SRH) and proxy-rated global health (PRH), the factors associated with congruence between SRH and PRH, and their associations with mortality are examined using data from the Vitality 90+ study.
The data consist of 213 pairs of subjects--aged 90 years and older--and proxies. The relationship between SRH and PRH was analyzed by chi-square test and Cohen's kappa. Logistic regression analysis was used to find out the factors that are associated with the congruence between health ratings. The association between SRH and PRH with mortality was studied using Cox proportional hazard models.
The subjects rated their health more negatively than the proxies. Kappa value indicated only slight congruence between SRH and PRH, and they also predicted mortality differently. Good self-reported functional ability was associated with congruence between SRH and PRH.
The results imply that the evaluation processes of SRH and PRH differ, and the measures are not directly interchangeable. Both measures are useful health indicators in very old age but SRH cannot be replaced by PRH in analyses.
PubMed ID
22445085 View in PubMed
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Are forward bending of the trunk and low back pain associated among Danish blue-collar workers? A cross-sectional field study based on objective measures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277838
Source
Ergonomics. 2015;58(2):246-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Morten Villumsen
Afshin Samani
Marie Birk Jørgensen
Nidhi Gupta
Pascal Madeleine
Andreas Holtermann
Source
Ergonomics. 2015;58(2):246-58
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Female
Humans
Lifting - adverse effects
Logistic Models
Low Back Pain - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Movement
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Pain Measurement
Posture
Prevalence
Risk factors
Torso - physiopathology
Work - physiology
Abstract
The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the association between the duration of objectively measured forward bending of the trunk and low back pain (LBP) intensity among 198 Danish blue-collar workers (male = 115; female = 83). The duration of forward bending of = 30°, = 60° and = 90° was divided into high (the highest tertile) and low-moderate (the remaining tertiles) categories. High (>5) and low ( = 5) pain intensities were categorised from a self-reported 0-9 scale. Results of multi-adjusted logistic regressions indicated no significant positive associations between forward bending and LBP intensity. On the contrary, higher duration of forward bending of = 30° was associated with lower LBP intensity during all day (OR = 0.40; 95% CI, 0.15-1.02; p = 0.05) and work (OR = 0.44; 95% CI, 0.17-1.15; p = 0.09). This indication of a negative association may be explained by fear-avoidance behaviour of the blue-collar worker, job crafting or healthy worker effect.
PubMed ID
25374330 View in PubMed
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Are residents of downtown Toronto influenced by their urban neighbourhoods? Using concept mapping to examine neighbourhood characteristics and their perceived impact on self-rated mental well-being.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121951
Source
Int J Health Geogr. 2012;11:31
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Amanda J Sheppard
Christina Salmon
Priya Balasubramaniam
Janet Parsons
Gita Singh
Amina Jabbar
Qamar Zaidi
Allison Scott
Rosane Nisenbaum
Jim Dunn
Jason Ramsay
Nasim Haque
Patricia O'Campo
Author Affiliation
Centre for Research on Inner City Health, Keenan Research Centre, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St, Michael's Hospital, 30 Bond Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5B 1W8, Canada. amanda.sheppard@utoronto.ca
Source
Int J Health Geogr. 2012;11:31
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Female
Geographic Mapping
Humans
Male
Mental health
Ontario
Personal Satisfaction
Poverty Areas
Residence Characteristics
Sex Factors
Urban Population
Abstract
There is ample evidence that residential neighbourhoods can influence mental well-being (MWB), with most studies relying on census or similar data to characterize communities. Few studies have actively investigated local residents' perceptions.
Concept mapping was conducted with residents from five Toronto neighbourhoods representing low income and non-low income socio-economic groups. These residents participated in small groups and attended two sessions per neighbourhood. The first session (brainstorming) generated neighbourhood characteristics that residents felt influenced their MWB. A few weeks later, participants returned to sort these neighbourhood characteristics and rate their relative importance in affecting residents' 'good' and 'poor' MWB. The data from the sorting and rating groups were analyzed to generate conceptual maps of neighbourhood characteristics that influence MWB.
While agreement existed on factors influencing poor MWB (regardless of neighbourhood, income, gender and age), perceptions related to factors affecting good MWB were more varied. For example, women were more likely to rank physical beauty of their neighbourhood and range of services available as more important to good MWB, while men were more likely to cite free access to computers/internet and neighbourhood reputation as important. Low-income residents emphasized aesthetic attributes and public transportation as important to good MWB, while non-low-income residents rated crime, negative neighbourhood environment and social concerns as more important contributors to good MWB.
These findings contribute to the emerging literature on neighbourhoods and MWB, and inform urban planning in a Canadian context.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22862839 View in PubMed
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Are there educational differences in the association between self-rated health and mortality in Norway? The HUNT Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120073
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2012 Nov;40(7):641-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Joakim D Dalen
Tim Huijts
Steinar Krokstad
Terje A Eikemo
Author Affiliation
Norwegian University Science and Technology, NTNU Dragvoll, Institutt for sosiologi og statsvitenskap, Trondheim, Norway. joakim.dalen@samfunn.ntnu.no
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2012 Nov;40(7):641-7
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Educational Status
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Norway - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Abstract
The aim of this study was to test whether the association between self-rated health and mortality differs between educational groups in Norway, and to examine whether health problems and health-related behaviour can explain any of these differences within a previously unexplored contextual setting.
The study used data from the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study 84-86 (HUNT) with a 20-year follow up. The analyses were performed for respondents between 25-101 years at baseline (n = 56,788). The association between self-rated health and mortality was tested using Cox regression.
The results indicate that although self-rated health is associated with mortality there is no difference in the association between self-rated health and mortality between educational groups. Introducing health-related variables did not have an impact on the result.
Given the small educational differences in the association between self-rated health and mortality, this supports the reliability of self-reported health as a measurement for objective health.
PubMed ID
23042460 View in PubMed
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173 records – page 1 of 18.