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Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 2015;93(2):61-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
N F Khvorostukhina
L A Salov
D A Novichkov
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 2015;93(2):61-6
Date
2015
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diagnostic Imaging - methods
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Incidence
Pancreatitis, Acute Necrotizing - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications
Pregnancy outcome
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The study included 78 pregnant women with acute pancreatiis. Group 1 contained 43 4-37 weeks pregnant women and group 2 35 non-pregnant women. Control group was comprised of 30 women with physiological pregnancy. Comparative analysis of peculiarities of the clinical course of acute pancreatitis showed its similar manifestations in all three groups. However pregnancy itself variability of pancreatitis symptoms and their similarity to those of other acute surgical and obstetric pathologies, high (25.6) percent ofpainlessforms, late detection and inadequate treatment pose difficultiesfor diagnostics and delay the onset of pathogenetic therapy. The study of endogenous intoxication markers (leukocytic index, medium molecular weight molecules, circulating immune complexes, total endotoxins) revealed endotoxicosis in the pregnant women with acute pancreatitis that has negative effect on the fetoplacental complex and the development of pregnancy; moreover pancreatitis increases the risk of premature delivery up to 79.21%. The results of the study dictate the necessity of the searchfor new safe treatment and rehabilitation modalities for ptregnant women with acute pancreatitis.
PubMed ID
26117921 View in PubMed
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Aetiology, epidemiology and management strategies for blunt scrotal trauma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279682
Source
Surgeon. 2016 Feb;14(1):18-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
D M Dalton
N F Davis
D C O'Neill
C M Brady
E A Kiely
M F O'Brien
Source
Surgeon. 2016 Feb;14(1):18-21
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Diagnostic Imaging - methods
Disease Management
Emergency Service, Hospital
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Scrotum - injuries
Wounds, Nonpenetrating - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Young Adult
Abstract
To describe our experience of all patients presenting to a tertiary referral centre over a 3 year time period with blunt scrotal trauma and to describe a methodical approach for managing this group of patients.
A retrospective analysis was performed on all patients presenting to the Emergency Department (ED) of a level 1 trauma centre with blunt scrotal trauma from 2010 to 2013 inclusive. Inclusion criteria included a recent history of blunt scrotal trauma with associated pain and/or swelling of the affected testis on clinical examination.
Twenty-seven male patients with a median age of 19 (range 8-65) years were included and all but 1 patient underwent scrotal ultrasonography upon presentation. Sixteen patients (59%) presented with scrotal trauma secondary to a sports related injury. Fifteen patients were managed conservatively and of the 12 who underwent urgent exploration 9 had a testicular rupture, including 1 who had an emergency orchidectomy due to a completely shattered testis. Four patients had >30% of the testis replaced by necrotic tissue/haematoma; of which 2 ultimately underwent orchidectomy and insertion of testicular prosthesis.
Our findings demonstrate that the necessity for scrotal protection in sports that predispose to scrotal trauma should be reviewed. We also demonstrate the importance of scrotal ultrasonography for determining an appropriate management strategy (i.e., conservative versus surgical treatment) in this young patient cohort.
PubMed ID
25151340 View in PubMed
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Agreement between image grading of conventional (45°) and ultra wide-angle (200°) digital images in the macula in the Reykjavik eye study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143099
Source
Eye (Lond). 2010 Oct;24(10):1568-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
A. Csutak
I. Lengyel
F. Jonasson
I. Leung
A. Geirsdottir
W. Xing
T. Peto
Author Affiliation
Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, England.
Source
Eye (Lond). 2010 Oct;24(10):1568-75
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diagnostic Imaging - methods
Feasibility Studies
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted - methods
Macula Lutea - pathology
Macular Degeneration - diagnosis
Abstract
To establish the agreement between image grading of conventional (45°) and ultra wide-angle (200°) digital images in the macula.
In 2008, the 12-year follow-up was conducted on 573 participants of the Reykjavik Eye Study. This study included the use of the Optos P200C AF ultra wide-angle laser scanning ophthalmoscope alongside Zeiss FF 450 conventional digital fundus camera on 121 eyes with or without age-related macular degeneration using the International Classification System. Of these eyes, detailed grading was carried out on five cases each with hard drusen, geographic atrophy and chorioretinal neovascularisation, and six cases of soft drusen. Exact agreement and ?-statistics were calculated.
Comparison of the conventional and ultra wide-angle images in the macula showed an overall 96.43% agreement (?=0.93) with no disagreement at end-stage disease; although in one eye chorioretinal neovascularisation was graded as drusenoid pigment epithelial detachment. Of patients with drusen only, the exact agreement was 96.1%. The detailed grading showed no clinically significant disagreement between the conventional 45° and 200° images.
On the basis of our results, there is a good agreement between grading conventional and ultra wide-angle images in the macula.
PubMed ID
20523357 View in PubMed
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Alternative Imaging Modalities in Ischemic Heart Failure (AIMI-HF) IMAGE HF Project I-A: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108622
Source
Trials. 2013;14:218
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Eileen O'Meara
Lisa M Mielniczuk
George A Wells
Robert A deKemp
Ran Klein
Doug Coyle
Brian Mc Ardle
Ian Paterson
James A White
Malcolm Arnold
Matthias G Friedrich
Eric Larose
Alexander Dick
Benjamin Chow
Carole Dennie
Haissam Haddad
Terrence Ruddy
Heikki Ukkonen
Gerald Wisenberg
Bernard Cantin
Philippe Pibarot
Michael Freeman
Eric Turcotte
Kim Connelly
James Clarke
Kathryn Williams
Normand Racine
Linda Garrard
Jean-Claude Tardif
Jean DaSilva
Juhani Knuuti
Rob Beanlands
Author Affiliation
Montreal Heart Institute, Montréal, QC, Canada.
Source
Trials. 2013;14:218
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Canada
Clinical Protocols
Diagnostic Imaging - methods
Heart Arrest - etiology
Heart Failure - diagnosis - etiology - mortality - therapy
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Myocardial Infarction - etiology
Myocardial Ischemia - complications - diagnosis - mortality - therapy
Patient Readmission
Patient Selection
Positron-Emission Tomography
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Registries
Research Design
Time Factors
Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon
Abstract
Ischemic heart disease (IHD) is the most common cause of heart failure (HF); however, the role of revascularization in these patients is still unclear. Consensus on proper use of cardiac imaging to help determine which candidates should be considered for revascularization has been hindered by the absence of clinical studies that objectively and prospectively compare the prognostic information of each test obtained using both standard and advanced imaging.
This paper describes the design and methods to be used in the Alternative Imaging Modalities in Ischemic Heart Failure (AIMI-HF) multi-center trial. The primary objective is to compare the effect of HF imaging strategies on the composite clinical endpoint of cardiac death, myocardial infarction (MI), cardiac arrest and re-hospitalization for cardiac causes.In AIMI-HF, patients with HF of ischemic etiology (n = 1,261) will follow HF imaging strategy algorithms according to the question(s) asked by the physicians (for example, Is there ischemia and/or viability?), in agreement with local practices. Patients will be randomized to either standard (SPECT, Single photon emission computed tomography) imaging modalities for ischemia and/or viability or advanced imaging modalities: cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) or positron emission tomography (PET). In addition, eligible and consenting patients who could not be randomized, but were allocated to standard or advanced imaging based on clinical decisions, will be included in a registry.
AIMI-HF will be the largest randomized trial evaluating the role of standard and advanced imaging modalities in the management of ischemic cardiomyopathy and heart failure. This trial will complement the results of the Surgical Treatment for Ischemic Heart Failure (STICH) viability substudy and the PET and Recovery Following Revascularization (PARR-2) trial. The results will provide policy makers with data to support (or not) further investment in and wider dissemination of alternative 'advanced' imaging technologies.
NCT01288560.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23866673 View in PubMed
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Atherosclerosis imaging and the Canadian Atherosclerosis Imaging Network.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118012
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2013 Mar;29(3):297-303
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Jean-Claude Tardif
J David Spence
Therese M Heinonen
Alan Moody
Josephine Pressacco
Richard Frayne
Philippe L'allier
Benjamin J W Chow
Matthias Friedrich
Sandra E Black
Aaron Fenster
Brian Rutt
Rob Beanlands
Author Affiliation
Montreal Heart Institute, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada. jean-claude.tardif@icm-mhi.org
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2013 Mar;29(3):297-303
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Angiography - methods
Atherosclerosis - diagnosis - prevention & control - therapy
Canada
Carotid Arteries - pathology - radiography - radionuclide imaging - ultrasonography
Contrast Media - diagnostic use
Diagnostic Imaging - methods
Echocardiography, Three-Dimensional - methods
Evidence-Based Medicine
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging - methods
Multimodal Imaging - methods
Positron-Emission Tomography
Regression Analysis
Research Design
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Tomography, X-Ray Computed - methods
Abstract
Atherosclerosis exacts a large toll on society in the form of cardiovascular morbidity, mortality, and resource use and is exacerbated by the epidemics of obesity and diabetes. Consequently, there is a critical need for more-effective methods of diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of the complications of atherosclerosis. Careful and well-conducted large population studies are needed in order to truly understand the natural history of the disease, its imaging biomarkers, and their links to patient outcomes. The Canadian Atherosclerosis Imaging Network (CAIN) is a unique research network funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and the Canada Foundation for Innovation and designed to address these needs and to enable large population-based imaging studies. The central objective of CAIN is to move innovations in imaging toward their broad application in clinical research and clinical practice for the improved evaluation of cardiac and neurologic vascular disease. CAIN is established as an international resource for studying the natural history, progression, and regression of atherosclerosis, as well as novel therapeutic interventions aimed at atherosclerosis. The network represents Canada's leading atherosclerosis imaging experts, embodying both basic imaging science and clinical imaging research. The network is improving methods of detection and treatment of atherosclerosis and, through a better understanding of the underlying disease itself, improving strategies for disease prevention. The benefits are expected to appear in the next 2 to 3 years. CAIN will drive innovation in imaging technology within the field of cardiology and neurology and improve health outcomes in Canada and worldwide.
PubMed ID
23245557 View in PubMed
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[Diagnostic imaging in neck and low back pain].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139040
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2010 Nov 18;130(22):2256-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-18-2010
Author
Kjell Arne Kvistad
Ansgar Espeland
Author Affiliation
Klinikk for bildediagnostikk, St. Olavs hospital, Norway. kjell.arne.kvistad@stolav.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2010 Nov 18;130(22):2256-9
Date
Nov-18-2010
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bone Marrow - pathology
Diagnostic Imaging - methods
Humans
Intervertebral Disc Displacement - diagnosis - pathology
Low Back Pain - diagnosis - pathology
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Neck Pain - diagnosis
Norway
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
Diagnostic imaging in neck and low back pain can confirm serious pathology, but the clinical significance of findings is often unknown. Indications for diagnostic imaging in these patients are presented and the significance of common findings is discussed.
The review is based mainly on Norwegian guidelines (evidence-based) on low back pain, other selected publications, and a non-systematic PubMed-search for systematic reviews and randomised controlled trials of imaging in neck or low back pain.
Routine imaging in neck or back pain is not documented to improve patient outcomes and we therefore advise against it. Imaging is indicated when serious conditions are suspected and should be considered for symptoms that have not improved after 4-6 weeks. Of the imaging modalities available, MRI has the highest sensitivity for most important disorders in the neck and back. Degenerative changes in vertebrae and intervertebral discs (including disc herniations) are common also in asymptomatic individuals and usually have uncertain relation to pain. Some MRI findings in bone marrow (so called Modic-changes) are more frequent among patients with low back pain, but their relevance to treatment is not clarified.
Imaging (usually MRI) in neck or back pain is only recommended for suspected serious conditions or clear symptoms that have not improved after 4-6 weeks. Degenerative changes seldom explain symptoms or influence treatment.
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2011 Mar 4;131(5):442-321383784
PubMed ID
21109849 View in PubMed
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[Differential diagnosis of multiple sclerosis with pediatric onset: the experience of the Moscow Division for treatment of children and adolescents with multiple sclerosis].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105837
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2013;113(10 Pt 2):61-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
O V Bykova
I A Nankina
A N Platonova
N G Karpacheva
O A Petrova
T P Gorina
T T Batysheva
S V Serkov
L M Kuzenkova
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2013;113(10 Pt 2):61-8
Date
2013
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age of Onset
Child
Diagnosis, Differential
Diagnostic Imaging - methods
Disease Progression
Humans
Moscow - epidemiology
Multiple Sclerosis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Prognosis
Societies, Medical
Abstract
The diagnosis of multiple sclerosis in children and adolescence should be differentiated from a group of rare white matter diseases, with fuzzy diagnostic criteria. Some of these conditions require modern diagnostic techniques and wide knowledge of the doctor. The Moscow Division for treatment of children and adolescents with multiple sclerosis is a specialized advisory structure, which has specialists with experience in the differential diagnosis of multiple sclerosis with pediatric onset. The emphasis on the clinical aspects in differential diagnosis of early onset multiple sclerosis can reduce the time for the diagnosis and help to avoid diagnostic mistakes.
PubMed ID
24300818 View in PubMed
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Empiric versus imaging guided left ventricular lead placement in cardiac resynchronization therapy (ImagingCRT): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112937
Source
Trials. 2013;14:113
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Anders Sommer
Mads Brix Kronborg
Steen Hvitfeldt Poulsen
Morten Böttcher
Bjarne Linde Nørgaard
Kirsten Bouchelouche
Peter Thomas Mortensen
Christian Gerdes
Jens Cosedis Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Brendstrupgaardsvej 100, Skejby DK-8200, Aarhus N, Denmark. a.sommer@dadlnet.dk
Source
Trials. 2013;14:113
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy - adverse effects - methods - mortality
Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Devices
Clinical Protocols
Denmark
Diagnostic Imaging - methods
Disease Progression
Double-Blind Method
Echocardiography, Doppler
Exercise Test
Exercise Tolerance
Heart Failure - diagnosis - mortality - physiopathology - therapy
Hospitalization
Humans
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Recovery of Function
Research Design
Stroke Volume
Therapy, Computer-Assisted - instrumentation - methods
Time Factors
Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Treatment Outcome
Ventricular Dysfunction, Left - diagnosis - mortality - physiopathology - therapy
Ventricular Function, Left
Abstract
Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an established treatment in heart failure patients. However, a large proportion of patients remain nonresponsive to this pacing strategy. Left ventricular (LV) lead position is one of the main determinants of response to CRT. This study aims to clarify whether multimodality imaging guided LV lead placement improves clinical outcome after CRT.
The ImagingCRT study is a prospective, randomized, patient- and assessor-blinded, two-armed trial. The study is designed to investigate the effect of imaging guided left ventricular lead positioning on a clinical composite primary endpoint comprising all-cause mortality, hospitalization for heart failure, or unchanged or worsened functional capacity (no improvement in New York Heart Association class and
Notes
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PubMed ID
23782792 View in PubMed
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[Epidemiology, diagnosis and surgical treatment of gastrointestinal carcinoids].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177260
Source
Duodecim. 2004;120(18):2191-9; quiz 2200
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004

41 records – page 1 of 5.