Skip header and navigation

Refine By

593 records – page 1 of 60.

15q11.2 CNV affects cognitive, structural and functional correlates of dyslexia and dyscalculia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287813
Source
Transl Psychiatry. 2017 Apr 25;7(4):e1109
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-25-2017
Author
M O Ulfarsson
G B Walters
O. Gustafsson
S. Steinberg
A. Silva
O M Doyle
M. Brammer
D F Gudbjartsson
S. Arnarsdottir
G A Jonsdottir
R S Gisladottir
G. Bjornsdottir
H. Helgason
L M Ellingsen
J G Halldorsson
E. Saemundsen
B. Stefansdottir
L. Jonsson
V K Eiriksdottir
G R Eiriksdottir
G H Johannesdottir
U. Unnsteinsdottir
B. Jonsdottir
B B Magnusdottir
P. Sulem
U. Thorsteinsdottir
E. Sigurdsson
D. Brandeis
A. Meyer-Lindenberg
H. Stefansson
K. Stefansson
Source
Transl Psychiatry. 2017 Apr 25;7(4):e1109
Date
Apr-25-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Chromosome Aberrations
Chromosome Deletion
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 15 - genetics
Cognition - physiology
DNA Copy Number Variations - genetics
Developmental Disabilities - genetics
Dyscalculia - genetics
Dyslexia - genetics
Female
Functional Neuroimaging - methods - standards
Heterozygote
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Intellectual Disability - genetics
Magnetic Resonance Imaging - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests - standards
Phenotype
Temporal Lobe - anatomy & histology - diagnostic imaging
Young Adult
Abstract
Several copy number variants have been associated with neuropsychiatric disorders and these variants have been shown to also influence cognitive abilities in carriers unaffected by psychiatric disorders. Previously, we associated the 15q11.2(BP1-BP2) deletion with specific learning disabilities and a larger corpus callosum. Here we investigate, in a much larger sample, the effect of the 15q11.2(BP1-BP2) deletion on cognitive, structural and functional correlates of dyslexia and dyscalculia. We report that the deletion confers greatest risk of the combined phenotype of dyslexia and dyscalculia. We also show that the deletion associates with a smaller left fusiform gyrus. Moreover, tailored functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments using phonological lexical decision and multiplication verification tasks demonstrate altered activation in the left fusiform and the left angular gyri in carriers. Thus, by using convergent evidence from neuropsychological testing, and structural and functional neuroimaging, we show that the 15q11.2(BP1-BP2) deletion affects cognitive, structural and functional correlates of both dyslexia and dyscalculia.
Notes
Cites: Psychol Bull. 2005 Jul;131(4):592-61716060804
Cites: Neuroimage. 2009 Feb 1;44(3):1103-1219027075
Cites: Trends Neurosci. 2001 Sep;24(9):508-1111506881
Cites: J Learn Disabil. 2013 Nov-Dec;46(6):549-6923572008
Cites: Neuroimage. 2011 Aug 1;57(3):742-920884362
Cites: Cogn Neuropsychol. 2003 May 1;20(3):487-50620957581
Cites: Genet Med. 2013 Jun;15(6):478-8123258348
Cites: Neuroimage. 2009 Oct 1;47(4):1940-919446640
Cites: Brain. 2000 Feb;123 ( Pt 2):291-30710648437
Cites: PLoS One. 2012;7(8):e4312222916214
Cites: Nature. 2015 Apr 9;520(7546):224-925607358
Cites: Proc Biol Sci. 2015 May 7;282(1806):2014313925854887
Cites: Neurology. 2001 Mar 27;56(6):781-311274316
Cites: Mol Psychiatry. 2015 Feb;20(1):140-725421402
Cites: J Neurosci. 2014 Aug 20;34(34):11199-21125143601
Cites: Neuroimage. 1995 Dec;2(4):244-529343609
Cites: Front Hum Neurosci. 2009 Nov 24;3:5120046827
Cites: J Clin Psychiatry. 1998;59 Suppl 20:22-33;quiz 34-579881538
Cites: Science. 2011 May 27;332(6033):1049-5321617068
Cites: Hum Brain Mapp. 2009 Sep;30(9):2936-5219172644
Cites: Nat Genet. 2012 Apr 15;44(5):552-6122504417
Cites: Neuroimage. 2007 Oct 15;38(1):95-11317761438
Cites: Neuroscientist. 2013 Feb;19(1):43-6122547530
Cites: PLoS One. 2012;7(8):e4242222900020
Cites: Genes Brain Behav. 2015 Apr;14(4):369-7625778778
Cites: Nat Neurosci. 2016 Mar;19(3):420-3126854805
Cites: Hum Brain Mapp. 2009 Oct;30(10):3299-30819288465
Cites: Transl Psychiatry. 2014 Mar 25;4:e37424667445
Cites: Stat Methods Med Res. 2003 Oct;12(5):419-4614599004
Cites: J Learn Disabil. 2014 Nov-Dec;47(6):532-4223456983
Cites: Vision Res. 2001;41(10-11):1409-2211322983
Cites: J Neurosci. 1997 Jun 1;17(11):4302-119151747
Cites: Hum Brain Mapp. 2013 Nov;34(11):3055-6522711189
Cites: Neuroimage. 2002 Jan;15(1):273-8911771995
Cites: Brain Res Bull. 2005 Nov 15;67(5):403-1216216687
Cites: Cell Stem Cell. 2014 Jul 3;15(1):79-9124996170
Cites: Neuropsychologia. 2016 Mar;83:48-6226119921
Cites: Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2008 Dec;1145:237-5919076401
Cites: Hum Brain Mapp. 2008 May;29(5):613-2517636558
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2010 Apr 27;107(17):7939-4420395549
Cites: Cortex. 2010 Nov-Dec;46(10):1284-9820650450
Cites: J Exp Child Psychol. 2009 Jul;103(3):309-2419398112
Cites: Neuroimage. 2000 Jun;11(6 Pt 1):805-2110860804
Cites: Nature. 2014 Jan 16;505(7483):361-624352232
Cites: Nat Rev Neurosci. 2015 Apr;16(4):234-4425783611
PubMed ID
28440815 View in PubMed
Less detail

18F FDG-PET/CT evaluation of histological response after neoadjuvant treatment in patients with cancer of the esophagus or gastroesophageal junction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299743
Source
Acta Radiol. 2019 May; 60(5):578-585
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
May-2019
Author
Stefan Gabrielson
Alejandro Sanchez-Crespo
Fredrik Klevebro
Rimma Axelsson
Jon Albert Tsai
Ove Johansson
Magnus Nilsson
Author Affiliation
1 Department of Nuclear Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Acta Radiol. 2019 May; 60(5):578-585
Date
May-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Esophageal Neoplasms - therapy
Esophagogastric Junction - diagnostic imaging
Esophagus - diagnostic imaging
Female
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoadjuvant Therapy - methods
Norway
Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography - methods
Radiopharmaceuticals
Sweden
Abstract
In most parts of the world, curatively intended treatment for esophageal cancer includes neoadjuvant therapy, either with chemoradiotherapy or chemotherapy alone, followed by esophagectomy. Currently 18F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is used for preoperative disease staging, but is not well established in the evaluation of neoadjuvant treatment.
To evaluate changes in PET parameters in relation to the histological primary tumor response in the surgical specimen in patients randomized to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy or chemotherapy.
Patients were randomized between either neoadjuvant chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy followed by esophagectomy.18F-FDG PET/CT exams were conducted at baseline and following neoadjuvant treatment. Standardized uptake ratio (SUR) values were measured in the primary tumor and compared as regards histological responders and non-responders as well as different treatment arms.
Seventy-nine patients were enrolled and 51 were available for analysis. A significant rate of SUR reduction was observed ( P?=?0.02) in the primary tumor in histological responders compared to non-responders. Changes in SUR were significantly greater in responders following chemoradiotherapy ( P?=?0.02), but not following chemotherapy alone ( P?=?0.49). There was no statistically significant difference in SUR in patients with a complete histological response compared to those with a subtotal response.
Our results are similar to those of previous studies and show that changes in the rate of SUR can be used reliably to differentiate histological responders from non-responders after neoadjuvant treatment with either chemoradiotherapy or chemotherapy. Limitations of current PET technology are likely to restrict the possibility of accurately ruling out limited residual disease.
PubMed ID
30111193 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 30-year history of MPAN case from Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290990
Source
Clin Neurol Neurosurg. 2017 Aug; 159:111-113
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2017
Author
M Selikhova
E Fedotova
S Wiethoff
L V Schottlaender
S Klyushnikov
S N Illarioshkin
H Houlden
Author Affiliation
Reta Lila Weston Institute of Neurological Studies, UCL,1 Wakefield Street, London WC1N 1PJ, United Kingdom. Electronic address: m.selikhova@talk21.com.
Source
Clin Neurol Neurosurg. 2017 Aug; 159:111-113
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Intellectual Disability - diagnostic imaging - genetics
Mitochondrial Membrane Transport Proteins - genetics
Mitochondrial Proteins - genetics
Muscle Spasticity - diagnostic imaging - genetics
Optic Atrophy - diagnostic imaging - genetics
Russia
Spinocerebellar Ataxias - diagnostic imaging - genetics
Time Factors
Abstract
We present a patient with progressive spastic ataxia, with dystonia and anarthria undiagnosed until detailed genetic analysis revealed an MPAN mutation. Highlighting the worldwide MPAN distribution, a 30year history of absent diagnosis and the impact and cost saving of an early but detailed genetic analysis in complex progressive movement disorders, particularly the anarthric NBIA group.
PubMed ID
28641177 View in PubMed
Less detail

34th Bethesda Conference: Task force #2--What is the pathologic basis for new atherosclerosis imaging techniques?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5143
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2003 Jun 4;41(11):1874-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-4-2003
Author
Allen P Burke
Renu Virmani
Zorina Galis
Christian C Haudenschild
James E Muller
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiovascular Pathology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Building 54, Room 2005, 14th Street and Alaska Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20306-0001, USA.
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2003 Jun 4;41(11):1874-86
Date
Jun-4-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Coronary Arteriosclerosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology
Diagnostic Imaging - trends
Humans
Necrosis
Prevalence
Risk factors
Syndrome
Notes
Erratum In: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2003 Sep 17;42(6):1147
PubMed ID
12798554 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abdominal Adiposity Distribution Quantified by Ultrasound Imaging and Incident Hypertension in a General Population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284958
Source
Hypertension. 2016 Nov;68(5):1115-1122
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2016
Author
Ekim Seven
Betina H Thuesen
Allan Linneberg
Jørgen L Jeppesen
Source
Hypertension. 2016 Nov;68(5):1115-1122
Date
Nov-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Pressure Determination
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Female
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Incidence
Intra-Abdominal Fat - diagnostic imaging - physiopathology
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Obesity, Abdominal - complications - diagnostic imaging
Odds Ratio
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Subcutaneous Fat - diagnostic imaging - physiopathology
Ultrasonography, Doppler - methods
Abstract
Abdominal obesity is a major risk factor for hypertension. However, different distributions of abdominal adipose tissue may affect hypertension risk differently. The main purpose of this study was to explore the association of subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) with incident hypertension in a population-based setting. We hypothesized that VAT, rather than SAT, would be associated with incident hypertension. VAT and SAT were determined by ultrasound imagining in 3363 randomly selected Danes (mean age 49 years, 56% women, mean body mass index 25.8 kg/m(2)). We constructed multiple logistic regression models to compute standardized odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals per SD increase in SAT and VAT. Of the 2119 normotensive participants at baseline, 1432, with mean SAT of 2.8 cm and mean VAT of 5.7 cm, returned 5 years later for a follow-up examination and among them 203 had developed hypertension. In models including both VAT and SAT, the Framingham Hypertension Risk Score variables (age, sex, smoking status, family history of hypertension, and baseline blood pressure) and glycated hemoglobin, odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for incident hypertension for 1 SD increase in VAT and SAT was 1.27 (1.08-1.50, P=0.004) and 0.97 (0.81-1.15, P=0.70), respectively. Adjusting for body mass index instead of SAT attenuated the association between VAT and incident hypertension, but it was still significant (odds ratio, 1.22 [1.01-1.48, P=0.041] for each SD increase in VAT). In conclusion, ultrasound-determined VAT, but not SAT, was associated with incident hypertension in a random sample of Danish adults.
PubMed ID
27620395 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abdominal Aortic Calcifications Predict Survival in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298110
Source
Perit Dial Int. 2018 Sep-Oct; 38(5):366-373
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Author
Satu Mäkelä
Markku Asola
Henrik Hadimeri
James Heaf
Maija Heiro
Leena Kauppila
Susanne Ljungman
Mai Ots-Rosenberg
Johan V Povlsen
Björn Rogland
Petra Roessel
Jana Uhlinova
Maarit Vainiotalo
Maria K Svensson
Heini Huhtala
Heikki Saha
Author Affiliation
Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland satu.m.makela@pshp.fi.
Source
Perit Dial Int. 2018 Sep-Oct; 38(5):366-373
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Ankle Brachial Index
Aorta, Abdominal - diagnostic imaging
Aortic Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Cause of Death - trends
Critical Illness - mortality - therapy
Denmark - epidemiology
Estonia - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Peritoneal Dialysis - adverse effects - mortality
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Renal Dialysis
Risk factors
Survival Rate - trends
Sweden - epidemiology
Ultrasonography, Doppler
Vascular Calcification - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Peripheral arterial disease and vascular calcifications contribute significantly to the outcome of dialysis patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic role of severity of abdominal aortic calcifications and peripheral arterial disease on outcome of peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients using methods easily available in everyday clinical practice.
We enrolled 249 PD patients (mean age 61 years, 67% male) in this prospective, observational, multicenter study from 2009 to 2013. The abdominal aortic calcification score (AACS) was assessed using lateral lumbar X ray, and the ankle-brachial index (ABI) using a Doppler device.
The median AACS was 11 (range 0 - 24). In 58% of the patients, all 4 segments of the abdominal aorta showed deposits, while 19% of patients had no visible deposits (AACS 0). Ankle-brachial index was normal in 49%, low ( 1.3) in 34% of patients. Altogether 91 patients (37%) died during the median follow-up of 46 months. Only 2 patients (5%) with AACS 0 died compared with 50% of the patients with AACS = 7 (p
PubMed ID
29386304 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abnormal echocardiography in patients with type 2 diabetes and relation to symptoms and clinical characteristics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286353
Source
Diab Vasc Dis Res. 2016 Sep;13(5):321-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Peter Godsk Jørgensen
Magnus T Jensen
Rasmus Mogelvang
Bernt Johan von Scholten
Jan Bech
Thomas Fritz-Hansen
Søren Galatius
Tor Biering-Sørensen
Henrik U Andersen
Tina Vilsbøll
Peter Rossing
Jan S Jensen
Source
Diab Vasc Dis Res. 2016 Sep;13(5):321-30
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diagnosis - epidemiology
Diastole
Echocardiography, Doppler
Electrocardiography
Female
Humans
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Outpatients
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Risk factors
Ventricular Dysfunction, Left - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology - physiopathology
Ventricular Function, Left
Abstract
We aimed to determine the prevalence of echocardiographic abnormalities and their relation to clinical characteristics and cardiac symptoms in a large, contemporary cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes.
A total of 1030 patients with type 2 diabetes participated. Echocardiographic abnormalities were present in 513 (49.8%) patients, mainly driven by a high prevalence of diastolic dysfunction 178 (19.4%), left ventricular hypertrophy 213 (21.0%) and left atrial enlargement, 200 (19.6%). The prevalence increased markedly with age from 31.1% in the youngest group (75?years) (p?
PubMed ID
27208801 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abnormally invasive placenta-prevalence, risk factors and antenatal suspicion: results from a large population-based pregnancy cohort study in the Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294473
Source
BJOG. 2016 Jul; 123(8):1348-55
Publication Type
Journal Article
Video-Audio Media
Date
Jul-2016
Author
L Thurn
P G Lindqvist
M Jakobsson
L B Colmorn
K Klungsoyr
R I Bjarnadóttir
A M Tapper
P E Børdahl
K Gottvall
K B Petersen
L Krebs
M Gissler
J Langhoff-Roos
K Källen
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Blekinge Hospital, Karlskrona, Sweden.
Source
BJOG. 2016 Jul; 123(8):1348-55
Date
Jul-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Video-Audio Media
Keywords
Adult
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hysterectomy - statistics & numerical data
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Norway - epidemiology
Peripartum Period
Placenta Accreta - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology
Postpartum Hemorrhage - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Ultrasonography
Ultrasonography, Prenatal
Uterine Rupture - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The objective was to investigate prevalence, estimate risk factors, and antenatal suspicion of abnormally invasive placenta (AIP) associated with laparotomy in women in the Nordic countries.
Population-based cohort study.
A 3-year Nordic collaboration among obstetricians to identify and report on uterine rupture, peripartum hysterectomy, excessive blood loss, and AIP from 2009 to 2012 The Nordic Obstetric Surveillance Study (NOSS).
In the NOSS study, clinicians reported AIP cases from maternity wards and the data were validated against National health registries.
Prevalence, risk factors, antenatal suspicion, birth complications, and risk estimations using aggregated national data.
A total of 205 cases of AIP in association with laparotomy were identified, representing 3.4 per 10 000 deliveries. The single most important risk factor, which was reported in 49% of all cases of AIP, was placenta praevia. The risk of AIP increased seven-fold after one prior caesarean section (CS) to 56-fold after three or more CS. Prior postpartum haemorrhage was associated with six-fold increased risk of AIP (95% confidence interval 3.7-10.9). Approximately 70% of all cases were not diagnosed antepartum. Of these, 39% had prior CS and 33% had placenta praevia.
Our findings indicate that a lower CS rate in the population may be the most effective way to lower the incidence of AIP. Focused ultrasound assessment of women at high risk will likely strengthen antenatal suspicion. Prior PPH is a novel risk factor associated with an increased prevalence of AIP.
An ultrasound assessment in women with placenta praevia or prior CS may double the awareness for AIP.
Notes
CommentIn: BJOG. 2016 May;123(6):1032 PMID 27101265
CommentIn: BJOG. 2016 May;123(6):1031-2 PMID 27101264
CommentIn: BJOG. 2017 Jan;124(1):164-165 PMID 28009121
PubMed ID
26227006 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accuracy of an online tool to assess appropriateness for an epilepsy surgery evaluation-A population-based Swedish study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299157
Source
Epilepsy Res. 2018 09; 145:140-144
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
09-2018
Author
Sara Lukmanji
K Chelsea Altura
Bertil Rydenhag
Kristina Malmgren
Samuel Wiebe
Nathalie Jetté
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary, 1403 29 Street NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N2T9, Canada; Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, 1403 29 Street NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N2T9, Canada.
Source
Epilepsy Res. 2018 09; 145:140-144
Date
09-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Community Health Planning
Electroencephalography
Epilepsy - diagnostic imaging - physiopathology - surgery
Female
General Surgery - methods
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Online Systems
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - methods
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The Canadian Appropriateness of Epilepsy Surgery (CASES) tool was developed to help physicians identify patients who should be referred for an epilepsy surgery evaluation. The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of this tool using a population-based cohort registry (the Swedish National Epilepsy Surgery Register) of patients who underwent epilepsy surgery between 1990 and 2012.
Overall, 1044 patients met eligibility criteria for the study and were deemed to be surgical candidates by epilepsy experts. Demographic and epilepsy related characteristics were examined and summarized using descriptive statistics. A CASES appropriateness score was calculated for each of these patients. Chi squared analyses or fisher's exact tests were used to determine if there were any relationships between demographic and epilepsy related characteristics not captured in the tool and appropriateness scores.
The mean appropriateness score was 8.6 and 985 (Sensitivity: 94.35%; 95% CI, 92.77%-95.60%) patients were appropriate, 46 (4.41%; 95% CI, 3.31%-5.84%) were uncertain, and 13 (1.25%; 95% CI, 0.72%-2.13%) were inappropriate for an epilepsy surgery evaluation. The mean necessity score, which was only calculated for the 985 appropriate patients, was 8.7. All 13 inappropriate patients had tried less than two anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs). In addition, age at onset of epilepsy and age at epilepsy surgery were both significantly associated with appropriateness score.
These results demonstrate that the CASES tool is highly sensitive as it designated 94.3% of epilepsy surgery patients as appropriate for an epilepsy surgery evaluation. All of those classified as inappropriate were not drug resistant, as they had not yet tried two AEDs.
PubMed ID
30007238 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Accuracy of the Computed Tomography Diagnosis of Acute Appendicitis: Does the Experience of the Radiologist Matter?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294920
Source
Scand J Surg. 2018 Mar; 107(1):43-47
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
Mar-2018
Author
E Lietzén
P Salminen
I Rinta-Kiikka
H Paajanen
T Rautio
P Nordström
M Aarnio
T Rantanen
J Sand
J-P Mecklin
A Jartti
J Virtanen
P Ohtonen
N Ånäs
J M Grönroos
Author Affiliation
1 Division of Digestive Surgery and Urology, Department of Acute and Digestive Surgery, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
Source
Scand J Surg. 2018 Mar; 107(1):43-47
Date
Mar-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Appendectomy - methods
Appendicitis - diagnostic imaging - drug therapy - surgery
Clinical Competence
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Radiologists
Risk assessment
Tomography, X-Ray Computed - methods
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
To assess the accuracy of computed tomography in diagnosing acute appendicitis with a special reference to radiologist experience.
Data were collected prospectively in our randomized controlled trial comparing surgery and antibiotic treatment for uncomplicated acute appendicitis (APPAC trial, NCT01022567). We evaluated 1065 patients who underwent computed tomography for suspected appendicitis. The on-call radiologist preoperatively analyzed these computed tomography images. In this study, the radiologists were divided into experienced (consultants) and inexperienced (residents) ones, and the comparison of interpretations was made between these two radiologist groups.
Out of the 1065 patients, 714 had acute appendicitis and 351 had other or no diagnosis on computed tomography. There were 700 true-positive, 327 true-negative, 14 false-positive, and 24 false-negative cases. The sensitivity and the specificity of computed tomography were 96.7% (95% confidence interval, 95.1-97.8) and 95.9% (95% confidence interval, 93.2-97.5), respectively. The rate of false computed tomography diagnosis was 4.2% for experienced consultant radiologists and 2.2% for inexperienced resident radiologists (p?=?0.071). Thus, the experience of the radiologist had no effect on the accuracy of computed tomography diagnosis.
The accuracy of computed tomography in diagnosing acute appendicitis was high. The experience of the radiologist did not improve the diagnostic accuracy. The results emphasize the role of computed tomography as an accurate modality in daily routine diagnostics for acute appendicitis in all clinical emergency settings.
PubMed ID
28929862 View in PubMed
Less detail

593 records – page 1 of 60.