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2,3-Butanediol in plasma from an alcoholic mistakenly identified as ethylene glycol by gas-chromatographic analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12006
Source
Clin Chem. 1991 Aug;37(8):1453-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1991
Author
A W Jones
L. Nilsson
S A Gladh
K. Karlsson
J. Beck-Friis
Author Affiliation
Department of Alcohol Toxicology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Clin Chem. 1991 Aug;37(8):1453-5
Date
Aug-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - blood
Butylene Glycols - blood - pharmacokinetics
Chromatography, Gas
Diagnostic Errors
Ethylene Glycol
Ethylene Glycols - blood - poisoning
Flame Ionization
Humans
Male
Abstract
2,3-Butanediol was mistakenly identified as ethylene glycol in plasma specimens from two alcoholic patients. The cyclic phenylboronate ester derivatives of 2,3-butanediol and ethylene glycol had the same retention time when OV-17 was used as the stationary phase for gas chromatography. This led to incorrect diagnosis of ethylene glycol poisoning and unnecessary invasive therapy. Plasma from two chronic alcoholics contained 2,3-butanediol at 3.5 and 3.4 mmol/L. The elimination half-life of 2,3-butanediol was 3.9 days when ethanol was administered during therapy for suspected ethylene glycol poisoning. Low concentrations of 2,3-butanediol might be present in blood of chronic alcoholics as a result of a novel pathway of intermediary metabolism associated with some forms of alcoholism. However, a more likely explanation for fairly high concentrations of 2,3-butanediol is enzymatic production from 2-butanone. This ketone occurs in denatured alcohol preparations often consumed by alcoholics in Sweden.
PubMed ID
1868611 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Vardfacket. 1997 Feb 10;21(2):53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-10-1997
Author
E. Forslind
Source
Vardfacket. 1997 Feb 10;21(2):53
Date
Feb-10-1997
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diagnostic Errors
Humans
Infant
Jurisprudence
Male
Meningococcal Infections - diagnosis
Sweden
PubMed ID
9447187 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A case of Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60829
Source
Lakartidningen. 1976 Dec 15;73(51):4541-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-1976
Source
Lakartidningen. 1976 Dec 15;73(51):4541-2
Date
Dec-15-1976
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diagnostic Errors
Humans
Infant
Jurisprudence
Male
Sweden
Virus Diseases - diagnosis
Waterhouse-Friderichsen Syndrome - diagnosis
PubMed ID
1004077 View in PubMed
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Acceptability of a faecal occult blood screening protocol for carcinoma of the colon in family practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236220
Source
Fam Pract. 1986 Dec;3(4):246-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1986
Author
J F Sangster
T M Gerace
M J Bass
Source
Fam Pract. 1986 Dec;3(4):246-50
Date
Dec-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Colonic Neoplasms - diagnosis - prevention & control
Diagnostic Errors
Family Practice
Female
Humans
Male
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Occult Blood
Ontario
Abstract
Cancer of the colon is the second most common malignancy in North America and screening methods are needed for diagnosing the lesions at an early stage. Faecal occult blood screening is a method of secondary prevention which is particularly adaptable to the family practice setting. In order to test the feasibility of using this test in family practice, 16 family physicians participated in a trial screening programme using the Hemoccult II test. During the two-month trial 776 patients over 40 years of age were screened; 19 of the tests were positive but in two cases patients were thought to have failed to follow dietary and medical restrictions. Of the 17 patients with verified positive tests, further investigation showed five patients had neoplastic disease and three of these had malignant disease. The detection rate for cancer of the colon using the Hemoccult II test was therefore 3/776, equivalent to 3.9 per 1000 cases screened. By narrowing the age range for screening patients to between 45 and 75 years, the time involved to screen the population at risk could be decreased.
PubMed ID
3803770 View in PubMed
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Accuracy and reliability of 'specialized' physical therapists in auscultating tape-recorded lung sounds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219667
Source
Physiother Can. 1993;45(1):21-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
D. Brooks
L. Wilson
C. Kelsey
Author Affiliation
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Toronto.
Source
Physiother Can. 1993;45(1):21-4
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Auscultation - standards - statistics & numerical data
Clinical Competence - standards - statistics & numerical data
Diagnostic Errors
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Humans
Ontario
Physical Therapy Modalities - classification - standards - statistics & numerical data
Reproducibility of Results
Research Design
Respiratory Function Tests - standards - statistics & numerical data
Tape Recording
Abstract
This study investigated the accuracy and inter-rater reliability of 'specialized' physical therapists in the auscultation of tape-recorded lung sounds. In addition, a correlation was investigated between accuracy of interpretation and the number of years of specialization in the field of cardiorespiratory physical therapy. This research follows an earlier study which investigated the accuracy and inter-rater reliability of auscultating tape-recorded lung sounds in a 'non-specialized' cohort of physical therapists. The subjects were 26 'specialized' cardiorespiratory physical therapists working in acute urban teaching hospitals. These individuals were required to have been practising currently and exclusively for at least one year in the area of cardiorespiratory physical therapy. Participants listened with a stethoscope to five different sounds and identified them from a standardized list of terms. One of three tapes with the same lung sounds in different order was randomly selected for each physical therapist. The percentage of correct answers for all subjects was calculated. An accurate response in the detection of lung sounds was arbitrarily defined as a percentage of correct answers of 70% or greater. The difference between the pooled correct response rate of 50% and the arbitrarily set value of 70% was statistically significant (z = 2.23, p
PubMed ID
10124337 View in PubMed
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Accuracy and sensitivity of Parkinsonian disorder diagnoses in two Swedish national health registers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125521
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2012;38(3):186-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Adina L Feldman
Anna L V Johansson
Margaret Gatz
Måns Flensburg
Giselle M Petzinger
Håkan Widner
Mark F Lew
Nancy L Pedersen
Karin Wirdefeldt
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2012;38(3):186-93
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cause of Death
Diagnostic Errors - statistics & numerical data
Diseases in Twins - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Parkinsonian Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Predictive value of tests
Registries
Sensitivity and specificity
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Swedish population-based national health registers are widely used data sources in epidemiological research. Register-based diagnoses of Parkinson's disease have not been validated against clinical information.
Parkinson's disease (PD) and other parkinsonian disorder diagnoses were ascertained in two registers, i.e. the National Patient Register (NPR) and the Cause of Death Register (CDR). Diagnoses were validated in terms of accuracy (positive predictive value) and sensitivity against data from a population-based study of PD in 1998-2004 that screened more than 35,000 persons and identified 194 cases of parkinsonian disorders including 132 PD cases (the gold standard for the purposes of this study).
Accuracy for any parkinsonian disorder diagnoses was 88.0% in the NPR and 94.4% in the CDR. Accuracy of PD diagnoses was 70.8% in the NPR and 66.7% in the CDR. Misclassification between differential parkinsonian diagnoses was common. The accuracy of PD diagnoses in the NPR improved to 83.0% by restricting the definition to primary diagnoses only. The sensitivity of PD diagnoses in the NPR and CDR combined was 83.1%, with a mean time to detection of 6.9 years.
Population-based national health registers are valid data sources in epidemiological studies of PD or parkinsonian disorder etiology but are less suitable in studies of incidence or prevalence.
Notes
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Cites: Arch Neurol. 1999 Jan;56(1):98-1029923767
PubMed ID
22472568 View in PubMed
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Accuracy in celiac disease diagnostics by controlling the small-bowel biopsy process.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135188
Source
J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2011 May;52(5):549-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Charlotta Webb
Britta Halvarsson
Fredrik Norström
Anna Myléus
Annelie Carlsson
Lars Danielsson
Lotta Högberg
Anneli Ivarsson
Eva Karlsson
Lars Stenhammar
Olof Sandström
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
Source
J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2011 May;52(5):549-53
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Markers - blood
Biopsy - methods
Celiac Disease - epidemiology - pathology - surgery
Child
Diagnostic Errors - prevention & control
Endoscopy - methods
Humans
Intestinal Mucosa - pathology - surgery
Intestine, Small - pathology - surgery
Mass Screening - methods
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Suction
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In a Swedish celiac disease screening study (Exploring the Iceberg of Celiacs in Sweden), we systematically reviewed the clinical diagnostic procedures with the aim to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and to take advantage of lessons learned for improving diagnostic routines.
A school-based celiac disease screening study involving 5 Swedish centers, with 10,041 invited 12-year-olds with 7567 consenting participation. All 192 children with elevated serological markers were recommended to undergo small-bowel biopsy, performed and evaluated according to local clinical routines. All of the mucosal specimens were reevaluated by 1 and, when needed, 2 expert pathologists to reach diagnostic consensus.
Small-bowel biopsies were performed in 184 children: 130 by endoscopy and 54 by suction capsule. Endoscopic biopsies were inconclusive in 0.6%, compared with 7.4% of biopsies by suction capsule. A patchy enteropathy was found in 9.1%. Reevaluation by the expert pathologist resulted in 6 additional cases with celiac disease and 1 cleared. Sixteen children with normal or inconclusive biopsies, 4 after endoscopy, and 12 after suction capsule were endoscopically rebiopsied, resulting in another 8 cases. The celiac disease prevalence of 30 of 1000 (95% confidence interval 26-34) was not statistically different from that previously reported.
The present review revealed the importance of controlling each step of the diagnostic procedure. Several cases would have been missed by relying only on local routines. To improve the quality of childhood celiac disease diagnostics, we recommend multiple endoscopic biopsies from both proximal and distal duodenum and standardized evaluation by a pathologist with good knowledge of celiac disease.
PubMed ID
21502825 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of clinical diagnosis in a Canadian teaching hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244220
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1981 Sep 1;125(5):443-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-1981
Author
W M Thurlbeck
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1981 Sep 1;125(5):443-7
Date
Sep-1-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Autopsy
British Columbia
Chronic Disease
Diagnostic Errors
Humans
Lung - pathology
Lung Diseases - diagnosis - pathology
Pneumonia - pathology
Pulmonary Embolism - pathology
Abstract
Two hundred autopsies were investigated to determine the correlation between the clinical and pathological diagnoses in three categories--major underlying disease, cause of death and significant incidental pulmonary findings. There was concurrence in diagnosis of the major underlying disease in 76% of cases, with 12% of disagreements being considered minor and 12% major. In only three cases might different management have affected the outcome had the correct diagnosis of the major underlying disease been made during life. There was concurrence of the diagnosis of the cause of death (which was often different from the underlying disease) in 64% of cases, and in 10% of cases the outcome might have been different had the clinical diagnosis been accurate. The clinical opinion that lung disease was the cause of death was confirmed at autopsy in 54% of cases, and 45% of the pulmonary causes of death as determined at autopsy had been recognized clinically. Major incidental pulmonary findings diagnosed clinically were confirmed in 76% of cases, and major pulmonary findings diagnosed at autopsy had been recognized clinically in 83%. The major sources of these discrepancies were pulmonary embolism and pneumonia. If autopsies are to play a role in patient management, clinicians will have to be made aware of discrepancies between clinical and autopsy diagnosis. The real test of efficacy would be modification of patient management for the good.
Notes
Cites: Bull N Y Acad Med. 1968 Jul;44(7):808-295240157
Cites: Acta Med Scand. 1974 Sep;196(3):203-104422553
Cites: Br Med J. 1975 May 10;2(5966):326-81131528
Cites: JAMA. 1975 Aug 4;233(5):441-31173855
Cites: JAMA. 1976 May 10;235(19):2080-1946528
Cites: Br Med J. 1977 Jun 18;1(6076):1577-80871672
Cites: Am J Clin Pathol. 1978 Feb;69(2 Suppl):242-4626168
Cites: Br Med J. 1980 Oct 11;281(6246):985-87427553
PubMed ID
7284926 View in PubMed
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[Accuracy of diagnosis of injuries in traffic accidents at all stages of medical transport].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249591
Source
Sov Med. 1977 Sep;(9):132-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1977

652 records – page 1 of 66.