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Adjusting outcome measurements for case-mix in a vascular surgical register--is it possible and desirable?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48246
Source
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 1996 Nov;12(4):459-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1996
Author
J. Elfström
T. Troëng
A. Stubberöd
Author Affiliation
Department of Vascular Surgery, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 1996 Nov;12(4):459-63
Date
Nov-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Amputation - statistics & numerical data
Arterial Occlusive Diseases - mortality - surgery
Chi-Square Distribution
Diagnosis-Related Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Leg - blood supply
Male
Odds Ratio
Registries
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Vascular Patency
Vascular Surgical Procedures - statistics & numerical data
Veins - transplantation
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: We analysed the variation in the outcome of infrainguinal bypass surgery between departments in a register for clinical audit to see if variation in case-mix influenced the results. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study was a retrospective analysis of 764 infrainguinal bypass operations performed from 1988 to 1990 at six Swedish surgical departments. Results were assessed at 30 days and at 1 year postoperatively. RESULTS: There was a significant variation (p
Notes
Comment In: Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 1998 Jul;16(1):879715725
PubMed ID
8980438 View in PubMed
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Adolescent psychiatric in-patients. A high-risk group for premature death.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196074
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2000 Feb;176:121-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2000
Author
E. Kjelsberg
Author Affiliation
Centre for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2000 Feb;176:121-5
Date
Feb-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Diagnosis-Related Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Inpatients - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mental Disorders - mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Risk factors
Abstract
Research has demonstrated increased mortality rates in adolescent psychiatric in-patients.
To investigate this excess mortality by calculating standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) relative to cause of death, diagnosis, cohort and age.
A nationwide Norwegian sample of 1095 former adolescent psychiatric in-patients were followed up 15-33 years after first hospitalisation by record linkage to the National Death Cause Registry.
The SMR was significantly increased for almost all causes of death investigated. In males, all psychiatric diagnoses had significantly increased SMRs, whereas in females, organic mental disorder, anxiety disorder and affective disorder had non-significantly increased SMRs. The SMR was significantly elevated for all age-spans and cohorts investigated.
A broad prevention strategy is needed to combat the increased mortality rates found in adolescent psychiatric in-patients.
PubMed ID
10755047 View in PubMed
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An epidemiological study on increased length of stay.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103251
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1990 Feb;67(1):28-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1990
Author
L. McIntyre
Author Affiliation
Izaak Walton Killam Hospital, Dalhousie University, Faculty of Medicine, Halifax.
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1990 Feb;67(1):28-31
Date
Feb-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Diagnosis-Related Groups - statistics & numerical data
Epidemiologic Methods
Hospitals, Pediatric - utilization
Hospitals, Special - utilization
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Length of Stay - trends
Mortality
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Patient Admission - trends
Patient Discharge - trends
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
The epidemiologic triad of causation states that all illness results from a disequilibrium between host, agent and environmental factors. The "illness" investigated in this report--increased LOS--resulted from a combination of: patient factors--the increased prevalence of chronic diseases in childhood, a revolution in neonatal survival and an increase in survivorship in general for severe diseases, such as congenital anomalies and genetic diseases; agent factors--the transition from agents of infectious disease to agents of chronic disease as well as iatrogenesis; and health care environmental factors--equity issues involving the ethics of treatment, changes in medical technology and patterns of medical practice. The use of preadmission testing, increased participation by parents in the care of their children, an investigation of the appropriate venue for care of chronically ill children and the back transfer of recovering children to their home hospitals were recommended and considered by the hospital's administration and board of governors.
PubMed ID
2107108 View in PubMed
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Assessing methods for measurement of clinical outcomes and quality of care in primary care practices.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122368
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2012;12:214
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Michael E Green
William Hogg
Colleen Savage
Sharon Johnston
Grant Russell
R Liisa Jaakkimainen
Richard H Glazier
Janet Barnsley
Richard Birtwhistle
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. michael.green@dfm.queensu.ca
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2012;12:214
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Chronic Disease - epidemiology - therapy
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diagnosis-Related Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Medical Audit - methods
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - methods
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Patient Credit and Collection
Patients - psychology
Physicians, Family - psychology - standards
Preventive Health Services - economics - standards - statistics & numerical data
Primary Health Care - standards
Quality Indicators, Health Care
Social Class
Abstract
To evaluate the appropriateness of potential data sources for the population of performance indicators for primary care (PC) practices.
This project was a cross sectional study of 7 multidisciplinary primary care teams in Ontario, Canada. Practices were recruited and 5-7 physicians per practice agreed to participate in the study. Patients of participating physicians (20-30) were recruited sequentially as they presented to attend a visit. Data collection included patient, provider and practice surveys, chart abstraction and linkage to administrative data sets. Matched pairs analysis was used to examine the differences in the observed results for each indicator obtained using multiple data sources.
Seven teams, 41 physicians, 94 associated staff and 998 patients were recruited. The survey response rate was 81% for patients, 93% for physicians and 83% for associated staff. Chart audits were successfully completed on all but 1 patient and linkage to administrative data was successful for all subjects. There were significant differences noted between the data collection methods for many measures. No single method of data collection was best for all outcomes. For most measures of technical quality of care chart audit was the most accurate method of data collection. Patient surveys were more accurate for immunizations, chronic disease advice/information dispensed, some general health promotion items and possibly for medication use. Administrative data appears useful for indicators including chronic disease diagnosis and osteoporosis/ breast screening.
Multiple data collection methods are required for a comprehensive assessment of performance in primary care practices. The choice of which methods are best for any one particular study or quality improvement initiative requires careful consideration of the biases that each method might introduce into the results. In this study, both patients and providers were willing to participate in and consent to, the collection and linkage of information from multiple sources that would be required for such assessments.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22824551 View in PubMed
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Association between duration of neonatal hospital stay and readmission rate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214051
Source
J Pediatr. 1995 Nov;127(5):758-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1995
Author
K S Lee
M. Perlman
M. Ballantyne
I. Elliott
T. To
Author Affiliation
Division of Neonatology, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Pediatr. 1995 Nov;127(5):758-66
Date
Nov-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Catchment Area (Health)
Chi-Square Distribution
Dehydration
Diagnosis-Related Groups - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal - utilization
Jaundice, Neonatal
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data - trends
Odds Ratio
Ontario
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data - trends
Postnatal Care - trends
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Time Factors
Abstract
A recent rapid decrease in the duration of neonatal hospital stay in Ontario, Canada, enabled us to study the association between healthy infants' age at neonatal hospital discharge and subsequent readmission rates.
(1) Population-based and (2) single hospital-based retrospective studies.
(1) A total of 920,554 healthy infants with a birth weight of 2500 gm or more, born in Ontario from 1987 to 1994. (2) Infants with a birth weight of 2500 gm or more, born during the same period, and readmitted before 15 days from home to the Hospital for Sick Children for jaundice or dehydration.
Duration of neonatal stay in the hospital and readmission rates were measured, and diagnostic codes were analyzed. Severity of illness was evaluated in infants readmitted to our hospital.
In Ontario the mean length of stay decreased from 4.5 days to 2.7 days (p = 0.000), and the readmission rate during the first 2 weeks of life increased from 12.9 to 20.7 per 1000 (p = 0.000). Increased rates of readmission were most marked for jaundice and dehydration. The infants readmitted to our hospital had evidence of increased severity of illness as indicated by higher serum bilirubin and sodium concentrations. Two deaths occurred in infants with hypernatremic dehydration, one in 1992-1993 and another in 1993-1994.
In Ontario, shorter neonatal hospital stay was associated with increased readmission rates for conditions that may not give rise to symptoms or signs on days 1 to 3 of life. In our hospital the severity of jaundice and dehydration in readmitted infants increased. The severity-of-illness data raise the question of whether shorter neonatal hospital stay of apparently healthy infants is always safe. Decisions to discharge infants should be based on rigorous evaluation of individual infants.
Notes
Comment In: J Pediatr. 1995 Nov;127(5):736-77472825
PubMed ID
7472833 View in PubMed
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Association of child and adolescent psychiatric disorders with somatic or biomedical diagnoses: do population-based utilization study results support the adverse childhood experiences study?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122998
Source
Perm J. 2012;16(2):23-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
T C R Wilkes
Lindsay Guyn
Bing Li
Mingshan Lu
David Cawthorpe
Author Affiliation
Foothills Hospital, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. chris.wilkes@albertahealthservices.ca
Source
Perm J. 2012;16(2):23-6
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alberta - epidemiology
Ambulatory Care - economics
Child
Child, Preschool
Comorbidity
Diagnosis-Related Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Services - utilization
Humans
Infant
Male
Mental Disorders - economics - epidemiology
Somatoform Disorders - economics - epidemiology
Abstract
Few population-based studies have examined the relationship between psychiatric and somatic or biomedical disorders.
We examined the effect of the presence or absence of any psychiatric disorder on somatic or biomedical diagnosis disorder costs. Guided by the Kaiser Permanente and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study, we examined our administrative data to test if psychiatric disorder is associated with a higher level of somatic disorder.
A dataset containing registration data for 205,281 patients younger than age 18 years was randomly selected from administrative data based on these patients never having received any specialized, publicly funded ambulatory, emergency or inpatient admission for treatment of a psychiatric disorder. All physician billing records (8,724,714) from the 16 fiscal years April 1993 to March 2009 were collected and grouped on the basis of presence or absence of any International Classification of Diseases (ICD) psychiatric disorder.
We compared 2 groups (with or without any psychiatric disorder: dependent variable) on the cumulative 16-year mean cost for somatic (biomedical, nonpsychiatric) ICD diagnoses (independent variable).
Billing costs related to somatic and biomedical disorders (nonpsychiatric costs) were 1.8 times greater for those with psychiatric disorders than for those without psychiatric disorders. Somatic costs peaked before the age of 6 years and remained higher than the groupings without psychiatric disorders in each age range.
In support of the ACE study, ICD psychiatric disorders (as an index of developmental adversity) are associated with substantially greater ICD somatic disorders. The findings have implications for health care practice.
Notes
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Cites: BMC Public Health. 2010;10:2020085623
PubMed ID
22745612 View in PubMed
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Clinical categories of patients and encounter rates in primary health care - a three-year study in defined populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170661
Source
BMC Public Health. 2006;6:35
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Lennart Carlsson
Lars-Erik Strender
Gerd Fridh
Gunnar H Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Center for Family and Community Medicine, Neurotec Department, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. lennart.carlsson@chello.se
Source
BMC Public Health. 2006;6:35
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease - epidemiology
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Community Health Centers - organization & administration - utilization
Comorbidity
Diagnosis-Related Groups - statistics & numerical data
Family Practice - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Primary Health Care - organization & administration - utilization
Retrospective Studies
Software
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The objective was to estimate the proportion of inhabitants with a diagnosis-registered encounter with a general practitioner, and to elucidate annual variations of clinical categories of patients in terms of their individual comorbidity.
A three-year retrospective study of encounter data from electronic patient records, with an annual-based application of the Johns Hopkins Adjusted Clinical Groups (ACG) system. Data were retrieved from every patient with a diagnosis-registered encounter with a GP during the period 2001-2003 at 13 publicly managed primary health care centres in Blekinge county, southeastern Sweden, with about 150000 inhabitants.
Proportions of inhabitants with a diagnosis-registered encounter, and ranges of the annual proportions of categories of patients according to ACGs.
The proportion of inhabitants with a diagnosis-registered encounter ranged from about 64.0% to 90.6% for the primary health care centres, and averaged about 76.5% for all inhabitants. In a three-year perspective the average range of categories of patients was about 0.4% on the county level, and about 0.9% on the primary health care centre level. About one third of the patients each year had a constellation of two or more types of morbidity.
About three fourths of all inhabitants had one or more diagnosis-registered encounters with a general practitioner during the three-year period. The annual variation of categories of patients according to ACGs was small on both the county and the primary health care centre level. The ACG system seems useful for demonstrating and predicting various aspects of clinical categories of patients in Swedish primary health care.
Notes
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PubMed ID
16483353 View in PubMed
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Data-based nurse staffing indicators with Bayesian networks explain nurse job satisfaction: a pilot study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138172
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2011 May;67(5):1053-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Taina Pitkäaho
Olli-Pekka Ryynänen
Pirjo Partanen
Katri Vehviläinen-Julkunen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, Kuopio Campus, University of Eastern Finland. taina.pitkaaho@kuh.fi
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2011 May;67(5):1053-66
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bayes Theorem
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Diagnosis-Related Groups - statistics & numerical data
Finland
Hospital Information Systems
Hospitals, University
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Nursing Administration Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - organization & administration - supply & distribution
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Pilot Projects
Workplace
Abstract
This paper is a report of a pilot study to examine the relationship of nursing intensity, work environment intensity and nursing resources to nurse job satisfaction.
There is an ever increasing amount of information in hospital information systems; however, still very little of it is actually used in nursing management and leadership.
The combination of a retrospective time series and cross-sectional survey data was used. The time series patient data of 9704 in/outpatients and nurse data of 110 nurses were collected from six inpatient units in a medical clinic of a university hospital in Finland in 2006. A unit-level measure of nurse job satisfaction was collected with a survey (n = 98 nurses) in the autumn of 2006. Bayesian networks were applied to examine a model that explains nurse job satisfaction.
In a hospital data system, 18 usable nurse staffing indicators were identified. There were four nurse staffing indicators: patient acuity from nursing intensity subgroup, diagnosis-related group volume from work environment subgroup, and skill mix and nurse turnover from nursing resources subgroup that explained the likelihood of nurse job satisfaction in the final model. The Bayesian networks also revealed the elusive non-linear relationship between nurse job satisfaction and patient acuity.
Survey-based information on nurse job satisfaction can be modelled with data-based nurse staffing indicators. Nurse researchers could use the Bayesian approach to obtain information about the effects of nurse staffing on nursing outcomes.
PubMed ID
21198804 View in PubMed
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Day medicine: an urgent internal medicine clinic and medical procedures suite.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184150
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 2003;16(1):17-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
H Jay Biem
David Cotton
Shirley McNeil
Alice Boechler
Debra Gudmundson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon.
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 2003;16(1):17-23
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Day Care - organization & administration - utilization
Diagnosis-Related Groups - statistics & numerical data
Diagnostic Services - utilization
Emergency Medical Services - organization & administration - utilization
Hospital Planning
Hospitals, University
Humans
Internal Medicine - organization & administration
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital - organization & administration - utilization
Saskatchewan
Utilization Review
Abstract
During Saskatchewan's healthcare reform of the 1990s, the number of acute hospital beds in Saskatoon District Health was cut in half. The emergency room and outpatient facilities were not able to accommodate an increasing number of patients needing urgent assessments and medical procedures. In this article, we describe the development, implementation and utilization of a day medicine program. This description may be useful to others planning healthcare delivery to medical patients, especially in a setting of resource constraint.
PubMed ID
12908162 View in PubMed
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34 records – page 1 of 4.