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Diabetes and it's complications in a Swedish county.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48096
Source
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 1998 Feb;39(2):157-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1998
Author
B. Lundman
L. Engström
Author Affiliation
Department of Advanced Nursing, Umeå University, Sweden. berit.lundman@nurssci.umu.se
Source
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 1998 Feb;39(2):157-64
Date
Feb-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Albuminuria - complications
Cardiovascular Diseases - complications
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - complications - epidemiology - therapy
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - epidemiology - therapy
Diabetic diet
Diabetic Ketoacidosis - complications
Diabetic Nephropathies - epidemiology - therapy
Diabetic Neuropathies - epidemiology - therapy
Diabetic Retinopathy - epidemiology - therapy
Female
Fundus Oculi
Health Services - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Humans
Hypertension - complications
Hypoglycemic agents - therapeutic use
Insulin - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - complications
Ophthalmoscopy
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Sex Factors
Smoking
Sulfonylurea Compounds - therapeutic use
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
A cross-sectional survey with the aim to study the prevalence of diabetes and long-term complications was carried out in a health care district in Sweden with 125,500 inhabitants. Information was extracted from the medical records. 4127 people with diabetes were identified of whom 87% were classified as NIDDM (non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus), 12% as IDDM (insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus) and 0.7% as secondary or unclassified diabetes. The prevalence of diagnosed diabetes was 3.3%. A total of 83% received their regular routine care at primary health care centres, 31% were treated with diet only, 36% had oral hypoglycaemic agents, 31% had insulin and 2% had combination therapy. The mean HbA1c was 7.2% (ref. range 4.0-5.3%). Of the adults (> 18 years) 27% had retinopathy, 13% had nephropathy and 27% had loss of pallaesthesia. 50% had hypertension, 21% angina pectoris, 11% had had myocardial infarction, 11% stroke, 21% had signs of peripheral arterial disease, 2% had been amputated and 21% were smokers. The conclusion is that in a population of patients with diabetes with acceptable metabolic control, complications are still a great problem.
PubMed ID
9597386 View in PubMed
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Source
Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 1998 Apr;76(2):238-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1998
Author
A. Falck
L. Laatikainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 1998 Apr;76(2):238-40
Date
Apr-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cataract - complications - etiology
Cataract Extraction
Child
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - complications
Diabetic Ketoacidosis - complications
Diabetic Retinopathy - complications
Female
Humans
Male
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
PURPOSE AND METHODS: Adolescent patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) were retrospectively analyzed for the occurrence and possible predisposing factors of diabetic cataract in a population-based series of some 600 pediatric diabetics followed up during the years 1975-1995. RESULTS: Six patients (1%) needed cataract surgery. At the diagnosis of cataract they were 9.1-17.5 years old, and the duration of diabetes was between 0 months and 3 years 11 months. The type of cataract was similar in all patients characterized by bilateral snowflake type cortical deposits and posterior subcapsular cataract. Four of the six patients had at least a six-month history of diabetic symptoms before the treatment was started, and five patients had ketoacidosis at initial admission to hospital. In one of the 11 operated eyes diabetic retinopathy was observed immediately after surgery. Three patients developed proliferative retinopathy within 7-10 months after the operation, after 6.3-11.8 years of diabetes. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of diabetic cataract was around 1% in the pediatric diabetic population. In the pathogenesis of cataract long duration of diabetic symptoms and ketoacidosis prior to the commencement of treatment may be of significance. Good metabolic control after diagnosis did not protect for cataract. Diabetic cataract can safely be treated by modern surgical techniques, but close monitoring of the fundi for retinopathy after the operation is crucial, as proliferative retinopathy may develop rapidly after cataract surgery despite relatively short duration and acceptable metabolic control of diabetes.
PubMed ID
9591961 View in PubMed
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[Insulin edema in patients with diabetes mellitus and recent diabetic ketoacidosis (epidemiology and case reports)]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47089
Source
Lik Sprava. 2004 Dec;(8):39-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
N D Khalangot
M A Koka
G A Latypova
A A Bakhtiiarova
Source
Lik Sprava. 2004 Dec;(8):39-43
Date
Dec-2004
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - complications - drug therapy - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - drug therapy - epidemiology
Diabetic Ketoacidosis - complications - drug therapy - epidemiology
Edema - epidemiology - etiology
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Insulin - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Male
Medical Records
Retrospective Studies
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
Insulin edema (IE) has been known for a long time as one of complications caused by insulin therapy, but even today its pathogenesis stays unclear, and epidemiology unknown. IE incidence in patients over 15 years of age receiving treatment in the year 2003 for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in the city of Donetsk (adult population 858200) has been retrospectively studied according to clinical archives and national diabetics register data. Presented are three own observations on the development of IE after DKA treatment. 13 (17%) out of 76 DKA patients had IE. Keeping in mind reoccurring DKA incidents--16%. During IE the known duration of Diabetes Mellitus came out to be 5 years on average, and did not differ from insulin therapy duration, whereas the Diabetes Mellitus duration in non DKA group without edemas exceeded the continuance of insulin treatment by over two years (P
PubMed ID
15771070 View in PubMed
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Population-based study of incidence and risk factors for cerebral edema in pediatric diabetic ketoacidosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174967
Source
J Pediatr. 2005 May;146(5):688-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
Sarah E Lawrence
Elizabeth A Cummings
Isabelle Gaboury
Denis Daneman
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, 401 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1H 8L1.
Source
J Pediatr. 2005 May;146(5):688-92
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Brain Edema - etiology - therapy
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Diabetic Ketoacidosis - complications
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Population Surveillance - methods
Risk factors
Abstract
To determine incidence, outcomes, and risk factors for pediatric cerebral edema with diabetic ketoacidosis (CEDKA) in Canada.
This was a case-control study nested within a population-based active surveillance study of CEDKA in Canada from July 1999 to June 2001. Cases are patients with DKA
PubMed ID
15870676 View in PubMed
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