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Celiac disease and risk of subsequent type 1 diabetes: a general population cohort study of children and adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80065
Source
Diabetes Care. 2006 Nov;29(11):2483-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Ludvigsson Jonas F
Ludvigsson Johnny
Ekbom Anders
Montgomery Scott M
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Orebro University Hospital, Orebro 701 85, Sweden. jonasludvigsson@yahoo.com
Source
Diabetes Care. 2006 Nov;29(11):2483-8
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Celiac Disease - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - epidemiology
Diabetic Coma - epidemiology
Diabetic Ketoacidosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Registries
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Earlier studies suggest that children with type 1 diabetes are more likely to have a subsequent diagnosis of celiac disease. However, research is sparse on the risk of subsequent type 1 diabetes in individuals with celiac disease. We sought to determine the risk of subsequent type 1 diabetes diagnosed before the age of 20 years in children and adolescents with celiac disease in a national, general population-based cohort. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We identified 9,243 children with a diagnosis of celiac disease in the Swedish national inpatient register between 1964 and 2003. We then identified five reference individuals matched at time of diagnosis for age, calendar year, sex, and county (n = 45,680). Only individuals with >1 year of follow-up after study entry (diagnosis of celiac disease) were included in the analyses. RESULTS: Celiac disease was associated with a statistically significantly increased risk of subsequent type 1 diabetes before age 20 years (hazard ratio 2.4 [95% CI 1.9-3.0], P
PubMed ID
17065689 View in PubMed
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[Diabetic hyperosmolar non-ketotic coma. A retrospective study from a central hospital of patients admitted over a 20-year period]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48850
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1986 Mar 10;148(11):648-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-10-1986

A nationwide population-based study on the risk of coma, ketoacidosis and hypoglycemia in patients with celiac disease and type 1 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278531
Source
Acta Diabetol. 2015 Dec;52(6):1167-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Matthew Kurien
Kaziwe Mollazadegan
David S Sanders
Jonas F Ludvigsson
Source
Acta Diabetol. 2015 Dec;52(6):1167-74
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Biopsy
Celiac Disease - complications - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - complications - epidemiology
Diabetic Coma - epidemiology
Diabetic Ketoacidosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hypoglycemia - epidemiology
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Population
Risk
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Celiac disease (CD) may influence metabolic control in type 1 diabetes (T1D). This work examines whether CD in T1D influences hospital admissions due to coma, ketoacidosis and hypoglycemia.
In population-based cohort study, individuals with CD were identified using biopsy data (1969-2008) from Sweden's 28 pathology departments. T1D was defined as a recorded diagnosis of T1D at age =30 years in the Swedish National Patient Register between 1964 and 2009. In total, 906 individuals had both T1D and CD and were matched for sex, age and calendar period with 4303 reference individuals. Through stratified Cox regression analysis, we modeled CD as a time-dependent covariate and estimated the risk of future coma, ketoacidosis and hypoglycemia, defined by relevant international classification of disease codes among T1D patients with and without CD.
During follow-up, patients with both T1D and CD had 49 hospital admissions with diabetic coma, 91 episodes of ketoacidosis and 25 hypoglycemic events. Among patients with T1D, CD did not influence the risk of coma (adjusted HR 0.97; 95 % CI 0.72-1.32), ketoacidosis (adjusted HR 1.08; 95 % CI 0.86-1.34), or hypoglycemia (adjusted HR 1.34; 95 % CI 0.87-2.05). The absolute risk of coma was 621/100,000 person-years in T1D and CD (637 in controls). Corresponding figures for ketoacidosis were 1175/100,000 person-years in T1D and CD (1092 in controls) and for hypoglycemia 316/100,000 person-years (236 in controls). HRs for metabolic emergencies in T1D were similar in the first 5 years after T1D diagnosis as thereafter.
Having a diagnosis of CD is unlikely to influence the risk of coma, ketoacidosis and hypoglycemia in T1D patients.
PubMed ID
26403595 View in PubMed
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