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The development and pilot testing of The Diabetes Activities Questionnaire (TDAQ): an instrument to measure adherence to the diabetes regimen.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206933
Source
Appl Nurs Res. 1997 Nov;10(4):202-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1997
Author
C A Hernandez
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Windsor, Ontario.
Source
Appl Nurs Res. 1997 Nov;10(4):202-11
Date
Nov-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Diabetes Mellitus - psychology - rehabilitation
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Patient compliance
Pilot Projects
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
PubMed ID
9419917 View in PubMed
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Learning to live with diabetes--integrating an illness or objectifying a disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126982
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2012 Nov;68(11):2486-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Asa Kneck
Birgitta Klang
Ingegerd Fagerberg
Author Affiliation
University College Department of Health Care Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2012 Nov;68(11):2486-95
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Decision Making
Diabetes Mellitus - psychology - rehabilitation
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Narration
Problem Solving
Qualitative Research
Self Care - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
This paper is a report of a study of illuminating the meaning of 'learning to live with diabetes' 3 years after being diagnosed.
A changed situation, for example, in relation to living with diabetes, raises a need to understand. How time for experience contributes to this learning process for people living with diabetes is not yet well understood. It would therefore seem valuable to ask people, who have had diabetes over a similar length of time, to narrate their experience in relation to daily life situations in order to understand better how learning is established.
The study has a qualitative design.
A life world approach was used, with interviews being conducted with 13 people who had been diagnosed with diabetes 3 years earlier. Data were collected in 2007, and analyses were conducted using a phenomenological-hermeneutic method.
How a person experiences the physical body was found to be crucial in the learning process. If the body with its signals is understood it can be a tool for experiencing and understanding the world and oneself. Feeling insecure about one's own needs, and not trusting or understanding bodily signs, made participants dependent on others to make decisions for them.
This study showed that duration of illness was 'not' of importance for the understanding of living with diabetes. Living with diabetes 3 years after being diagnosed meant to experience both an overall balance in one's existence and a daily struggle.
PubMed ID
22335357 View in PubMed
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Twenty-five years of a diabetes education centre.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229006
Source
Diabet Med. 1990 Jun;7(5):400-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1990
Author
J A Hunt
Author Affiliation
Diabetes Day Centre, Lions Gate Hospital, North Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Diabet Med. 1990 Jun;7(5):400-6
Date
Jun-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Diabetes Mellitus - psychology - rehabilitation
Humans
Learning
Motivation
Patient compliance
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Teaching - methods
PubMed ID
2142036 View in PubMed
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What attracts patients with diabetes to an internet support group? A 21-month longitudinal website study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195377
Source
Diabet Med. 2001 Feb;18(2):154-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2001
Author
J F Zrebiec
A M Jacobson
Author Affiliation
Behavioural and Mental Health Unit, Joslin Diabetes Center, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA. john.zrebiec@joslin.harvard.edu
Source
Diabet Med. 2001 Feb;18(2):154-8
Date
Feb-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Diabetes Mellitus - psychology - rehabilitation
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - rehabilitation
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - rehabilitation
Female
Humans
Internet - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Interpersonal Relations
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Patient Education as Topic
Referral and Consultation
Social Support
United States
Abstract
To establish and evaluate a web-based educational and emotional resource for patients with diabetes and their family members.
A total of 47 365 user visits over a 21-month period to three internet discussion groups about diabetes were tracked for user activity, characteristics and level of satisfaction.
The primary domains of users were the US (70%) and Canada (4%). Of all users, 7.55% posted messages, while 92.45% read messages posted by others. The average length of use was 15 min 5 s. Forty-four per cent posted messages to the nutrition discussion, 38% posted messages to the motivational discussion, and 18% posted messages to the family discussion. The most common postings addressed nutrition (42%), the emotional impact of diabetes (18%), managing high or low blood glucose levels (10%), and complications (8%). Respondents to the satisfaction survey were 64% female, 43% were insulin and 37% non-insulin users. Eighty-four per cent were older than 30 years, 34% had recently diagnosed diabetes and 32% had diabetes > 10 years. Forty-three per cent visited more than three times. Seventy-nine per cent of all respondents rated participation in the chat as having a positive effect on coping with diabetes.
A professionally moderated internet discussion group is actively visited by a broad base of patients and families, and appears to be a useful strategy for engaging patients with chronic disease for emotional support and information exchange.
PubMed ID
11251681 View in PubMed
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