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[Adipose tissue as an endocrine organ: role in pathogenesis of ischemic heart disease and insulin independent diabetes mellitus]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47408
Source
Lik Sprava. 2002;(8):36-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
I I Lapchyns'ka
M F Stefaniuk
Source
Lik Sprava. 2002;(8):36-9
Date
2002
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - metabolism
Diabetes Complications
Diabetes Mellitus - etiology - metabolism
Endocrine System - metabolism
English Abstract
Hormones - biosynthesis
Humans
Myocardial Ischemia - etiology - metabolism
Obesity - complications - metabolism
Protein Biosynthesis
Abstract
Obesity is a risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The present review of the modern literature is devoted to the problem of regarding the adipose tissue as not only a repository of energy supplies but an active endocrine organ as well whose activity exerts a definite effect on the function of many bodily systems. Specific emphasis is directed toward aspects of the function of certain secretory proteins involved in the process of the arterial pressure regulation and/or organs injuring.
PubMed ID
12669536 View in PubMed
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Association between parental history of diabetes and type 2 diabetes genetic risk scores in the PPP-Botnia and Framingham Offspring Studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134523
Source
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2011 Aug;93(2):e76-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Jason L Vassy
Peter Shrader
Anna Jonsson
Caroline S Fox
Valeriya Lyssenko
Bo Isomaa
Leif Groop
James B Meigs
Paul W Franks
Author Affiliation
General Medicine Division, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
Source
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2011 Aug;93(2):e76-9
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - etiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - etiology
Finland - epidemiology
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Life Style
Medical History Taking
Middle Aged
Parents
Risk factors
United States - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Parental history of diabetes and specific gene variants are risk factors for type 2 diabetes, but the extent to which these factors are associated is unknown.
We examined the association between parental history of diabetes and a type 2 diabetes genetic risk score (GRS) in two cohort studies from Finland (population-based PPP-Botnia study) and the US (family-based Framingham Offspring Study).
Mean (95% CI) GRS increased from 16.8 (16.8-16.9) to 16.9 (16.8-17.1) to 17.1 (16.8-17.4) among PPP-Botnia participants with 0, 1, and 2 parents with diabetes, respectively (p(trend)=0.03). The trend was similar among Framingham Offspring but was not statistically significant (p=0.07). The meta-analyzed p value for trend from the two studies was 0.005.
The very modest associations reported above suggest that the increased risk of diabetes in offspring of parents with diabetes is largely the result of shared environmental/lifestyle factors and/or hitherto unknown genetic factors.
Notes
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Cites: N Engl J Med. 2008 Nov 20;359(21):2220-3219020324
PubMed ID
21570145 View in PubMed
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Associations between daily cause-specific mortality and concentrations of ground-level ozone in Montreal, Quebec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192698
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Nov 1;154(9):817-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2001
Author
M S Goldberg
R T Burnett
J. Brook
J C Bailar
M F Valois
R. Vincent
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. mark.goldberg@mcgill.ca
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Nov 1;154(9):817-26
Date
Nov-1-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - mortality
Age Factors
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
Analysis of Variance
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - mortality
Cause of Death
Diabetes Mellitus - etiology - mortality
Digestive System Diseases - etiology - mortality
Humans
Kidney Diseases - etiology - mortality
Linear Models
Meteorological Concepts
Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Ozone - adverse effects - analysis
Poisson Distribution
Quebec - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Respiration Disorders - etiology - mortality
Risk factors
Seasons
Abstract
The authors investigated the association between daily variations in ozone and cause-specific mortality. Fixed-site air pollution monitors in Montreal, Quebec, provided daily mean levels of ozone, particles, and other gaseous pollutants. Information on the date and underlying cause of death was obtained for residents of Montreal who died in the city between 1984 and 1993. The authors regressed the logarithm of daily counts of cause-specific mortality on mean levels of ozone, after accounting for seasonal and subseasonal fluctuations in the mortality time series, non-Poisson dispersion, and weather variables. The effect of ozone on mortality was generally higher in the warm season and among persons aged 65 years or over. For an increase in the 3-day running mean concentration of ozone of 21.3 microg/m(3), the percentage of increase in daily deaths in the warm season was the following: nonaccidental deaths, 3.3% (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.7, 5.0); cancer, 3.9% (95% CI: 1.0, 6.91); cardiovascular diseases, 2.5% (95% CI: 0.2, 5.0); and respiratory diseases, 6.6% (95% CI: 1.8, 11.8). These results were independent of the effects of other pollutants and were consistent with a log-linear response function.
PubMed ID
11682364 View in PubMed
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Body iron stores are associated with serum insulin and blood glucose concentrations. Population study in 1,013 eastern Finnish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209241
Source
Diabetes Care. 1997 Mar;20(3):426-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1997
Author
T P Tuomainen
K. Nyyssönen
R. Salonen
A. Tervahauta
H. Korpela
T. Lakka
G A Kaplan
J T Salonen
Author Affiliation
Research Institute of Public Health, University of Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Diabetes Care. 1997 Mar;20(3):426-8
Date
Mar-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Glucose - analysis - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - etiology
Fasting
Ferritins - blood - metabolism
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Fructosamine - blood
Glucose Tolerance Test
Homeostasis
Humans
Insulin - blood - metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
To study if there is an association between mildly elevated body iron and glucose homeostasis indexes.
A cross-sectional population study was conducted in 1,013 middle-aged men, and an association of serum ferritin with concentrations of serum insulin, blood glucose, and serum fructosamine was tested.
The mean concentration of fasting serum insulin was 21.6% higher (95% CI 7.3-37.9%, P
PubMed ID
9051399 View in PubMed
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Canadian national retrospective chart review comparing the long term effect of cyclosporine vs. tacrolimus on clinical outcomes in patients with post-liver transplantation hepatitis C virus infection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116457
Source
Ann Hepatol. 2013 Mar-Apr;12(2):282-93
Publication Type
Article
Author
Eric M Yoshida
Leslie B Lilly
Paul J Marotta
Andrew L Mason
Marc Bilodeau
Marc Vaillancourt
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. eric.yoshida@vch.ca
Source
Ann Hepatol. 2013 Mar-Apr;12(2):282-93
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antiviral agents - therapeutic use
Biological Markers - blood
Canada
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular - immunology - virology
Chi-Square Distribution
Cyclosporine - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Diabetes Mellitus - etiology
Female
Graft Rejection - immunology - virology
Hepacivirus - genetics
Hepatitis C - complications - diagnosis - drug therapy - mortality - virology
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Liver Cirrhosis - immunology - virology
Liver Neoplasms - immunology - virology
Liver Transplantation - adverse effects - immunology - mortality
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
RNA, Viral - blood
Recurrence
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Tacrolimus - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Viral Load
Abstract
The transition from regular use of cyclosporine to the newer calcineurin-inhibitors, such as tacrolimus, has been suggested as a contributing factor to the "era effect" of worsening outcomes of post-transplant HCV recurrence. This retrospective medical chart review of 458 patients was undertaken to evaluate the role of immunosuppressant choice (cyclosporine vs. tacrolimus) in determining virologic response and clinical outcomes of post-liver transplant HCV infection recurrence. Our results showed that patients undergoing interferon-based treatment taking cyclosporine have significantly better odds (OR: 2.59, P = 0.043) of presenting a sustained viral response (66.7%) compared to tacrolimus (52.8%). This did not result in a significant effect on post-liver transplantation clinical events including HCV-related deaths, graft loss, fibrosing cholestatic hepatitis, hepatocellular carcinoma or graft rejection. Other variables, which showed a significant relationship with the achievement of sustained viral response included donor age (OR 0.96, P = 0.001) and HCV genotype 1 infection (OR 0.05, P
PubMed ID
23396740 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular and diabetes mortality determined by nutrition during parents' and grandparents' slow growth period.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47481
Source
Eur J Hum Genet. 2002 Nov;10(11):682-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2002
Author
G. Kaati
L O Bygren
S. Edvinsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Social Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Hum Genet. 2002 Nov;10(11):682-8
Date
Nov-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - mortality
Diabetes Mellitus - etiology - mortality
Diet
Humans
Parents
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Overfeeding and overeating in families are traditions that are often transferred from generation to generation. Irrespective of these family traditions, food availability might lead to overfeeding, in its turn leading to metabolic adaptations. Apart from selection, could these adaptations to the social environment have transgenerational effects? This study will attempt to answer the following question: Can overeating during a child's slow growth period (SGP), before their prepubertal peak in growth velocity influence descendants' risk of death from cardiovascular disease and diabetes? Data were collected by following three cohorts born in 1890, 1905 and 1920 in Overkalix parish in northern Sweden up until death or 1995. The parents' or grandparents' access to food during their SGP was determined by referring to historical data on harvests and food prices, records of local community meetings and general historical facts. If food was not readily available during the father's slow growth period, then cardiovascular disease mortality of the proband was low. Diabetes mortality increased if the paternal grandfather was exposed to a surfeit of food during his slow growth period. (Odds Ratio 4.1, 95% confidence interval 1.33-12.93, P=0.01). Selection bias seemed to be unlikely. A nutrition-linked mechanism through the male line seems to have influenced the risk for cardiovascular and diabetes mellitus mortality.
Notes
Comment In: Eur J Hum Genet. 2002 Nov;10(11):669-7112404095
PubMed ID
12404098 View in PubMed
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[Cardiovascular disease and omega-3 fatty acids]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3187
Source
Minerva Med. 1997 Sep;88(9):343-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1997
Author
E. Ponte
D. Cafagna
M. Balbi
Author Affiliation
Cattedra di Angiologia, Università degli Studi, Trieste.
Source
Minerva Med. 1997 Sep;88(9):343-53
Date
Sep-1997
Language
Italian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angioplasty, Transluminal, Percutaneous Coronary
Arteriosclerosis - etiology - metabolism - therapy
Blood Vessels - physiology
Diabetes Mellitus - etiology - metabolism
English Abstract
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - metabolism - physiology
Humans
Hypertension - etiology - metabolism
Lipid Metabolism
Myocardial Infarction - etiology
Platelet Adhesiveness
Vasodilation
Abstract
Fish oil is rich in the long chain omega-3 (omega-3) polyinsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), Pioneering studies of Dyerberg and Bang primarily originate interests in this way. The low incidence of acute myocardial infarction they verified within the Greenland Eskimos suggested that a high dietary omega-3 PUFA intake due to marine food might protect against coronary heart disease. They showed that the Eskimos had a beneficial lipid pattern and that their balance between pro-aggregatory thromboxanes and anti-aggregatory prostacyclins was shifted towards an anti-thrombotic state. The two major omega-3 fatty acids are decosapentaenoic acid (EPA C 20:5, omega 3), with five double bonds, and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA C 22:6, omega 3), with six double bonds. These fatty acids' significant effects include reduction of plasma triglycerides and lipoprotein levels as well as of platelets thrombogenicity in the microcirculation, which is due to effects on the mediators production derived from arachidonic acid (prostaglandins and leucotrienes), meddling in inflammatory and immune cell function, retarded atherosclerosis development. Experimental studies of atherogenesis and arterial thrombogenesis support the hypothesis that dietary omega-3 PUFA intake may play a leading role in primary or secondary prevention of coronary heart disease.
PubMed ID
9411311 View in PubMed
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[Changes in calcium homeostasis in the development of diabetes mellitus]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48038
Source
Fiziol Zh. 1998;44(4):15-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
Ie P Kostiuk
Author Affiliation
Institute of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Academy of Medical Sciences, Kiev, Ukraine.
Source
Fiziol Zh. 1998;44(4):15-31
Date
1998
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Calcium - metabolism
Diabetes Mellitus - etiology - metabolism
Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental - etiology - metabolism
English Abstract
Homeostasis - physiology
Humans
Insulin - secretion
Vitamin D - metabolism
Abstract
The review analyzes the mechanisms of hormonal regulation of the exchange of Ca ions in the organisms and the role of changes in their extra- and intracellular balance in the development of diabetes mellitus. Recent data about changes in intracellular Ca homeostasis which lead to alterations in insulin secretion are presented. A conclusion is made about tight connections of disturbances in hormonal and calcium homeostasis in the pathogenesis of diabetes and its complications.
PubMed ID
9669170 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol Suppl. 1996;216:52-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
N T Pedersen
H. Worning
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Medicine, Herning Centralsygehus, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol Suppl. 1996;216:52-8
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Pain - etiology
Celiac Disease - etiology
Chronic Disease
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus - etiology
Duodenal Ulcer - complications
Humans
Pancreatitis - complications
Abstract
Chronic pancreatitis is a serious disease with many yet unsolved problems, e.g. pathogenesis, cause of pain and treatment. Danish gastroenterologists have for many years participated actively in the investigation of the disease and have produced many internationally recognized results, especially regarding secretion physiology and pathophysiology, epidemiology, cause of pain and characterization of the secondary diabetes mellitus. In the past 25 years more than 60 Danish papers about chronic pancreatitis have been published in international, reviewed journals. Furthermore six theses on subjects related to chronic pancreatitis have been produced. In this article the Danish contribution to the literature on chronic pancreatitis during the past 25 years is reviewed.
PubMed ID
8726279 View in PubMed
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Clinical and molecular aspects of juvenile hemochromatosis in Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean (Quebec, canada).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198828
Source
Blood Cells Mol Dis. 2000 Feb;26(1):10-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2000
Author
S R Rivard
C. Mura
H. Simard
R. Simard
D. Grimard
G. Le Gac
O. Raguenes
C. Férec
M. De Braekeleer
Author Affiliation
Département des Sciences Fondamentales, Université du Québec à Chicoutimi, Canada.
Source
Blood Cells Mol Dis. 2000 Feb;26(1):10-4
Date
Feb-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Child
DNA Mutational Analysis
Diabetes Mellitus - etiology
Family Health
Female
Ferritins - blood
Genotype
Heart Diseases - etiology
Hemochromatosis - blood - complications - genetics
Humans
Hypogonadism - etiology
Iron - blood
Iron Overload - blood - genetics
Liver Cirrhosis - etiology
Male
Mutation
Quebec
Transferrin - metabolism
Abstract
We report the clinical, biochemical, and genetic characteristics of 13 hemochromatosis patients from Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean in whom the first symptoms appeared before age 30. Although the mean age at onset of the first symptoms was 21. 5 years, their mean age at diagnosis was 23.8 years; the diagnosis was particularly delayed among women. Seventy-seven percent of the patients had hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism and 69% heart failure and/or cardiac arrhythmias. Genetic analysis of the HFE gene revealed heterozygosity for the C282Y mutation in 2 patients and for the S65C mutation in 2 others and homozygosity for the H63D mutation in 1 patient. The remaining 8 patients had no identified mutation in the HFE gene, although sequencing of all seven codons and intron-exon junctions was performed (5 patients). All 13 patients fulfill the clinical criteria of juvenile hemochromatosis and represent the largest cluster thus far reported.
PubMed ID
10772871 View in PubMed
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44 records – page 1 of 5.