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Association of type D personality with unhealthy lifestyle, and estimated risk of coronary events in the general Icelandic population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126518
Source
Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2013 Apr;20(2):322-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Erla Svansdottir
Johan Denollet
Bolli Thorsson
Thorarinn Gudnason
Sigrun Halldorsdottir
Vilmundur Gudnason
Krista C van den Broek
Hrobjartur D Karlsson
Author Affiliation
CoRPS Center of Research on Psychology in Somatic diseases, Tilburg, The Netherlands.
Source
Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2013 Apr;20(2):322-30
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Chi-Square Distribution
Coronary Artery Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Dyslipidemias - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Exercise
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Life Style
Logistic Models
Male
Medication Adherence
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Obesity - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Odds Ratio
Personality
Prevalence
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Sedentary lifestyle
Smoking - adverse effects
Smoking Cessation
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Type D personality is associated with an increased morbidity and mortality risk in cardiovascular disease patients, but the mechanisms explaining this risk are unclear. We examined whether Type D was associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) risk factors, estimated risk of developing CAD, and previous cardiac events.
Cross-sectional study in the general Icelandic population.
A random sample of 4753 individuals (mean age 49.1 ± 12.0 years; 49% men) from the REFINE-Reykjavik study completed assessments for Type D personality and conventional CAD risk factors. Ten-year risk of developing CAD was estimated with the Icelandic risk calculator.
Type D personality (22% of sample) was associated with a higher prevalence of hypertension (35 vs. 31%, p = 0.009), but less use of hypertension medication (58 vs. 65%, p = 0.013) in hypertensives, more diabetes (6 vs. 4%, p = 0.023), wider waist circumference (p = 0.007), and elevated body mass index (p = 0.025) and blood lipids (p
PubMed ID
22383854 View in PubMed
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Child maltreatment, psychopathological symptoms, and onset of diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism and COPD in adulthood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298253
Source
J Affect Disord. 2018 12 01; 241:80-85
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
12-01-2018
Author
Mashhood Ahmed Sheikh
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø 9037, Norway. Electronic address: mashhood.a.sheikh@uit.no.
Source
J Affect Disord. 2018 12 01; 241:80-85
Date
12-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child Abuse - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Hypothyroidism - epidemiology - psychology
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology - psychology
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess the associations between child maltreatment (CM), psychopathological symptoms, and onset of diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism (i.e., low metabolism), and chronic bronchitis/emphysema/COPD in adulthood.
The present analysis used cross-sectional data collected in 2007-2008 within the Tromsø Study, Norway (N?=?12,981). CM was measured with a single item, and self-reported information on psychopathological symptoms and physical health outcomes was used. The associations between CM, psychopathological symptoms, and physical health outcomes were assessed with linear and Poisson regression models. Mediation was assessed with difference-in-coefficients method.
In the fully-adjusted models, CM was associated with higher levels of anxiety and depression, psychological distress, difficulty in sleeping, insomnia, and use of sleeping pills and antidepressants in adulthood (p?
PubMed ID
30099267 View in PubMed
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A comparison of clinical characteristics between adolescent males and females with eating disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267377
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2015;15:45
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Elisabeth Welch
Ata Ghaderi
Ingemar Swenne
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2015;15:45
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - epidemiology - psychology
Body Weight
Celiac Disease - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - psychology
Eating Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Eating disorders (ED) are serious disorders that have a negative impact on both the psychological and the physiological well-being of the afflicted. Despite the fact that ED affect both genders, males are often underrepresented in research and when included the sample sizes are often too small for separate analyses. Consequently we have an unclear and sometimes contradictory picture of the clinical characteristics of males with ED. The aim of the present study was to improve our understanding of the clinical features of adolescent males with eating disorders.
We compared age at presentation, weight at presentation, history of significantly different premorbid weight and psychiatric (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)) and somatic comorbidity (celiac disease and diabetes) of 58 males to 606 females seeking medical care for eating disorders at the Children's Hospital in Uppsala, Sweden during the years 1999-2012. As all boys were diagnosed with either AN or Other Specified Feeding or Eating Disorder (OSFED) atypical AN, the age and weight comparisons were limited to those girls fulfilling the diagnostic criteria for AN or OSFED atypical AN.
There was no significant difference in age at presentation. Differences in weight at presentation and premorbid weight history were mixed. A significantly higher percentage of males had a history of a BMI greater than two standard deviations above the mean for their corresponding age group. As well, there was a higher prevalence of ADHD among the males whereas celiac disease and diabetes only was found among the females.
A better understanding of the clinical characteristics of males with ED at presentation should improve our ability to identify males with ED and thereby aid in tailoring the best treatment alternatives.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25885652 View in PubMed
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Conception of wellness in families with a diabetic child.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183841
Source
J Health Psychol. 2003 Sep;8(5):573-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Sylvie Jutras
Pauline Morin
Renée Proulx
Marie Claude Vinay
Emmanuelle Roy
Lysanne Routhier
Author Affiliation
Département de Psychologie, Université du Québec a Montréal, C. P. 8888; Succursale Centre-Ville, Montréal, Québec H3C 3P8, Canada. jutras.sylvie@uqam.ca
Source
J Health Psychol. 2003 Sep;8(5):573-86
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Attitude to Health
Caregivers - psychology
Child
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - psychology
Educational Status
Family - psychology
Family Relations
Female
Health Behavior
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Mothers - psychology
Quebec - epidemiology
Siblings - psychology
Sick Role
Social Behavior
Abstract
Focusing on wellness and adopting perspectives from positive and perceptual psychology, perceptions about health and illness were studied in 55 families with diabetic children, their siblings (8-17 years old) and mothers. Individual interviews were conducted on definitions of wellness, rationale for children's self-evaluation of wellness, consequences of wellness and definition of diabetes. Content analysis revealed that respondents have a comprehensive definition of wellness focusing on adaptation and performance. Significant role-specific differences emerged. Mothers' perceptions reflected their role in caregiving and socializing children. Children emphasized school performance and absence of health problems. Siblings focused on harmonious relationships. In accordance with the perspective of positive psychology, adults' as well as children's perceptions are congruent with the pursuit of wellness despite chronic illness.
PubMed ID
19177718 View in PubMed
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Diabetes and depression in Denmark 1996-2010: national data stratified by occupational status and annual income.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289985
Source
Diabet Med. 2017 01; 34(1):108-114
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2017
Author
B Cleal
U H Panton
I Willaing
R I G Holt
Author Affiliation
Steno Health Promotion Research, Steno Diabetes Center, Gentofte, Denmark.
Source
Diabet Med. 2017 01; 34(1):108-114
Date
01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Depression - drug therapy - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder, Major - drug therapy - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - psychology
Drug Prescriptions
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Income
Male
Middle Aged
Occupations
Poverty
Registries
Risk
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological - drug therapy - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
To assess the socio-economic distribution of comorbid depression and diabetes among the Danish workforce using national registry data.
Using national registers, all eligible Danish adults aged 18-59 years on 1 January 1996 were followed until 31 December 2010. Diabetes status was obtained from the Danish National Diabetes Register and information on purchase of prescription antidepressants from the Register of Medicinal Product Statistics. Data were also obtained on people's occupational status and gross annual income. The people included in the study were stratified according to their highest occupational group during the study period. Annual incomes were adjusted to 2013 levels and, using the distribution of the study population's incomes, we stratified participants into income quintiles.
A total of 3 434 420 individuals met the inclusion criteria at baseline, with 98 006 developing diabetes during follow-up. There were 603 498 new prescriptions of antidepressants during follow-up; 19 849 (20.3%) among people with diabetes and 583 649 (17.5%) among those without. People with diabetes in all income quintiles (risk ratio 1.65; 95% CI 1.62-1.67) and all occupational groups (risk ratio 1.70; 95% CI 1.68- 1.73) had a significantly elevated risk compared with the general population. Risk ratios were significantly higher among the lowest occupational groups and income quintiles.
Our results provide robust data underlining the associations between diabetes, depression and socio-economic status. They highlight and encourage further focus on the issue of comorbid diabetes and depression, particularly among the most disadvantaged.
PubMed ID
27425221 View in PubMed
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Diabetes and psychiatric illness in the total population of Stockholm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258259
Source
J Psychosom Res. 2014 Sep;77(3):169-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Per Wändell
Gunnar Ljunggren
Lars Wahlström
Axel C Carlsson
Author Affiliation
Centre for Family Medicine, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden. Electronic address: per.wandell@ki.se.
Source
J Psychosom Res. 2014 Sep;77(3):169-73
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anxiety - epidemiology
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inpatients - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Primary Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Schizophrenia - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Concomitant psychiatric disorders in people with diabetes affect morbidity and mortality. We aimed to study psychiatric morbidity in people with diabetes and the general population using administrative health care data in Stockholm County.
The study population included all living persons who resided in Stockholm County, Sweden, on January 1, 2011 (N=2,058,408). Subjects with a diagnosis of diabetes were identified with data from all consultations in primary health care, specialist outpatient care and inpatient care during the time span 2009-2013. As outcome, information was obtained on all consultations due to any psychiatric diagnosis as well as, specifically, schizophrenia, bipolar disorders, depression, and anxiety disorders, in 2011-2013. Analyses were performed by age group and gender. Age-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for women and men with diabetes, using individuals without diabetes as referents, were calculated.
Age-adjusted OR for all psychiatric diagnoses among people with diabetes was 1.296 (95% CI 1.267-1.326) for women and 1.399 (95% CI 1.368-1.432) for men. The greatest excess risk was found for schizophrenia, with OR 3.439 (95% CI 3.057-3.868) in women and 2.787 (95% CI 2.514-3.089) in men, with ORs between 1.276 (95% CI 1.227-1.327) and 1.714 (95% CI 1.540-1.905) for the remaining diagnoses.
The prevalence of psychiatric disorders is elevated in people with diabetes, which calls for preventive action to be taken to minimize suffering and costs to society.
PubMed ID
25149026 View in PubMed
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Exploration of the relationship between household food insecurity and diabetes in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148801
Source
Diabetes Care. 2009 Dec;32(12):2218-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Enza Gucciardi
Janet A Vogt
Margaret DeMelo
Donna E Stewart
Author Affiliation
Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. egucciar@ryerson.ca
Source
Diabetes Care. 2009 Dec;32(12):2218-24
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Complications - epidemiology - psychology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - psychology
Employment
Exercise
Female
Food Supply
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Ontario - epidemiology
Perception
Personal Satisfaction
Poverty
Prevalence
Stroke - epidemiology
Abstract
To determine the household food insecurity (HFI) prevalence in Canadians with diabetes and its relationship with diabetes management, self-care practices, and health status.
We analyzed data from Canadians with diabetes aged >or=12 years (n = 6,237) from cycle 3.1 of the Canadian Community Health Survey, a population-based cross-sectional survey conducted in 2005. The HFI prevalence in Canadians with diabetes was compared with that in those without diabetes. The relationships between HFI and management services, self-care practices, and health status were examined for Ontarians with diabetes (n = 2,523).
HFI was more prevalent among individuals with diabetes (9.3% [8.2-10.4]) than among those without diabetes (6.8% [6.5-7.0]) and was not associated with diabetes management services but was associated with physical inactivity (odds ratio 1.54 [95% CI 1.10-2.17]), lower fruit and vegetable consumption (0.52 [0.33-0.81]), current smoking (1.71 [1.09-2.69]), unmet health care needs (2.71 [1.74-4.23]), having been an overnight patient (2.08 [1.43-3.04]), having a mood disorder (2.18 [1.54-3.08]), having effects from a stroke (2.39 [1.32-4.32]), lower satisfaction with life (0.28 [0.18-0.43]), self-rated general (0.37 [0.21-0.66]) and mental (0.17 [0.10-0.29]) health, and higher self-perceived stress (2.04 [1.30-3.20]). The odds of HFI were higher for an individual in whom diabetes was diagnosed at age
Notes
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PubMed ID
19720843 View in PubMed
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Factors associated with disability and depressive symptoms among individuals with diabetes: a community study in Quebec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136257
Source
Psychosomatics. 2011 Mar-Apr;52(2):167-77
Publication Type
Article
Author
Norbert Schmitz
Lyne Messier
Danit Nitka
Anna Ivanova
Genevieve Gariepy
Jianli Wang
Ashok Malla
Richard Boyer
Alain Lesage
Irene Strychar
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. norbert.schmitz@mcgill.ca
Source
Psychosomatics. 2011 Mar-Apr;52(2):167-77
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Depression - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - psychology
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons - psychology
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Social Class
Social Support
Abstract
The prevalence of diabetes in Canada is increasing. Multiple factors have been identified in the development of disability in diabetic patients, but the interaction of those risk factors is not clear.
The purpose of this paper was to assess the association between diabetes severity, health behavior, socioeconomic status, social support, depression, and disability simultaneously in a population-based study of individuals with diabetes in Quebec, Canada.
Random digit dialing was used to select a sample of 2,003 adults with self-reported diabetes in Quebec. Health status was assessed by the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II and the CDC Healthy Days Measures. The Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) was used to assess depression. Potential risk factors included diabetes severity, social support, socioeconomic status, and health behavior factors. Structural equation models were used to identify risk factors that contributed to both depressive symptoms and disability.
The prevalence of major and minor depression was 8.7% and 10.9%, respectively, while the prevalence of severe disability was 6.7%. Diabetes severity and health behavior factors were associated with both depression and disability. Social support was associated with depression for women but not for men.
Our results suggest a complex interaction between health behavior factors, diabetes severity, social support, depression, and disability. Behavioral factors and diabetes-specific factors might have a direct effect on both depression and physical functioning.
PubMed ID
21397110 View in PubMed
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Health care use, drug treatment and comorbidity in patients with schizophrenia or non-affective psychosis in Sweden: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292467
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2017 12 29; 17(1):416
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-29-2017
Author
Erica M Brostedt
Mussie Msghina
Marie Persson
Björn Wettermark
Author Affiliation
Department of Healthcare Development, Public Health Care Services, Stockholm County Council, Box 6909, 102 39, Stockholm, Sweden. Erica.Brostedt@sll.se.
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2017 12 29; 17(1):416
Date
12-29-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Psychotic Disorders - drug therapy - epidemiology - psychology
Schizophrenia - drug therapy - epidemiology
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
This study investigated the prevalence of schizophrenia (ICD-10 F 20) and of other non-affective psychosis (NAP, ICD-10 F 21 - F 29) in Sweden. It further assessed health care use, comorbidity and medication for these patient groups. Most studies either have a study population of patients with strictly defined schizophrenia or a psychosis population of which strict schizophrenia cases form a smaller set. The present study permits comparison of the two mutually exclusive patient groups using data at the individual level in the diagnosis of non-affective psychosis, use of health care, medical treatment and comorbidity by diagnosis or medical treatment.
In 2012, data were extracted from a regional registry containing patient-level data on consultations, hospitalisations, diagnoses and dispensed drugs for the total population in the region of Stockholm (2.1 million inhabitants). The size of the total psychosis population was 18,769, of which 7284 had a diagnosis of schizophrenia. Crude prevalence rates and risk rates with 95% confidence intervals were calculated.
In 2012, the prevalence of schizophrenia and NAP was 3.5/1000 and 5.5/1000, respectively. Schizophrenia was most common among patients aged 50-59 years and NAP most common among patients aged 40-49 years. Schizophrenia patients used psychiatric health care more often than the NAP patients but less overall inpatient care (78.6 vs. 60.0%). The most prevalent comorbidities were substance abuse/dependence (7.9% in the schizophrenia group vs. 11.7% in the NAP group), hypertension (7.9 vs. 9.7%) and diabetes (6.9 vs. 4.8%). The parenteral form of long-acting injectable antipsychotics was more often dispensed to patients with schizophrenia (10 vs. 2%).
This study, analysing all diagnoses recorded in a large health region, confirmed prevalence rates found in previous studies. Schizophrenia patients use more psychiatric and less overall inpatient health care than NAP patients. Differences between the two patient groups in comorbidity and drug treatment were found. The registered rates of a substance abuse/dependence diagnosis were the most common comorbidity observed among the patients investigated. The observed differences between the schizophrenia and the NAP patients in health care consumption, comorbidity and drug treatment are relevant and warrant further studies.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29284436 View in PubMed
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Health-related quality of life in adolescents with chronic physical illness in northern Russia: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256840
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2014;12:12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Anna Zashikhina
Bruno Hagglof
Author Affiliation
Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Department of Clinical Science, Umea University, Umeå S-901 87, Sweden. Anna.Zashikhina@psychiat.umu.se.
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2014;12:12
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Asthma - epidemiology - psychology
Chronic Disease - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - psychology
Epilepsy - epidemiology - psychology
Humans
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Russia - epidemiology
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Health related quality of life (HRQoL) is an important subjectively evaluated outcome of adolescents physical, mental, and social functioning. It gives us the possibility to assess the disease impact on life of adolescents, and to sort out target groups of adolescents for future psychological interventions. The objective of this cross-sectional survey was to study HRQoL in 173 adolescents with chronic physical illness (CPI - diabetes, asthma, and epilepsy), and to find HRQoL predictors in each disease group.
Disease-specific questionnaires were completed by each adolescent recruited from the local outpatient clinic; mothers answered the questions on socioeconomic status (SES); and the patients' clinicians evaluated the severity of the disease.
A high proportion of adolescents in each disease specific sample reported moderate to high levels of HRQoL. Gender was the most prominent predictor of HRQoL in all three studied groups, while disease severity predicted HRQoL in the diabetic group and to some extent in the asthma group.
Our results provide evidence that adolescents with diabetes, asthma, and epilepsy in northern Russia maintain relatively moderate to high levels of HRQoL. The domains affecting HRQoL were related to both disease-specific (severity) and non-disease factors (gender and SES). Our study suggests that future psychosocial interventions should focus on aspects of CPI impacting adolescents in gendered ways, furthermore taking into account disease specific factors.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24460738 View in PubMed
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