Skip header and navigation

Refine By

166 records – page 1 of 17.

2011 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations: an annual update.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128763
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2011 Dec;57(12):1393-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Norm Campbell
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2011 Dec;57(12):1393-7
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists - therapeutic use
Canada
Diabetes Complications - complications
Diabetes Mellitus - drug therapy
Health education
Health Policy
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy - prevention & control
Life Style
Risk factors
Stroke - complications
Notes
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2001 Aug;22(15):1343-5211465967
Cites: Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2010 Oct;17(5):519-2320195154
Cites: Stroke. 2002 May;33(5):1315-2011988609
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2002 Jun;18(6):657-6112107423
Cites: J Hypertens. 2004 Jan;22(1):11-915106785
Cites: Arch Neurol. 1993 Aug;50(8):855-628352673
Cites: Fam Pract. 1997 Apr;14(2):160-769137956
Cites: Am J Hypertens. 1997 Oct;10(10 Pt 1):1097-1029370379
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2005 Jun 27;165(12):1410-915983291
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2007 May 1;23(6):437-4317487286
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2007 May 15;23(7):529-3817534459
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2007 Nov 26;167(21):2296-30318039987
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2007 Dec;23(14):1124-3018060097
Cites: Circulation. 2008 Feb 12;117(6):743-5318212285
Cites: Lancet Neurol. 2008 May;7(5):391-918396107
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2008 Jun;24(6):483-418548145
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2008 Jun;24(6):485-9018548146
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2008 Jun;24(6):497-118548148
Cites: Am J Hypertens. 2008 Nov;21(11):1210-518772857
Cites: Hypertension. 2009 Feb;53(2):128-3419114646
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2009 May;25(5):279-8619417858
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2009 May;25(5):299-30219417860
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2009 Jun;30(12):1434-919454575
Cites: J Hypertens. 2009 Jul;27(7):1472-719474763
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2009 Aug;25(8):451-219668778
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2009 Nov 23;169(21):1996-200219933962
Cites: Pharmacotherapy. 2010 Mar;30(3):228-3520180606
Cites: Health Rep. 2010 Mar;21(1):37-4620426225
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2010 Apr 29;362(17):1575-8520228401
Cites: Int J Stroke. 2010 Apr;5(2):110-620446945
Cites: Curr Opin Cardiol. 2010 Jul;25(4):366-7220502323
Cites: JAMA. 2002 Feb 27;287(8):1003-1011866648
PubMed ID
22170191 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adherence to statin therapy and the incidence of ischemic stroke in patients with diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277321
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2016 Feb;25(2):161-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Maarit Jaana Korhonen
Päivi Ruokoniemi
Jenni Ilomäki
Atte Meretoja
Arja Helin-Salmivaara
Risto Huupponen
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2016 Feb;25(2):161-9
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Brain Ischemia - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - drug therapy - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - administration & dosage
Incidence
Male
Medication Adherence
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance - methods
Risk factors
Stroke - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
We aimed to quantify for the first time the relationship between statin adherence and ischemic stroke (IS) in patients with diabetes.
Using Finnish health registers, we assembled a cohort of 52?868 statin initiators with diabetes in 1995-2006. We conducted a nested case-control analysis matching cases with IS with up to four controls for age, sex, date of statin initiation and follow-up duration. Adjusted rate ratios for IS were estimated with conditional logistic regression. Additional potential confounders were considered with inverse probability weighting and the role of unmeasured confounding using external adjustment. Statin adherence was measured as the proportion of days covered (PDC).
Among 1703 cases and 6799 controls, good adherence to statins (PDC?=?80%) was associated with a 23% decreased incidence of IS (95%CI 14-32%) compared with poor adherence (PDC?
PubMed ID
26687512 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alternative routes of insulin delivery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47325
Source
Diabet Med. 2003 Nov;20(11):886-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
D R Owens
B. Zinman
G. Bolli
Author Affiliation
University of Wales College of Medicine, Cardiff, UK. owensdr@cardiff.ac.uk
Source
Diabet Med. 2003 Nov;20(11):886-98
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Buccal
Administration, Inhalation
Administration, Intranasal
Administration, Oral
Administration, Sublingual
Diabetes Mellitus - drug therapy
Drug Administration Routes
Humans
Insulin - administration & dosage
Nebulizers and Vaporizers
Abstract
Attempts at replicating physiological insulin secretion, as a means of restoring the normal metabolic milieu and thereby minimizing the risk of diabetic complications, has become an essential feature of insulin treatment. However, despite advances in the production, purification, formulation and methods of delivery of insulin which have occurred in recent years, this has met with limited success. The current advocacy of intensive insulin therapy regimens involving multiple daily subcutaneous injection places a heavy burden of compliance on patients and has prompted interest in developing alternative, less invasive routes of delivery. To date, attempts to exploit the nasal, oral, gastrointestinal and transdermal routes have been mainly unsuccessful. The respiratory tree, with a large surface area, offers the greatest potential for the delivery of polypeptide drugs and there is renewed interest in administrating insulin by the intrapulmonary route. Current pulmonary drug delivery systems include a variety of pressurized metered dose inhalers, dry powder inhalers, nebulizers and aqueous mist inhalers. Recent clinical studies suggest a possible role for inhaled insulin in fulfilling meal-related insulin requirements in persons with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Most experience with inhaled insulin has been obtained using either dry powder formulation in the Nektar Pulmonary Inhaler/Exubera device (Nektar Therapeutics Inc., San Carlos, CA, Aventis, Bridgewater, NJ, Pfizer, NY) or a liquid aerosol formulation in the AERx Insulin Diabetes Management System (Aradigm Corp., Hayward, CA, NovoNordisk A/S, Copenhagen, Denmark). If long-term safety and efficacy is confirmed, inhalation may become the first non-subcutaneous route of insulin administration for widespread clinical use. Despite overwhelming interest and investment in administering insulin via the oral route, success is not expected in the short term. Attempts at utilizing the buccal mucosa and skin are also continuing. Pancreatic transplantation will remain limited to those patients receiving a kidney transplant and immunotherapy. Islet cell transplantation is at an early though encouraging stage following the availability of new less toxic immunosuppressive agents. True insulin independence will require further advances in the combined fields of cell biology and genetics to ensure freedom from both the need for lifelong administration of insulin and the complications of diabetes.
PubMed ID
14632713 View in PubMed
Less detail

Analyses of data quality in registries concerning diabetes mellitus--a comparison between a population based hospital discharge and an insulin prescription registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48317
Source
J Med Syst. 1996 Feb;20(1):1-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1996
Author
G L Nielsen
H T Sørensen
A B Pedersen
S. Sabroe
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine M, Aalborg Hospital, Denmark.
Source
J Med Syst. 1996 Feb;20(1):1-10
Date
Feb-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - drug therapy - epidemiology
Humans
Insulin - therapeutic use
Medical Record Linkage
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Predictive value of tests
Prescriptions, Drug - statistics & numerical data
Registries - standards
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
To evaluate the data quality in the Danish National Registry of Patients (DNRP) and the Prescription Registry in the country of Northern Jutland (487,000 inhabitants) concerning insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and insulin treated diabetes mellitus, a comparison between data in the two registries was made. From the Regional Hospital Registry in the County of Northern Jutland, containing discharge diagnoses from all admissions to hospitals in the county, we identified all patients with the IDDM diagnosis between 1987 and 1993. From the Regional Prescription Registry all insulin prescriptions taken up at pharmacies in the county in 1993 were identified. All persons were identified by their individual identification number (CPR-number), and a record linkage between the two data sources was made. The predictive value of an IDDM-registration in the DNRP was 96% and the corresponding completeness 91%. In the Prescription Registry the completeness was 96%. Both registries seem to be valuable study bases for epidemiological research in diabetes mellitus.
PubMed ID
8708487 View in PubMed
Less detail

An estimation of the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in Norway. A prescription registration study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38377
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1988 Nov;6(4):233-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1988
Author
A C Staff
I. Baksaas
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacotherapeutics, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1988 Nov;6(4):233-7
Date
Nov-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - drug therapy - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hypoglycemic agents - therapeutic use
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Insulin - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Pharmacies - statistics & numerical data
Prescriptions, Drug
Abstract
A prevalence of 0.9% for drug-treated diabetes mellitus was calculated (male 0.8; female 1.0) for Norway, based upon a survey of 6777 prescriptions of antidiabetic drugs at 61.5% of Norwegian pharmacies during a four-week period in 1984. A male dominance was found below the age of 50 years, gradually shifting towards female dominance among the elderly. These findings are in accordance with a population screening on diabetes mellitus in the county of Nord-Trøndelag, and may indicate that prescription data can be a valuable source in the estimation of sex and age prevalence figures. Compared to screening, prescription studies are more simple to perform and cheaper, and can provide valuable background information in primary health care.
PubMed ID
3068761 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antidiabetic drug use and prostate cancer risk in the Finnish Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284128
Source
Scand J Urol. 2017 Feb;51(1):5-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
Antti Haring
Teemu J Murtola
Kirsi Talala
Kimmo Taari
Teuvo L J Tammela
Anssi Auvinen
Source
Scand J Urol. 2017 Feb;51(1):5-12
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Diabetes Mellitus - drug therapy
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Early Detection of Cancer
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hypoglycemic agents - therapeutic use
Insulin - therapeutic use
Male
Metformin - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Neoplasm Metastasis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prostatic Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology
Protective factors
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Risk factors
Sulfonylurea Compounds - therapeutic use
Thiazolidinediones - therapeutic use
Abstract
Diabetic men have lowered overall prostate cancer (PCa) risk, while their risk of high-grade disease may be elevated. The antidiabetic drug metformin may reduce the risk. This study evaluated PCa incidence among users of metformin and other antidiabetic drugs in the Finnish Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (FinRSPC).
The study population (78,615 men) was linked to the national prescription database. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for PCa were estimated using Cox regression, with medication use as a time-dependent variable. The effect of diabetes was estimated by comparing antidiabetic drug users to non-users, while drug-specific effects were evaluated within antidiabetic drug users. Analyses were performed in both study arms of FinRSPC.
Compared to non-users, men using antidiabetic drugs had lowered overall PCa risk (HR 0.85, 95% CI 0.79-0.92), and this association was not affected by PCa screening. However, the risk of metastatic PCa was increased (HR 1.44, 95% CI 1.09-1.91). Among antidiabetic drug users, metformin decreased overall PCa risk (HR 0.81, 95% CI 0.69-0.95) in a dose-dependent manner. When stratified by FinRSPC study arm, the risk reduction was observed only in the screening arm. Sulphonylureas increased the risk of metastatic PCa (HR 2.04, 95% CI 1.11-3.77). Use of thiazoledenediones or insulin was not associated with PCa risk.
Among antidiabetic drug users, metformin lowered the overall PCa risk, while the risk of metastatic disease was elevated in sulphonylurea users. As sulphonylureas stimulate insulin secretion, the results suggest that hyperinsulinemia may be a risk factor for PCa.
PubMed ID
28084175 View in PubMed
Less detail

Anti-diabetic drug use and the risk of motor vehicle crash in the elderly.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169929
Source
Can J Clin Pharmacol. 2006;13(1):e112-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Brenda Hemmelgarn
Linda E Lévesque
Samy Suissa
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Can J Clin Pharmacol. 2006;13(1):e112-20
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Diabetes Mellitus - drug therapy
Female
Humans
Hypoglycemic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Logistic Models
Male
Metformin - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Quebec - epidemiology
Sulfonylurea Compounds - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Abstract
Studies of the risk of motor vehicle crash associated with diabetes have produced conflicting results.
To assess whether the use of anti-diabetic drugs among the elderly increases the risk of motor vehicle crash.
The computerized databases of the various universal insurance programs of Québec were linked to form a cohort of all 224,734 elderly drivers that was followed from 1990-1993. Using a nested case-control approach, all 5,579 drivers involved in an injurious crash (cases) and a random sample of 13,300 control subjects were identified. Exposure to anti-diabetic drugs was assessed in the year preceding the index date, namely the date of the crash for the cases and a randomly selected date during follow-up for the controls.
The adjusted rate ratio of an injurious crash was 1.4 (95% CI: 1.0-2.0) for current users of insulin monotherapy relative to non-users and 1.3 (95% CI: 1.0-1.7) for sulfonylurea and metformin combined. Monotherapy, using either a sulfonylurea or metformin, was not associated with an increased risk. There was a dose-response effect in subjects using high doses of combined oral therapy (RR 1.4; 95% CI: 1.0-2.0). For users of insulin monotherapy or of high doses of combined oral therapy, the increase corresponds to an excess rate of 32 crashes per 10,000 elderly drivers per year.
L Elderly drivers treated with insulin monotherapy or a combination of sulfonylurea and metformin, especially at high doses, have a small increased risk of injurious crashes. There is no increased risk associated with any regimen of oral monotherapy.
PubMed ID
16585812 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antihypertensive drug treatment in a Swedish community: Skaraborg Hypertension and Diabetes Project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47547
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2002 Jan-Feb;11(1):45-54
Publication Type
Article
Author
Erik Bøg-Hansen
Ulf Lindblad
Jonas Ranstam
Arne Melander
Lennart Råstam
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. fou-enheten.skara@swipnet.se
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2002 Jan-Feb;11(1):45-54
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Age Distribution
Aged
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Calcium Channel Blockers - therapeutic use
Comparative Study
Diabetes Mellitus - drug therapy
Diuretics - therapeutic use
Drug Utilization Review
Female
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy
Male
National Health Programs - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Sweden
Abstract
PURPOSE: To describe and compare the pattern of antihypertensive drug prescriptions during different time periods. METHODS: Antihypertensive prescriptions were registered in all patients who underwent an annual follow-up during 1998 (n = 984), 1992-1993 (n = 924), and 1981 (n = 689), at the hypertension outpatient clinic in primary health care, Skara, Sweden. RESULTS: From 1981 to 1998 the total prescriptions of thiazides declined from 61 to 10% (p
PubMed ID
11998551 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antihypertensive medication prescribing in 27,822 elderly Canadians with diabetes over the past decade.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170039
Source
Diabetes Care. 2006 Apr;29(4):836-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Finlay A McAlister
Norman R C Campbell
Minh Duong-Hua
Zhongliang Chen
Karen Tu
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R7, Canada. finlay.mcalister@ualberta.ca
Source
Diabetes Care. 2006 Apr;29(4):836-41
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Canada
Comorbidity
Diabetes Mellitus - drug therapy
Drug Therapy, Combination
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy
Male
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data - trends
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine whether prescribing practices for elderly individuals with diabetes and hypertension changed over the past decade.
We linked the Ontario Diabetes Database and four administrative databases in Ontario, Canada, to identify 27,822 patients >65 years of age who had diabetes and were newly treated for hypertension between 1 January 1995 and 31 December 2001. All patients were followed for 2 years after their initial antihypertensive medication prescription.
The 27,822 patients in this study (mean age 72 years, 51% men) were treated with oral hypoglycemic agents alone (n = 17,128 patients, 62%), insulin alone (n = 2,346, 8%), both oral hypoglycemic agents and insulin (n = 2,205, 8%), or diet alone (n = 6,143, 22%). Management within the first 2 years of hypertension diagnosis consisted of antihypertensive monotherapy in 20,183 patients (73%), two antihypertensive drugs in 6,207 (22%), and three or more drugs in 1,432 (5%); the most frequently chosen antihypertensive drugs were ACE inhibitors (68%), thiazides (15%), and calcium channel blockers (9%). Between 1995 and 2001, physician prescribing practices changed: the population-adjusted rates of antihypertensive drug prescribing increased by 46% (95% CI 33-55%), the proportion of initial antihypertensive prescriptions for ACE inhibitors increased from 54 to 76% (P
PubMed ID
16567824 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antioxidant activity in medicinal plants associated with the symptoms of diabetes mellitus used by the indigenous peoples of the North American boreal forest.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188485
Source
J Ethnopharmacol. 2002 Oct;82(2-3):197-205
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2002
Author
Letitia M McCune
Timothy Johns
Author Affiliation
Department of Plant Science, Macdonald Campus, McGill University, Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue, Quebec, Canada. letitiamccune@msn.com
Source
J Ethnopharmacol. 2002 Oct;82(2-3):197-205
Date
Oct-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antioxidants - isolation & purification - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Canada - ethnology
Diabetes Mellitus - drug therapy - metabolism
Humans
Indians, North American
Medicine, Traditional
Phytotherapy - methods
Plant Extracts - isolation & purification - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Plant Structures
Plants, Medicinal
Trees
Abstract
Thirty-five plant species were selected from the published literature as traditionally used by the Indigenous Peoples of the boreal forest in Canada for three or more symptoms of diabetes or its complications. Antioxidant activities in methanolic extracts support the contribution of these traditional medicines in a lifestyle historically low in the incidence of diabetes. In a DPPH assay of free radical scavenging activity 89% of the methanol extracts had activity significantly greater than common modern dietary components, 14% were statistically equal to ascorbic acid and 23% had activities similar to green tea and a Trolox positive control. Superoxides produced with an NBT/xanthine oxidase assay found scavenging was significantly higher in 29% of the species as compared with the modern dietary components and Trolox. The methanol extracts of Rhus hirta, Quercus alba and Cornus stolonifera performed similarly to green tea's in this assay. Assessment of peroxyl radical scavenging using a DCF/AAPH assay showed 60% of the plant extracts statistically similar to Trolox while R. hirta and Solidago canadensis extracts were greater than green tea, ascorbic acid and Trolox. The majority of the species (63 and 97%, respectively) had scavenging activities similar to ascorbic acid in the superoxide and peroxyl radical scavenging assays.
PubMed ID
12241996 View in PubMed
Less detail

166 records – page 1 of 17.