Skip header and navigation

Refine By

47 records – page 1 of 5.

Acute-phase proteins and incidence of diabetes: a population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279590
Source
Acta Diabetol. 2016 Dec;53(6):981-989
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2016
Author
Iram Faqir Muhammad
Yan Borné
Bo Hedblad
Peter M Nilsson
Margaretha Persson
Gunnar Engström
Source
Acta Diabetol. 2016 Dec;53(6):981-989
Date
Dec-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute-Phase Proteins - analysis
Aged
C-Reactive Protein - analysis
Ceruloplasmin - analysis
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Haptoglobins - analysis
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Orosomucoid - analysis
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
alpha 1-Antitrypsin - analysis
Abstract
To examine the relationship between plasma levels of the acute-phase proteins ceruloplasmin, alpha-1-antitrypsin, orosomucoid, haptoglobin and C-reactive protein (CRP), and incidence of diabetes in the population-based Malmö Diet and Cancer Study-Cardiovascular Cohort (MDCS-CC).
The study population consists of 4246 participants (aged 46-67 years, 60.8 % women) with no previous history of diabetes. Participants were followed, and incidence of diabetes was assessed by linkage with national registers and a clinical re-examination of the cohort. Cox proportional hazard regression analysis was used to compare incidence of diabetes in relation to sex-specific quartiles of the acute-phase proteins.
During a mean follow-up period of 15.6 ± 3.4 years, a total of 390 participants were diagnosed with diabetes. Orosomucoid, haptoglobin, and CRP showed a significant increased risk of diabetes after adjustment for potential confounders. However, further adjustments for fasting glucose at baseline resulted in significant association only for CRP. The multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HR: 4th vs. 1st quartile) were 1.18 (95 % CI: 0.83-1.67; p = 0.51), 1.19 (CI: 0.85-1.62; p = 0.10), and 1.40 (CI: 1.01-1.95; p = 0.046) for orosomucoid, haptoglobin, and CRP respectively.
The study demonstrated that there are associations between orosomucoid, haptoglobin and CRP and the risk of incidence of diabetes. However, after additional adjustment for fasting glucose levels at baseline, the association stayed significant only for CRP.
PubMed ID
27581604 View in PubMed
Less detail

An analysis of blood urea nitrogen and hemoglobin values in a population screened for diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature110113
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1969 Apr 26;100(16):744-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-26-1969
Author
B J Kaufman
D R Grant
J A Moorhouse
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1969 Apr 26;100(16):744-7
Date
Apr-26-1969
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Anemia - epidemiology
Blood Urea Nitrogen
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - epidemiology
Female
Hemoglobinometry
Humans
Male
Manitoba
Mass Screening
Menopause
Middle Aged
Rural Population
Sex Factors
Notes
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1965 Nov;25(11):1451-64284769
Cites: J Lab Clin Med. 1966 Mar;67(3):473-65910154
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1969 Apr 19;100(15):692-85778955
Cites: J Gerontol. 1952 Apr;7(2):207-1914927902
Cites: Br Med J. 1953 Mar 21;1(4811):647-913032433
Cites: Br Med J. 1961 Aug 26;2(5251):539-4213735860
Cites: Acta Med Scand. 1964;175:SUPPL 412:83-614154997
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 1956 Jan;4(1):24-3513286061
PubMed ID
5780745 View in PubMed
Less detail

The association between diabetes mellitus and the prevalence of intermittent claudication: the HUNT study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91559
Source
Vasc Med. 2008 Nov;13(4):239-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Jensen Svein A
Vatten Lars J
Myhre Hans O
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, University Medical Center, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Vasc Med. 2008 Nov;13(4):239-44
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Ankle - blood supply
Blood pressure
Brachial Artery - physiopathology
Diabetes Complications - blood - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - epidemiology - physiopathology
Health Surveys
Humans
Intermittent Claudication - blood - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Lipids - blood
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
The objective of this study was to investigate the association between diabetes mellitus (DM) and the prevalence of intermittent claudication (IC). Between 1995 and 1997, all residents aged 20 years or older in Nord-Trøndelag County, Norway were mailed an invitation to participate in a health survey (HUNT 2). A total of 19,712 participants aged 40-69 years old completed and returned the questionnaire included with the invitation. They also attended an examination where brachial blood pressure was measured and non-fasting venous blood was collected. The venous blood sample was subsequently analysed for concentrations of blood lipids. Responses to 12 questions on IC were previously tested against ankle blood pressure measurements (ABPI
PubMed ID
18940899 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changes in glucose tolerance among elderly Finnish men during a five-year follow-up: the Finnish cohorts of the Seven Countries Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222217
Source
Diabete Metab. 1993;19(1 Pt 2):121-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
J H Stengård
J. Pekkanen
J. Tuomilehto
P. Kivinen
E. Kaarsalo
M. Tamminen
A. Nissinen
M J Karvonen
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Diabete Metab. 1993;19(1 Pt 2):121-9
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - epidemiology
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Hyperglycemia - blood - epidemiology
Lipids - blood
Male
Prediabetic State - blood - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
It was the purpose of this study to report the natural history of glucose tolerance during a five-year follow-up among elderly Finnish men, and to evaluate the role of age and body-mass index in explaining the variation in glucose tolerance both cross-sectionally and longitudinally. In the survivors of the Finnish cohorts of the Seven-Countries Study, aged 65 to 84 years at baseline, a two-hour oral glucose-tolerance test was performed according to current WHO criteria. Subjects with fasting blood glucose > 10 mmol/l were directly classified as having diabetes at baseline.--
At baseline, of the 637 men 216 had normal and 234 had impaired glucose tolerance, 187 were diabetic. At follow-up, 172 men had died; 38 (18%) of the subjects with normal glucose tolerance at baseline had either impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes; 17 (7%) of the men with initially impaired glucose tolerance had developed diabetes, and 79 (34%) were normalized. 25 (13%) and 22 (12%) of the initially diabetic subjects had reverted to impaired or normal glucose tolerance, respectively. The age was able to explain 1-2% of variation in blood glucose level in cross-sectional but not in longitudinal comparison. Body-mass index was an important predictor of abnormal glucose tolerance in previously normally responding men. By contrast, obesity did not contribute to the development of diabetes among men with impaired glucose tolerance.--
The incidence of impaired glucose tolerance was high in these elderly Finnish men as compared with studies in middle-aged Caucasoid subjects.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
8314414 View in PubMed
Less detail

Circulating HER2/ErbB2 Levels Are Associated With Increased Incidence of Diabetes: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310430
Source
Diabetes Care. 2019 08; 42(8):1582-1588
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-2019
Author
Iram Faqir Muhammad
Yan Borné
Xue Bao
Olle Melander
Marju Orho-Melander
Peter M Nilsson
Jan Nilsson
Gunnar Engström
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden iram.faqir_muhammad@med.lu.se.
Source
Diabetes Care. 2019 08; 42(8):1582-1588
Date
08-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - complications - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Complications - blood - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - blood - epidemiology
Receptor, erbB-2 - blood
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
HER2/ErbB2 is a member of the epidermal growth factor receptor family. It is widely used as a tumor marker, but it also has recently been associated with insulin resistance. Both ErbB2 and diabetes have been associated with cancer; however, the relationship between ErbB2 and diabetes has not been well explored. The aim of this population-based cohort study was to assess the association between plasma ErbB2 and incidence of diabetes.
The study population included participants from the Malmö Diet and Cancer-Cardiovascular Cohort (age range 46-68 years). After excluding participants with a history of diabetes and those missing data for ErbB2 and other covariates, the final study population consisted of 4,220 individuals. Incidence of diabetes was followed through linkages to local and national registers. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to assess the incidence of diabetes in relation to quartiles of ErbB2, adjusted for potential confounders.
Plasma ErbB2 was significantly and positively associated with glucose, insulin, and HbA1c after being adjusted for potential confounding factors. During a mean ± SD follow-up period of 20.20 ± 5.90 years, 615 participants (14.6%) were diagnosed with new-onset diabetes. Individuals with high levels of ErbB2 had a significantly higher risk of diabetes than those with low levels of ErbB2. The multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio was 1.31 (95% CI 1.03-1.66; P
PubMed ID
31201260 View in PubMed
Less detail

Coagulation factor VII, R353Q polymorphism, and serum choline-containing phospholipids in males at high risk for coronary heart disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9490
Source
Thromb Res. 2004;113(1):57-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Anja S Lindman
Jan I Pedersen
Harald Arnesen
Elsa M Hjerkinn
Marit B Veierød
Hans Prydz
Ingebjørg Seljeflot
Author Affiliation
Center for Clinical Research, Ullevål University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. anja1@basalmed.uio.no
Source
Thromb Res. 2004;113(1):57-65
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Choline - blood
Comorbidity
Coronary Disease - blood - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - epidemiology
Factor VII - analysis - genetics - metabolism
Follow-Up Studies
Genotype
Humans
Hypercholesterolemia - epidemiology - genetics
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Norway - epidemiology
Phospholipids - analysis - blood
Polymorphism, Genetic - genetics
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Elevated levels of coagulation factor VII (FVII) have been associated with increased risk for myocardial infarction (MI). The R353Q polymorphism of the FVII gene has been shown to modify plasma levels of FVII, and has in some studies also been associated with reduced risk for MI. OBJECTIVES: To examine the R353Q polymorphism of the FVII gene and the relation to myocardial infarction (MI), cardiovascular disease (CVD), and diabetes, and furthermore, to elucidate the association between the polymorphism and plasma levels of FVII coagulant activity (FVIIc), FVII antigen (FVIIag), activated FVII (FVIIa), and serum choline-containing phospholipids (PC). METHODS: In 560 elderly men characterised as hypercholesterolemic in 1972, we examined the R353Q polymorphism by melting curve analysis after real-time PCR. In a subgroup of 205 individuals, FVIIc, FVIIag, FVIIa, and PC were analysed. RESULTS: There were no significant associations between genotype and the disease states, although we observed a lower number of MI cases among subjects with the Q allele, compared to the RR individuals (14% vs. 19%). FVIIag and FVIIc levels were lower in RQ compared to RR subjects, whereas for FVIIa the opposite was observed (p
PubMed ID
15081566 View in PubMed
Less detail

Coffee and incidence of diabetes in Swedish women: a prospective 18-year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47311
Source
J Intern Med. 2004 Jan;255(1):89-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
A. Rosengren
A. Dotevall
L. Wilhelmsen
D. Thelle
S. Johansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Ostra, Göteborg, Sweden. annika.rosengren@hjl.gu.se
Source
J Intern Med. 2004 Jan;255(1):89-95
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Body mass index
Coffee - adverse effects
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Exertion
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To examine the long-term incidence of diabetes in relation to coffee consumption in Swedish women. DESIGN: Prospective longitudinal cohort study. SETTING: City of Göteborg, Sweden. SUBJECTS: A random population sample of 1361 women, aged 39-65 years, without prior diabetes or cardiovascular disease took part in a screening study in 1979-1981 with questionnaires, physical examination and blood sampling. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The development of diabetes until 1999 was identified by questionnaires in a second screening and the Swedish hospital discharge register. RESULTS: Altogether, there were 74 new cases of diabetes. The risk of developing diabetes was 475 per 100 000 person-years in women who consumed two cups of coffee or less per day, 271 in women who consumed three to four cups per day, 202 with a consumption of five to six cups per day, and 267 in drinkers of seven cups or more per day. Associated hazard ratios, after adjustment for age, smoking, low physical activity, education and body mass index were 0.55 (0.32-0.95), 0.39 (0.20-0.77) and 0.48 (0.22-1.06) for daily consumption of three to four, five to six and seven cups or more, respectively, with a consumption of less than two per day as reference. Additional adjustment for serum cholesterol and triglycerides attenuated the relation between coffee and diabetes slightly, indicating a possible mediating effect on the effect of coffee by serum lipids. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of the present study support the hypothesis that coffee consumption protects from the development of diabetes in women.
PubMed ID
14687243 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparison between indexes of insulin resistance for risk prediction of cardiovascular diseases or development of diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276811
Source
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2015 Nov;110(2):183-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2015
Author
Björn Zethelius
Jan Cederholm
Source
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2015 Nov;110(2):183-92
Date
Nov-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged - blood - epidemiology - etiology - blood - epidemiology - etiology - blood - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - epidemiology - etiology - blood - epidemiology - etiology - blood - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - epidemiology - etiology - blood - epidemiology - etiology - blood - epidemiology
Humans - blood - epidemiology - etiology - blood - epidemiology - etiology - blood - epidemiology
Incidence - blood - epidemiology - etiology - blood - epidemiology - etiology - blood - epidemiology
Insulin - blood - epidemiology - etiology - blood - epidemiology - etiology - blood - epidemiology
Insulin Resistance - blood - epidemiology - etiology - blood - epidemiology - etiology - blood - epidemiology
Male - blood - epidemiology - etiology - blood - epidemiology - etiology - blood - epidemiology
Odds Ratio - blood - epidemiology - etiology - blood - epidemiology - etiology - blood - epidemiology
Risk Factors - blood - epidemiology - etiology - blood - epidemiology - etiology - blood - epidemiology
Sweden - blood - epidemiology - etiology - blood - epidemiology - etiology - blood - epidemiology
Abstract
The predictive effect of various insulin resistance indexes for risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) or type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is still unclear.
One thousand and forty-nine 71-years-old male subjects from the Swedish ULSAM study, mean follow-up 9 years. All subjects performed the euglycemic insulin clamp for M/I [glucose disposal/mean insulin], and 75-g oral glucose tolerance test for Ceder-IR: 1/glucose uptake rate/[mean glucose×log mean insulin]; Matsuda-IR: 1/10,000/square root [glucose0×insulin0×glucose120×insulin120]; Belfiore-IR: 1/([glucose0+glucose120]/normal mean glucose×[insulin0+insulin120]/normal mean insulin)+1); and HOMA-IR: [glucose0×insulin0]/22.5.
Bland-Altman plots showed best agreement between M/I versus Belfiore-IR and Ceder-IR with mean difference near zero, -0.21 to -0.46, while -0.68 to -0.77 for the other indexes. ISI-Ceder was the strongest predictor for incident nonfatal/fatal ischemic heart disease (CHD) or CVD at Cox regression in all subjects, and for incident T2DM at logistic regression in 1024 subjects with no baseline T2DM, with significantly higher hazard ratios or odds ratios than with all other indexes, also with best model fit, after adjusting for clinical characteristics and the traditional cardiovascular risk factors, including metabolic syndrome for CVD risk.
Ceder-IR performed strongest as independent predictor for incidences of CHD/CVD and T2DM.
PubMed ID
26421364 View in PubMed
Less detail

Complement C3 Associates With Incidence of Diabetes, but No Evidence of a Causal Relationship.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287613
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2017 Dec 01;102(12):4477-4485
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-01-2017
Author
Yan Borné
Iram Faqir Muhammad
Laura Lorés-Motta
Bo Hedblad
Peter M Nilsson
Olle Melander
Eiko K de Jong
Anna M Blom
Anneke I den Hollander
Gunnar Engström
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2017 Dec 01;102(12):4477-4485
Date
Dec-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing - genetics
Aged
Biomarkers - blood
Complement C3 - analysis - genetics
Complement Factor H
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - epidemiology - genetics
Diet
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Genetic Variation
Genome-Wide Association Study
Genotype
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Genetic
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This study explored whether complement factor 3 (C3) in plasma is associated with incidence of diabetes in a population-based cohort. We also identified genetic variants related to C3 and explored whether C3 and diabetes share common genetic determinants.
C3 was analyzed in plasma from 4368 nondiabetic subjects, 46 to 68 years old, from the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study. Incidence of diabetes was studied in relationship to C3 levels during 17.7± 4.4 years of follow-up. Genotypes associated with C3 were identified in a genome-wide association study. Diabetes Genetics Replication and Meta-Analysis and the European Genetic Database were used for in silico look-up.
In all, 538 (12.3%) subjects developed diabetes during 18 years of follow-up. High C3 was significantly associated with incidence of diabetes after risk factor adjustments (hazard ratio comparing 4th vs 1st quartile, 1.54 (95% confidence interval, 1.13 to 2.09; P = 0.005). C3 was associated with polymorphisms at the complement factor H locus (P
PubMed ID
29029276 View in PubMed
Less detail

Components of metabolic syndrome predicting diabetes: no role of inflammation or dyslipidemia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162424
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2007 Jul;15(7):1875-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2007
Author
Margareta Norberg
Hans Stenlund
Bernt Lindahl
Christer Andersson
Lars Weinehall
Gãran Hallmans
Jan W Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences Section, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umea University Hospital, Building 9B, SE-901 85 Umea, Sweden. margareta.norberg@epiph.umu.se
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2007 Jul;15(7):1875-85
Date
Jul-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - epidemiology - physiopathology
Dyslipidemias - physiopathology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Inflammation - physiopathology
Leptin - blood
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - complications - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Proinsulin - blood
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
The diagnostic criteria and the clinical usefulness of the metabolic syndrome (MetSy) are currently questioned. The objective was to describe the structure of MetSy and to evaluate its components for prediction of diabetes type 2 (T2DM).
This was a case-referent study nested within a population-based health survey. Among 33,336 participants, we identified 177 initially non-diabetic individuals who developed T2DM after 0.1 to 10.5 years (mean, 5.4 years), and, for each diabetes case, two referents matched for sex, age, and year of health survey. Baseline variables included oral glucose tolerance test, BMI, blood pressure, blood lipids, adipokines, inflammatory markers, insulin resistance, and beta-cell function. Exploratory and confirmative factor analyses were applied to hypothesize the structure of the MetSy. The prediction of T2DM by the different factors was evaluated by multivariate logistic regression analysis.
A hypothetical five-factor model of intercorrelated composite factors was generated. The inflammation, dyslipidemia, and blood pressure factors were predicitive only in univariate analysis. In multivariable analyses, two factors independently and significantly predicted T2DM: an obesity/insulin resistance factor and a glycemia factor. The composite factors did not improve the prediction of T2DM compared with single variables. Among the original variables, fasting glucose, proinsulin, BMI, and blood pressure values were predictive of T2DM.
Our data support the concept of a MetSy, and we propose five separate clusters of components. The inflammation and dyslipidemia factors were not independently associated with diabetes risk. In contrast, obesity and accompanying insulin resistance and beta-cell decompensation seem to be two core perturbations promoting and predicting progression to T2DM.
PubMed ID
17636107 View in PubMed
Less detail

47 records – page 1 of 5.