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Aboriginal participation in the DOVE study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80691
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 Jul-Aug;97(4):305-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ralph-Campbell Kelli
Pohar Sheri L
Guirguis Lisa M
Toth Ellen L
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 Jul-Aug;97(4):305-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alberta - epidemiology
Consumer Participation
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - prevention & control
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Interviews
Male
Middle Aged
Population Groups
Practice Guidelines
Quality of Health Care
Questionnaires
Rural Population
Abstract
OBJECTIVE/BACKGROUND: Aboriginals constitute a substantial portion of the population of Northern Alberta. Determinants such as poverty and education can compound health-care accessibility barriers experienced by Aboriginals compared to non-Aboriginals. A diabetes care enhancement study involved the collection of baseline and follow-up data on Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal patients with known type 2 diabetes in two rural communities in Northern Alberta. Analyses were conducted to determine any demographic or clinical differences existing between Aboriginals and non-Aboriginals. METHODS: 394 diabetes patients were recruited from the Peace and Keeweetinok Lakes health regions. 354 self-reported whether or not they were Aboriginal; a total of 94 self-reported being Aboriginal. Baseline and follow-up data were collected through interviews, standardized physical assessments, laboratory testing and self-reporting questionnaires (RAND-12 and HUI3). RESULTS: Aboriginals were younger, with longer duration of diabetes, more likely to be female, and less likely to have completed high school. At baseline, self-reported health status was uniformly worse, but the differences disappeared with adjustments for sociodemographic confounders, except for perceived mental health status. Aboriginals considered their mental health status to be worse than non-Aboriginals at baseline. Some aspects of health utilization were also different. DISCUSSION: While demographics were different and some utilization differences existed, overall this analysis demonstrates that "Aboriginality" does not contribute to diabetes outcomes when adjusted for appropriate variables.
PubMed ID
16967751 View in PubMed
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Adherence to a Healthy Nordic Food Index Is Associated with a Lower Risk of Type-2 Diabetes--The Danish Diet, Cancer and Health Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273886
Source
Nutrients. 2015 Oct;7(10):8633-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Sandra Amalie Lacoppidan
Cecilie Kyrø
Steffen Loft
Anne Helnæs
Jane Christensen
Camilla Plambeck Hansen
Christina Catherine Dahm
Kim Overvad
Anne Tjønneland
Anja Olsen
Source
Nutrients. 2015 Oct;7(10):8633-44
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - prevention & control
Diet - ethnology - standards
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Abstract
Type-2 diabetes (T2D) prevalence is rapidly increasing worldwide. Lifestyle factors, in particular obesity, diet, and physical activity play a significant role in the etiology of the disease. Of dietary patterns, particularly the Mediterranean diet has been studied, and generally a protective association has been identified. However, other regional diets are less explored.
The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between adherence to a healthy Nordic food index and the risk of T2D. The index consists of six food items: fish, cabbage, rye bread, oatmeal, apples and pears, and root vegetables.
Data was obtained from a prospective cohort study of 57,053 Danish men and women aged 50-64 years, at baseline, of whom 7366 developed T2D (median follow-up: 15.3 years). The Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess the association between the healthy Nordic food index and risk of T2D, adjusted for potential confounders.
Greater adherence to the healthy Nordic food index was significantly associated with lower risk of T2D after adjusting for potential confounders. An index score of 5-6 points (high adherence) was associated with a statistically significantly 25% lower T2D risk in women (HR: 0.75, 95%CI: 0.61-0.92) and 38% in men (HR: 0.62; 95%CI: 0.53-0.71) compared to those with an index score of 0 points (poor adherence).
Adherence to a healthy Nordic food index was found to be inversely associated with risk of T2D, suggesting that regional diets other than the Mediterranean may also be recommended for prevention of T2D.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26506373 View in PubMed
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[Alcohol is not all bad--moderate intake reduces risk of common diseases. Research data leads public health work to a difficult balance].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118558
Source
Lakartidningen. 2012 Oct 17-23;109(42):1884-8
Publication Type
Article

[A participatory approach for the prevention of type 2 diabetes for francophone youth of New Brunswick].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181239
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2004;65(1):15-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Lita Villalon
Cédée-Anne Leclair
Author Affiliation
Université de Moncton, NB.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2004;65(1):15-21
Date
2004
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - prevention & control
Diet
Exercise - physiology
Female
Focus Groups
Health promotion
Humans
Male
New Brunswick
Primary Prevention
Program Development
School Health Services - organization & administration
Schools
Abstract
Diabetes, a serious public health problem, is on the rise, claiming millions of victims. A considerable body of research exists on diabetes, but the development of effective primary prevention strategies is just beginning. This article presents the results of a project, based on an innovative approach where health professionals and community groups have come together to address the issue. The purpose of the project is to develop an intervention strategy for the prevention of type 2 diabetes directed at young francophones living in a minority environment in New Brunswick and adapted to their needs. Qualitative data were gathered from two focus groups and submitted for a content analysis. The process was evaluated. The young francophones have identified the school environment as ideal for intervention. According to them, the intervention should be adapted to the age of the youths. For the 5-to-13-year-old group, the intervention should target healthy eating habits and physical activity whereas for the 14-to-18-year-old group, the emphasis should be on preventing diabetes. The youth and the professionals acquired a greater understanding of the problem of diabetes and its prevention. Youth can now proceed to action, with appropriate guidance. The experience and knowledge of the professionals contributed to the development of the strategy. A shortage of dietitians in public health to work in the area of the prevention of diabetes has been noted.
PubMed ID
15005862 View in PubMed
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[A scientific evaluation of the "alternative" food pyramid]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47077
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2005 Feb 21;167(8):927-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-21-2005

Assessment of two culturally competent diabetes education methods: individual versus individual plus group education in Canadian Portuguese adults with type 2 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164619
Source
Ethn Health. 2007 Apr;12(2):163-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Enza Gucciardi
Margaret Demelo
Ruth N Lee
Sherry L Grace
Author Affiliation
School of Nutrition, Ryerson University, Victoria St, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. enza.gucciardi@uhn.on.ca
Source
Ethn Health. 2007 Apr;12(2):163-87
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Canada
Counseling
Cultural Characteristics
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - prevention & control
Humans
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Portugal - ethnology
Self-Help Groups
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To examine the impact of two culturally competent diabetes education methods, individual counselling and individual counselling in conjunction with group education, on nutrition adherence and glycemic control in Portuguese Canadian adults with type 2 diabetes over a three-month period.
The Diabetes Education Centre is located in the urban multicultural city of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. We used a three-month randomized controlled trial design. Eligible Portuguese-speaking adults with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to receive either diabetes education counselling only (control group) or counselling in conjunction with group education (intervention group). Of the 61 patients who completed the study, 36 were in the counselling only and 25 in the counselling with group education intervention. We used a per-protocol analysis to examine the efficacy of the two educational approaches on nutrition adherence and glycemic control; paired t-tests to compare results within groups and analysis of covariance (ACOVA) to compare outcomes between groups adjusting for baseline measures. The Theory of Planned Behaviour was used to describe the behavioural mechanisms that influenced nutrition adherence.
Attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behaviour control, and intentions towards nutrition adherence, self-reported nutrition adherence and glycemic control significantly improved in both groups, over the three-month study period. Yet, those receiving individual counselling with group education showed greater improvement in all measures with the exception of glycemic control, where no significant difference was found between the two groups at three months.
Our study findings provide preliminary evidence that culturally competent group education in conjunction with individual counselling may be more efficacious in shaping eating behaviours than individual counselling alone for Canadian Portuguese adults with type 2 diabetes. However, larger longitudinal studies are needed to determine the most efficacious education method to sustain long-term nutrition adherence and glycemic control.
PubMed ID
17364900 View in PubMed
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Association of self-perceived body image with body mass index and type 2 diabetes-The ADDITION-PRO study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268740
Source
Prev Med. 2015 Jun;75:64-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Mette Bjerggaard
Annelotte Philipsen
Marit E Jørgensen
Morten Charles
Daniel R Witte
Annelli Sandbæk
Torsten Lauritzen
Kristine Færch
Source
Prev Med. 2015 Jun;75:64-9
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Body Image - psychology
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - prevention & control - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Waist Circumference
Weight Loss
Abstract
Weight loss is important for prevention of type 2 diabetes and an accurate self-perceived body image can promote weight reduction. We evaluated the association of self-perceived body image with body mass index (BMI) and type 2 diabetes.
Data from the Danish ADDITION-PRO cohort study (2009-2011) were used. A total of 2082 men and women attended a health examination including assessment of BMI, waist circumference, the Stunkard scale of self-perceived obesity and an oral glucose tolerance test for assessment of diabetes risk.
Mean (SD) age was 66.2 (6.9) years and 24% were obese (BMI =30kg/m(2)). However, only 7% of obese men and 11% of obese women perceived themselves as obese. Among obese women, for a given level of BMI and waist circumference, one unit higher self-perceived body image was associated with 52% (95% CI: 14-73) lower risk of having type 2 diabetes and 45% (95% CI: 12-65) lower risk of having pre-diabetes. Overweight, but not obese, men had a 35% (95% CI: 36-56) lower risk of type 2 diabetes per unit increase in body image.
Obese individuals seem to underestimate their body shape. However, having a realistic body image (higher self-perceived obesity) is independently associated with lower diabetes risk. Self-perceived body image might serve as a valuable tool for type 2 diabetes risk assessment.
PubMed ID
25838208 View in PubMed
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Beyond Culture and Language: Access to Diabetes Preventive Health Services among Somali Women in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270771
Source
J Diabetes Res. 2015;2015:549795
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Abdi A Gele
Liv Elin Torheim
Kjell Sverre Pettersen
Bernadette Kumar
Source
J Diabetes Res. 2015;2015:549795
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Communication Barriers
Culture
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - prevention & control
Diet
Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Language
Norway
Preventive Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Qualitative Research
Sedentary lifestyle
Somalia - ethnology
Women
Abstract
Despite the high prevalence of type 2 diabetes in some immigrant and refugee communities in Norway, there is very little information available on their utilization of diabetes prevention interventions, particularly for women from Somali immigrant communities. A qualitative study of 30 Somali immigrant women aged 25 years and over was carried out in the Oslo area. Unstructured interviews were used to explore women's knowledge of diabetes, their access to preventive health facilities, and factors impeding their reception of preventive health programs targeted for the prevention of type 2 diabetes. The study participants were found to have a good knowledge of diabetes. They knew that a sedentary lifestyle and unhealthy diet are among the risk factors for diabetes. Regardless of their knowledge, participants reported a sedentary lifestyle accompanied with the consumption of an unhealthy diet. This was attributed to a lack of access to tailored physical activity services and poor access to health information. Considering gender-exclusive training facilities for Somali immigrant women and others with similar needs, in addition to access to tailored health information on diet, may encourage Somali women to adopt a healthy lifestyle, and it will definitely contribute to a national strategy for the prevention of diabetes.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26266267 View in PubMed
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Breastfeeding in women with diabetes: lower rates despite greater rewards. A population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113738
Source
Diabet Med. 2013 Sep;30(9):1094-101
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
S A Finkelstein
E. Keely
D S Feig
X. Tu
A S Yasseen
M. Walker
Author Affiliation
Obstetrics and Maternal Newborn Investigations (OMNI) Research Group, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, ON, Canada. Sara.finkelstein@gmail.com
Source
Diabet Med. 2013 Sep;30(9):1094-101
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Feeding
Cohort Studies
Complementary Therapies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - prevention & control
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - prevention & control
Diabetes, Gestational - prevention & control
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health promotion
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Ontario
Patient Education as Topic
Postnatal Care
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Diabetics - prevention & control
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
To explore intention to breastfeed and breastfeeding rates in hospital and on discharge across women with pre-gestational or gestational diabetes mellitus, or no diabetes.
A retrospective cohort analysis was conducted using data from four Ontario hospitals. Women who delivered a viable infant between 1 April 2008 and 31 March 2010 were included in the study. Unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios were calculated for each outcome measure and were used to compare the breastfeeding rates among women with and without diabetes.
After controlling for potential confounders, women with insulin-treated diabetes were less likely to intend to breastfeed, when compared with women without diabetes (adjusted odds ratio 0.49, 95% CI 0.27-0.89). In hospital, women with insulin-treated diabetes were least likely to breastfeed (odds ratio 0.42, 95% CI 0.26-0.67), followed by women with non-insulin-treated diabetes (odds ratio 0.50, 95% CI 0.26-0.96) and women with gestational diabetes (odds ratio 0.77, 95% CI 0.68-0.87) when compared with women without diabetes. On discharge, women with insulin-treated diabetes were least likely to breastfeed (odds ratio 0.38, 95% CI 0.24-0.60), followed by women with gestational diabetes (odds ratio 0.75, 95% CI 0.66-0.85); rates of breastfeeding among women with non-insulin-treated diabetes were comparable on discharge with those of women without diabetes. Women seeking care from an antenatal provider other than a physician were 2-3 times more likely to breastfeed in hospital and on discharge.
Women with insulin-treated diabetes had the poorest outcomes with respect to breastfeeding rates. Gestational and non-insulin-treated diabetes were associated with lower rates of breastfeeding in hospital, while gestational diabetes was additionally associated with lower breastfeeding rates on discharge.
PubMed ID
23692476 View in PubMed
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Can a physically active lifestyle prevent type 2 diabetes?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47377
Source
Exerc Sport Sci Rev. 2003 Jul;31(3):132-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
Andrea Kriska
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA. aky@pitt.edu
Source
Exerc Sport Sci Rev. 2003 Jul;31(3):132-7
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
China
Clinical Trials
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - prevention & control
Exercise
Female
Finland
Humans
Life Style
Male
Sweden
United States
Abstract
Recent clinical trials demonstrated that physical activity plays an important role in type 2 diabetes prevention. Their activity goals resembled public health recommendations: 150 min weekly of moderate intensity physical activity (brisk walking). The flexibility of this goal will make it easier to adopt by individuals of all ages and backgrounds and has the potential for being maintained over time.
PubMed ID
12882479 View in PubMed
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81 records – page 1 of 9.