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Abnormal echocardiography in patients with type 2 diabetes and relation to symptoms and clinical characteristics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286353
Source
Diab Vasc Dis Res. 2016 Sep;13(5):321-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Peter Godsk Jørgensen
Magnus T Jensen
Rasmus Mogelvang
Bernt Johan von Scholten
Jan Bech
Thomas Fritz-Hansen
Søren Galatius
Tor Biering-Sørensen
Henrik U Andersen
Tina Vilsbøll
Peter Rossing
Jan S Jensen
Source
Diab Vasc Dis Res. 2016 Sep;13(5):321-30
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diagnosis - epidemiology
Diastole
Echocardiography, Doppler
Electrocardiography
Female
Humans
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Outpatients
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Risk factors
Ventricular Dysfunction, Left - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology - physiopathology
Ventricular Function, Left
Abstract
We aimed to determine the prevalence of echocardiographic abnormalities and their relation to clinical characteristics and cardiac symptoms in a large, contemporary cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes.
A total of 1030 patients with type 2 diabetes participated. Echocardiographic abnormalities were present in 513 (49.8%) patients, mainly driven by a high prevalence of diastolic dysfunction 178 (19.4%), left ventricular hypertrophy 213 (21.0%) and left atrial enlargement, 200 (19.6%). The prevalence increased markedly with age from 31.1% in the youngest group (75?years) (p?
PubMed ID
27208801 View in PubMed
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Adult life after childhood cancer in Scandinavia: diabetes mellitus following treatment for cancer in childhood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105033
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2014 Apr;50(6):1169-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Anna Sällfors Holmqvist
Jørgen H Olsen
Klaus Kaae Andersen
Sofie de Fine Licht
Lars Hjorth
Stanislaw Garwicz
Christian Moëll
Harald Anderson
Finn Wesenberg
Laufey Tryggvadottir
Nea Malila
John D Boice
Henrik Hasle
Jeanette Falck Winther
Author Affiliation
Paediatric Oncology and Haematology, Skåne University Hospital, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. Electronic address: anna.sallfors-holmqvist@med.lu.se.
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2014 Apr;50(6):1169-75
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - diagnosis - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Neoplasms - classification - epidemiology - therapy
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Survivors - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
An increased risk for diabetes mellitus (DM) adds significantly to the burden of late complications in childhood cancer survivors. Complications of DM may be prevented by using appropriate screening. It is, therefore, important to better characterise the reported increased risk for DM in a large population-based setting.
From the national cancer registries of the five Nordic countries, a cohort of 32,903 1-year survivors of cancer diagnosed before the age of 20 between start of cancer registration in the 1940s and 1950s through 2008 was identified; 212,393 comparison subjects of the same age, gender and country were selected from national population registers. Study subjects were linked to the national hospital registers. Absolute excess risks (AERs) and standardised hospitalisation rate ratios (SHRRs) were calculated.
DM was diagnosed in 496 childhood cancer survivors, yielding an overall SHRR of 1.6 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.5-1.8) and an AER of 43 per 100,000 person-years, increasing from approximately 20 extra cases of DM in ages 0-19 to more than 100 extra cases per 100,000 person-years in ages > or =50. The relative risks for DM were significantly increased after Wilms' tumour (SHRR, 2.9), leukaemia (2.0), CNS neoplasms (1.8), germ-cell neoplasms (1.7), malignant bone tumours (1.7) and Hodgkin's lymphoma (1.6). The risk for DM type 2 was slightly higher than that for type 1.
Childhood cancer survivors are at increased risk for DM, with absolute risks increasing throughout life. These findings underscore the need for preventive interventions and prolonged follow-up of childhood cancer survivors.
PubMed ID
24507548 View in PubMed
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Source
Diabetes Care. 1985 Mar-Apr;8(2):114-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
M. Laakso
K. Pyörälä
Source
Diabetes Care. 1985 Mar-Apr;8(2):114-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - diagnosis - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
The age of onset and the clinical type of diabetes mellitus were evaluated on the basis of a cross-sectional study of medical records of 14 municipal health centers in East Finland. Altogether 281 patients were classified as having insulin-dependent (IDDM) and 2713 as having non-insulin-dependent (NIDDM) diabetes. Nearly all patients diagnosed before the age of 19 had IDDM, but a large proportion (37%) of all diagnoses of IDDM were made after that age. Six percent of all diabetic subjects in the age group 15-19 yr were classified as NIDDM and the proportion increased rapidly in older age groups. Half of the patients with NIDDM were diagnosed over the age of 64.
PubMed ID
3873328 View in PubMed
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Albuminuria and renal function as predictors of cardiovascular events and mortality in a general population of patients with type 2 diabetes: a nationwide observational study from the Swedish National Diabetes Register.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107516
Source
Diab Vasc Dis Res. 2013 Nov;10(6):520-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Maria K Svensson
Jan Cederholm
Björn Eliasson
Björn Zethelius
Soffia Gudbjörnsdottir
Author Affiliation
Department of Nephrology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Diab Vasc Dis Res. 2013 Nov;10(6):520-9
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Albuminuria - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality - physiopathology
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality - physiopathology
Comorbidity
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality - physiopathology
Diabetic Nephropathies - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality - physiopathology
Female
Heart Failure - epidemiology
Humans
Hyperlipidemias - epidemiology
Hypertension - epidemiology
Kidney - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Registries
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Reduced renal function and albuminuria predict cardiovascular (CV) events and mortality in type 2 diabetes (T2D). In addition, we evaluated the role of co-existing congestive heart failure (CHF) and other CV risk factors on CV events in a large observational population-based cohort of T2D patients.
We included 66,065 patients with T2D who were reported to the National Diabetes Register (NDR) in Sweden between 2003-2006 with a follow-up of 5.7 years. Data on outcomes were collected from the cause of death and hospital discharge registers.
A total of 10% of patients experienced a CV event and 3.7% of these were fatal. Increasing levels of albuminuria and renal impairment were independently associated with increasing risk of CV events and all-cause mortality also when adjusting for CHF. In normoalbuminuric patients, a reduction in renal function is an important predictor of CV events and all-cause mortality. Glycaemic control (high HbA1c), smoking and hyperlipidaemia had important effects on risk for CV events in patients with albuminuria, while high blood pressure, but not glycaemic control, had an effect in patients with normoalbuminuric renal impairment.
Albuminuria and renal impairment are independent risk factors for CV outcomes and mortality in T2D, albuminuria being the strongest risk factor and relevant at all levels of renal function. In normoalbuminuric patients, a reduction in renal function is an important predictor of CV events and all-cause mortality.
PubMed ID
24002670 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption, Type 2 diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance in middle-aged Swedish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10317
Source
Diabet Med. 2000 Nov;17(11):776-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2000
Author
S. Carlsson
N. Hammar
S. Efendic
P G Persson
C G Ostenson
V. Grill
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Diabet Med. 2000 Nov;17(11):776-81
Date
Nov-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking
Alcoholic Beverages
Beer
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics
Exercise
Glucose Intolerance - diagnosis - epidemiology
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Smoking
Sweden - epidemiology
Wine
Abstract
AIMS: To investigate the association between alcohol consumption and impaired glucose tolerance and Type 2 diabetes mellitus. METHODS: A population-based cross-sectional study consisting of 3,128 Swedish men, aged 35-56 years. Oral glucose tolerance testing identified 55 cases of Type 2 diabetes and 172 cases of impaired glucose tolerance. Information on alcohol consumption, family history of diabetes, smoking and physical activity was obtained by questionnaire. RESULTS: After adjustment for family history, smoking, physical activity and body mass index, the odds ratio of diabetes was 2.1 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.0-4.5) in men with high consumption of alcohol (corresponding to over 12 drinks per week) and 0.7 (0.3-1.8) in moderate consumers (7-12 drinks), compared to occasional drinkers. For impaired glucose tolerance, the corresponding odds ratios were 0.7 (0.5-1.1) and 0.6 (0.4-1.0), respectively. Separate analyses for type of beverage indicated that high consumers of beer, spirits and wine had an odds ratio for diabetes of 2.9 (1.2-6.9), 3.3 (1.4-7.8) and 1.2 (0.5-2.7), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicated that high consumption of alcohol increases the occurrence of Type 2 diabetes and that this may primarily concern consumption of beer and spirits. For impaired glucose tolerance, regular alcohol consumption was associated with a reduced prevalence, particularly at moderate levels.
PubMed ID
11131102 View in PubMed
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Aortic diameter at age 65 in men with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285510
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2017 Aug;51(4):202-206
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2017
Author
Soumia Taimour
Moncef Zarrouk
Jan Holst
Anders H Rosengren
Leif Groop
Peter M Nilsson
Anders Gottsäter
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2017 Aug;51(4):202-206
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aorta, Abdominal - diagnostic imaging
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology - prevention & control
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Dilatation, Pathologic
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Prevalence
Protective factors
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Ultrasonography
Abstract
Type 2 diabetes mellitus has been linked to a decreased risk for abdominal aortic aneurysm (aortic diameter =30?mm, AAA) development in men. The aim of this study was to evaluate if such an effect is detectable already around the time of diabetes diagnosis.
We cross-sectionally compared aortic diameter at ultrasound screening for AAA in 691 men aged 65 years with incipient or newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes (group A) with 18,262 65-year old control men without diabetes (group B).
Aortic diameter did not differ between groups (18.8[17.4-20.8] vs. 19.0[17.5-28.7] mm; p?=?0.43). AAA prevalence was 2.5% in group A and 1.5% in group B (p?=?.010). In logistic regression taking group differences in body mass index (BMI), smoking, presence of atherosclerotic disease and hypertension into account, the difference in AAA prevalence was no longer significant (p?=?.15). Among men in group A, C-peptide (r?=?.093; p?=?.034), but not HbA1c (r?=?.060; p?=?.24) correlated with aortic diameter.
Among 65 year old men aortic diameter and AAA prevalence do not differ between those with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes and those without diabetes. Putative protective effects of type 2 diabetes mellitus against aortic dilatation and AAA development therefore probably occur later after diagnosis of diabetes.
PubMed ID
28434285 View in PubMed
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Association of ADIPOR2 gene variants with cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes risk in individuals with impaired glucose tolerance: the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131047
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2011;10:83
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Niina Siitonen
Leena Pulkkinen
Jaana Lindström
Marjukka Kolehmainen
Ursula Schwab
Johan G Eriksson
Pirjo Ilanne-Parikka
Sirkka Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Matti Uusitupa
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Nutrition and Food and Health Research Centre, Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland. niina.siitonen@uef.fi
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2011;10:83
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics
Child
Child, Preschool
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Genetic Association Studies - methods
Genetic Variation - genetics
Glucose Intolerance - diagnosis - genetics
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Receptors, Adiponectin - genetics
Abstract
Adiponectin is an adipokine with insulin-sensitising and anti-atherogenic effects. Two receptors for adiponectin, ADIPOR1 and ADIPOR2, have been characterized that mediate effects of adiponectin in various tissues. We examined whether genetic variation in ADIPOR2 predicts the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and/or Type 2 Diabetes (T2DM) in individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) participating the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study (DPS).
CVD morbidity and mortality data were collected during a median follow-up of 10.2 years (range 1-13 years) and conversion from IGT to T2DM was assessed during a median follow-up of 7 years (range 1-11 years). Altogether eight SNPs in the ADIPOR2 locus were genotyped in 484 participants of the DPS. Moreover, the same SNPs were genotyped and the mRNA expression levels of ADIPOR2 were determined in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and subcutaneous adipose tissue samples derived from 56 individuals participating in the Genobin study.
In the DPS population, four SNPs (rs10848554, rs11061937, rs1058322, rs16928751) were associated with CVD risk, and two remained significant (p = 0.014 for rs11061937 and p = 0.020 for rs1058322) when all four were included in the same multi-SNP model. Furthermore, the individuals homozygous for the rare minor alleles of rs11061946 and rs11061973 had increased risk of converting from IGT to T2DM. Allele-specific differences in the mRNA expression levels for the rs1058322 variant were seen in peripheral blood mononuclear cells derived from participants of the Genobin study.
Our results suggest that SNPs in the ADIPOR2 may modify the risk of CVD in individuals with IGT, possibly through alterations in the mRNA expression levels. In addition an independent genetic signal in ADIPOR2 locus may have an impact on the risk of developing T2DM in individuals with IGT.
ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00518167.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21943112 View in PubMed
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Association of Gastric Bypass Surgery With Risk of Developing Diabetic Retinopathy Among Patients With Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes in Sweden: An Observational Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311957
Source
JAMA Ophthalmol. 2021 02 01; 139(2):200-205
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Date
02-01-2021
Author
Hanna Åkerblom
Stefan Franzén
Caddie Zhou
Åsa Morén
Johan Ottosson
Magnus Sundbom
Björn Eliasson
Ann-Marie Svensson
Elisabet Granstam
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, Region Västmanland, Västerås, Sweden.
Source
JAMA Ophthalmol. 2021 02 01; 139(2):200-205
Date
02-01-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Adult
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diagnosis - epidemiology
Diabetic Retinopathy - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Disease Progression
Female
Gastric Bypass - adverse effects
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology - surgery
Protective factors
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Knowledge of the incidence and progression of diabetic retinopathy (DR) after gastric bypass surgery (GBP) in patients with obesity and diabetes could guide the management of these patients.
To investigate the incidence of diabetic ocular complications in patients with type 2 diabetes after GBP compared with the incidence of diabetic ocular complications in a matched cohort of patients with obesity and diabetes who have not undergone GBP.
Data from 2 nationwide registers in Sweden, the Scandinavian Obesity Surgery Registry and the National Diabetes Register, were used for this cohort study. A total of 5321 patients with diabetes from the Scandinavian Obesity Surgery Registry who had undergone GBP from January 1, 2007, to December 31, 2013, were matched with 5321 patients with diabetes from the National Diabetes Register who had not undergone GBP, based on sex, age, body mass index (BMI), and calendar time (2007-2013). Follow-up data were obtained until December 31, 2015. Statistical analysis was performed from October 5, 2018, to September 30, 2019.
Gastric bypass surgery.
Incidence of new DR and other diabetic ocular complications.
The study population consisted of 5321 patients who had undergone GBP (3223 women [60.6%]; mean [SD] age, 49.0 [9.5] years) and 5321 matched controls (3395 women [63.8%]; mean [SD] age, 47.1 [11.5] years). Mean (SD) follow-up was 4.5 (1.6) years. The mean (SD) BMI and hemoglobin A1c concentration at baseline were 42.0 (5.7) and 7.6% (1.5%), respectively, in the GBP group and 40.9 (7.3) and 7.5% (1.5%), respectively, in the control group. The mean (SD) duration of diabetes was 6.8 (6.3) years in the GBP group and 6.4 (6.4) years in the control group. The risk for new DR was reduced in the patients who underwent GBP (hazard ratio, 0.62 [95% CI, 0.49-0.78]; P?
PubMed ID
33443540 View in PubMed
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Association of parental history of type 2 diabetes with age, lifestyle, anthropometric factors, and clinical severity at type 2 diabetes diagnosis: results from the DD2 study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278529
Source
Diabetes Metab Res Rev. 2016 Mar;32(3):308-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Elisabeth Svensson
Klara Berencsi
Simone Sander
Anil Mor
Jørgen Rungby
Jens Steen Nielsen
Søren Friborg
Ivan Brandslund
Jens Sandahl Christiansen
Allan Vaag
Henning Beck-Nielsen
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Reimar Wernich Thomsen
Source
Diabetes Metab Res Rev. 2016 Mar;32(3):308-15
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Anthropometry
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Weight Gain
Abstract
We investigated whether parental history of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is associated with age, lifestyle, anthropometric factors, and clinical severity at the time of T2D diagnosis.
We conducted a cross-sectional study based on the Danish Centre for Strategic Research in Type 2 Diabetes cohort. We examined the prevalence ratios (PR) of demographic, lifestyle, anthropometric, and clinical factors according to parental history, using Poisson regression adjusting for age and gender.
Of 2825 T2D patients, 34% (n?=?964) had a parental history of T2D. Parental history was associated with younger age at diagnosis [adjusted (a)PR 1.66, 95% confidence interval: 1.19, 2.31) for age
PubMed ID
26408959 View in PubMed
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Association testing of novel type 2 diabetes risk alleles in the JAZF1, CDC123/CAMK1D, TSPAN8, THADA, ADAMTS9, and NOTCH2 loci with insulin release, insulin sensitivity, and obesity in a population-based sample of 4,516 glucose-tolerant middle-aged Danes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92941
Source
Diabetes. 2008 Sep;57(9):2534-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Grarup Niels
Andersen Gitte
Krarup Nikolaj T
Albrechtsen Anders
Schmitz Ole
Jørgensen Torben
Borch-Johnsen Knut
Hansen Torben
Pedersen Oluf
Author Affiliation
Steno Diabetes Center, Copenhagen, Denmark. ngrp@steno.dk
Source
Diabetes. 2008 Sep;57(9):2534-40
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
ADAM Proteins - genetics
Adult
Antigens, Neoplasm - genetics
Calcium-Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Type 1 - genetics
Cell Cycle Proteins - genetics
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Genomics
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Insulin Resistance - genetics
Male
Membrane Glycoproteins - genetics
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Proteins - genetics
Obesity - epidemiology - genetics
Risk factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the impact on diabetes-related intermediary traits of common novel type 2 diabetes-associated variants in the JAZF1 (rs864745), CDC123/CAMK1D (rs12779790), TSPAN8 (rs7961581), THADA (rs7578597), ADAMTS9 (rs4607103), and NOTCH2 (rs10923931) loci, which were recently identified by meta-analysis of genome-wide association data. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We genotyped the six variants in 4,516 middle-aged glucose-tolerant individuals of the population-based Inter99 cohort who were all characterized by an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). RESULTS: Homozygous carriers of the minor diabetes risk G-allele of the CDC123/CAMK1D rs12779790 showed an 18% decrease in insulinogenic index (95% CI 10-27%; P = 4 x 10(-5)), an 18% decrease in corrected insulin response (CIR) (8.1-29%; P = 4 x 10(-4)), and a 13% decrease in the ratio of area under the serum-insulin and plasma-glucose curves during an OGTT (AUC-insulin/AUC-glucose) (5.8-20%; P = 4 x 10(-4)). Carriers of the diabetes-associated T-allele of JAZF1 rs864745 had an allele-dependent 3% decrease in BIGTT-AIR (0.9-4.3%; P = 0.003). Furthermore, the diabetes-associated C-allele of TSPAN8 rs7961581 associated with decreased levels of CIR (4.5% [0.5-8.4]; P = 0.03), of AUC-insulin/AUC-glucose ratio (3.9% [1.2-6.7]; P = 0.005), and of the insulinogenic index (5.2% [1.9-8.6]; P = 0.002). No association with traits of insulin release or insulin action was observed for the THADA, ADAMTS9, or NOTCH2 variants. CONCLUSIONS: If replicated, our data suggest that type 2 diabetes at-risk alleles in the JAZF1, CDC123/CAMK1D, and TSPAN8 loci associate with various OGTT-based surrogate measures of insulin release, emphasizing the contribution of abnormal pancreatic beta-cell function in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes.
PubMed ID
18567820 View in PubMed
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94 records – page 1 of 10.