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Baseline comparison of three health utility measures and the feeling thermometer among participants in the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125110
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2012;11:35
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Dennis W Raisch
Patricia Feeney
David C Goff
K M Venkat Narayan
Patrick J O'Connor
Ping Zhang
Don G Hire
Mark D Sullivan
Author Affiliation
University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA. draisch@salud.unm.edu
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2012;11:35
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - physiopathology - prevention & control - psychology
Diabetes Complications - etiology - physiopathology - prevention & control - psychology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - diagnosis - physiopathology - psychology - therapy
Emotions
Female
Health status
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Predictive value of tests
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Risk factors
United States
Abstract
Health utility (HU) measures are used as overall measures of quality of life and to determine quality adjusted life years (QALYs) in economic analyses. We compared baseline values of three HUs including Short Form 6 Dimensions (SF-6D), and Health Utilities Index, Mark II and Mark III (HUI2 and HUI3) and the feeling thermometer (FT) among type 2 diabetes participants in the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) trial. We assessed relationships between HU and FT values and patient demographics and clinical variables.
ACCORD was a randomized clinical trial to test if intensive controls of glucose, blood pressure and lipids can reduce the risk of major cardiovascular disease (CVD) events in type 2 diabetes patients with high risk of CVD. The health-related quality of life (HRQOL) sub-study includes 2,053 randomly selected participants. Interclass correlations (ICCs) and agreement between measures by quartile were used to evaluate relationships between HU's and the FT. Multivariable regression models specified relationships between patient variables and each HU and the FT.
The ICCs were 0.245 for FT/SF-6D, 0.313 for HUI3/SF-6D, 0.437 for HUI2/SF-6D, 0.338 for FT/HUI2, 0.337 for FT/HUI3 and 0.751 for HUI2/HUI3 (P ?
Notes
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PubMed ID
22515638 View in PubMed
Less detail

Left ventricular diastolic function, assessed by echocardiography and tissue Doppler imaging, is a strong predictor of cardiovascular events, superior to global left ventricular longitudinal strain, in patients with type 2 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276688
Source
Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Imaging. 2015 Sep;16(9):1000-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Peter Blomstrand
Martin Engvall
Karin Festin
Torbjörn Lindström
Toste Länne
Eva Maret
Fredrik H Nyström
John Maret-Ouda
Carl Johan Östgren
Jan Engvall
Source
Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Imaging. 2015 Sep;16(9):1000-7
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Area Under Curve
Blood Glucose - analysis
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - diagnosis - drug therapy
Echocardiography - methods
Female
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology - mortality - ultrasonography
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Stroke - etiology - mortality - ultrasonography
Stroke Volume - physiology
Survival Rate
Sweden
Ultrasonography, Doppler - methods
Ventricular Dysfunction, Left - complications - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Abstract
The aim of the study was to determine whether left ventricular systolic function, in terms of global left ventricular longitudinal strain (GLS), and diastolic function, expressed as the ratio between early diastolic transmitral flow and mitral annular motion velocities (E/e'), can predict cardiovascular events in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2.
We prospectively investigated 406 consecutive patients, aged 55-65 years, with diabetes mellitus, who participated in the CARDIPP study. Echocardiography, pulse pressure (pp), and glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) were analysed. Twelve cases of myocardial infarction and seven cases of stroke were identified during the follow-up period of 67 ? 17 months. Univariate Cox regression analysis showed that E/e' was a strong predictor of cardiovascular events (hazards ratio 1.12; 95% confidence interval 1.06-1.18, P 15 compared with 2.6% for patients with E/e' =15, P = 0.011.
In middle-aged patients with type 2 diabetes, E/e' is a strong predictor of myocardial infarction and stroke, comparable with HbA1c and superior to GLS and LVEF.
PubMed ID
25750201 View in PubMed
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Level of physical activity associated with risk of cardiovascular diseases and mortality in patients with type-2 diabetes: report from the Swedish National Diabetes Register.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256946
Source
Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2014 Feb;21(2):244-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
B. Zethelius
S. Gudbjörnsdottir
B. Eliasson
K. Eeg-Olofsson
J. Cederholm
Author Affiliation
Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2014 Feb;21(2):244-51
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - etiology - mortality - physiopathology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - diagnosis - mortality - physiopathology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Proportional Hazards Models
Questionnaires
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
To estimate risks of coronary heart disease (CHD), cardiovascular disease (CVD), and total mortality with low or higher levels of physical activity (PA) assessed with questionnaire, in an observational study of patients with type-2 diabetes from the Swedish National Diabetes Register.
A total of 15,462 patients (60 years), were followed for 5 years from baseline in 2004 until 2009, with 760 CVD events and 427 total mortality events based on 54,344 person-years.
Comparing 6963 patients with low baseline PA (never or 1-2 times/week for 30?min) and 8499 patients with higher baseline PA (regular 3 times/week or more), hazard ratios for fatal/nonfatal CHD, fatal/nonfatal CVD, fatal CVD, and total mortality were 1.25 (95% CI 1.05-1.48; p?=?0.01), 1.26 (95% CI 1.09-1.45; p?=?0.002), 1.69 (95% CI 1.18-2.41; p?=?0.004), and 1.48 (95% CI 1.22-1.79; p?
PubMed ID
24227183 View in PubMed
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Long-Term Risk of Stroke in Patients With Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes Following Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276150
Source
J Am Heart Assoc. 2015 Nov;4(11)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2015
Author
Thomas Nyström
Martin J Holzmann
Ulrik Sartipy
Source
J Am Heart Assoc. 2015 Nov;4(11)
Date
Nov-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Chi-Square Distribution
Coronary Artery Bypass - adverse effects - mortality
Coronary Artery Disease - diagnosis - etiology - mortality - surgery
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - complications - diagnosis - physiopathology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - diagnosis - physiopathology
Diabetic Angiopathies - diagnosis - etiology - mortality - surgery
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Stroke - diagnosis - etiology - mortality
Sweden
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
We performed a nationwide population-based cohort study to investigate the long-term risk of stroke after coronary artery bypass grafting in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.
All patients who underwent primary coronary artery bypass grafting in Sweden from 2000 through 2011 were included from the SWEDEHEART register. We excluded patients with prior stroke, and patients who had a stroke or died within 30 days of surgery. The National Diabetes Register was used to identify patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Incident stroke (ischemic and hemorrhagic), and all-cause mortality was obtained by record linkage with the National Patient Register and the Cause of Death register. We used multivariable Cox regression to estimate the risk of stroke in relation to type of diabetes. A total of 53 820 patients (type 1 diabetes [n=714], type 2 diabetes [n=10 054], no diabetes [n=43 052]) were included. During a mean follow-up of 7.4 years (398 337 person-years), in total, 8.0% (n=4296) of the patients had a stroke: 7.3% (n=52) in patients with type 1 diabetes, 9.1% (n=915) in patients with type 2 diabetes, and 7.7% (n=3329) in patients with no diabetes. The multivariable adjusted hazard ratio (95% CI) for all stroke was 1.59 (1.20-2.11) in type 1 diabetes, and 1.32 (1.23-1.43) in type 2 diabetes.
The long-term risk for stroke after coronary artery bypass grafting was increased in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, compared to patients with no diabetes.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26553216 View in PubMed
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Low-dose CT coronary angiography for assessment of coronary artery disease in patients with type 2 diabetes--a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274413
Source
BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2015;15:147
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Geir Reinvik Ulimoen
Anne Pernille Ofstad
Knut Endresen
Lars Gullestad
Odd Erik Johansen
Arne Borthne
Source
BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2015;15:147
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Asymptomatic Diseases
Coronary Angiography - methods
Coronary Artery Disease - ethnology - etiology - radiography
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - diagnosis - ethnology
Diabetic Angiopathies - ethnology - etiology - radiography
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multidetector Computed Tomography
Norway - epidemiology
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Radiation Dosage
Reproducibility of Results
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Vascular Calcification - ethnology - etiology - radiography
Abstract
Silent coronary artery disease (CAD) is prevalent in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Although coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) over recent years has emerged a useful tool for assessing and diagnosing CAD it's role and applicability for patients with T2DM is still unclarified, in particular in asymptomatic patients. We aimed to assess the role of CCTA in detecting and characterizing CAD in patients with T2DM without cardiac symptoms when compared to gold standard invasive coronary angiography (ICA).
This was a cross-sectional analysis of patients with T2DM without symptomatic CAD enrolled in the Asker and Baerum Cardiovascular Diabetes Study who, following clinical examination and laboratory assessment, underwent subsequently CCTA and ICA.
In total 48 Caucasian patients with T2DM (36 men, age 64.0?±?7.3 years, diabetes duration 14.6?±?6.4 years, HbA1c 7.4?±?1.1 %, BMI 29.6?±?4.3 kg/m(2)) consented to, and underwent, both procedures (CCTA and ICA). The population was at intermediate cardiovascular risk (mean coronary artery calcium score 269, 75 % treated with antihypertensive therapy). ICA identified a prevalence of silent CAD at 17 % whereas CCTA 35 %. CCTA had a high sensitivity (100 %) and a high negative predictive value (100 %) for detection of patients with CAD when compared to ICA, but the positive predictive value was low (47 %).
Low-dose CCTA is a reliable method for detection and exclusion of significant CAD in T2DM and thus may be a useful tool for the clinicians. However, a low positive predictive value may limit its usefulness as a screening tool for all CAD asymptomatic patients with T2DM. Further studies should assess the applicability for risk assessment beyond the evaluation of the vascular bed.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26573616 View in PubMed
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Treatment of hypoglycaemic diabetics in a prehospital setting is safe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269078
Source
Dan Med J. 2015 Apr;62(4):A5044
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Nikolaj Preuss Hatting
Søren Mikkelsen
Source
Dan Med J. 2015 Apr;62(4):A5044
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Ambulances - utilization
Blood Glucose - analysis
Databases, Factual
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - complications - diagnosis - drug therapy
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - diagnosis - drug therapy
Emergency Medical Services - methods - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypoglycemia - drug therapy - epidemiology - etiology
Hypoglycemic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Male
Medication Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Patients with diabetes suffering from hypoglycaemia may be treated by a Mobile Emergency Care Unit (MECU) and are often released at the scene following treatment. Some of these patients experience secondary hypoglycaemia and require renewed treatment or admission to hospital. The present study was initiated in order to investigate the extent of secondary hypoglycaemia, to evaluate the appropriateness of the current treatment practice, and to provide practical suggestions for the hand-ing of prehospital hypoglycaemia.
All MECU runs are registered in a database by the attending physician who states the patients' identity, treatment, outcome and diagnosis. Over a period of four years (1 May 2006-30 April 2010), all missions related to hypo-glycaemia were reviewed. Each entry was cross-referenced with the patient's hospital files to detect any recurrent hypoglycaemic episodes within 24 hours from initial contact.
The MECU treated 138 hypoglycaemic cases of whom 50% were released at home following treatment. Four of these patients experienced secondary hypoglycaemia. Two were treated by the MECU and two were admitted through the emergency department without contact to the MECU.
The number of patients suffering from secondary hypoglycaemia following treatment by the MECU is acceptable and in line with numbers reported by similar organisations.
not relevant.
PubMed ID
25872550 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.